Plant Pathogen Articles

  • Potassium and winter hardiness

    The role of Potassium in metabolic processes such as protein synthesis and the movement of sugars within the plant is now well understood and recognised as crucial for maximising quality and yield. But it is now known Potassium also plays a significant role in helping crops resist disease and environmental stresses during winter dormancy and ensuring optimum supplies of Potassium to see crops ...


    By Ilex EnviroSciences Limited

  • What is it about this soil that protects plants from devastating disease?

    Figuring out why certain soils keep plant parasites at bay could be a boon for agriculture around the globe Plants around the world are constantly under attack — often with big implications for humans. In the 1960s, millions of elm trees in Britain, France and the U.S. fell victim to Dutch elm disease, which clogs the vessels that carry life-giving water to the trees’ leaves. ...


    By Ensia

  • A Functional Link Between Mitochondria and the Cell Wall in Stress Responses

    Both mitochondria and the cell wall are targeted by and respond to stresses. The cell wall is physically affected by abiotic stresses and is the site of initial attack by pathogens. During stress responses, the cell wall is remodeled to maintain integrity and allow flexibility (reviewed in Hamann, 2015; Tenhaken, 2015). Similarly, stresses can alter mitochondrial function, especially in terms of ...


    By H Smith Plastics LTD

  • Molecular and physiological responses to titanium dioxide and cerium oxide nanoparticles in arabidopsis

    Changes in tissue transcriptomes and productivity of Arabidopsis thaliana were investigated during exposure of plants to two widely used engineered metal oxide nanoparticles, titanium dioxide (nano‐titanium) and cerium dioxide (nano‐cerium). Microarray analyses confirmed that exposure to either nanoparticle altered the transcriptomes of rosette leaves and roots, with comparatively larger ...


    By John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • The Latest in Whitefly Control

    Next month’s Greenhouse Canada Grower Day is welcoming leading researchers and crop specialists to help you tackle one of the industry’s biggest challenges. Whitefly is proving to be one of the most difficult pests to control, mainly due to the lack of effective registered chemicals that can eradicate silverleaf whitefly. It is also due to the unwillingness of biological suppliers to ...

  • Biopesticides Examined for Role in Field Production

    Biopesticides deserve respect. Once derided as snake oil, today’s products have proven benefits in suppressing pest organisms. Whether they activate plant defenses, parasitize or inhibit pathogen growth or make the environment less favourable to disease, they can play an integral role in crop protection. While the greenhouse sector first excelled at incorporating biopesticides in controlled ...

  • Playing hide and seek below the soil

    Below the soil of a diverse grassland area you’ll find a jungle of plant roots. It is also home to a wide variety of bacteria and fungi, of which some are pathogenic and looking for a host in the tangle of roots. It appears that this is much more difficult when there is a larger diversity of plants as the host plant is more able to hide among the varied crowd. Greater plant diversity ...

  • Control of Microthrix parvicella by aluminium salts addition

    Aluminium and iron chloride were added to a biological nutrient removal pilot plant (1,500 population equivalent) treating urban wastewater to investigate the control of Microthrix parvicella bulking and foaming by metallic salts. Monitoring plant performance over two 6-month periods showed a slight impact on the removal efficiencies. Addition of metallic salts (Me; aluminium or aluminium + ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • Presence and persistence of wastewater pathogen Escherichia coli O157:H7 in hydroponic reactors of treatment wetland species

    Treatment wetlands (TWs) efficiently remove many pollutants including a several log order reduction of pathogens from influent to effluent; however, there is evidence to suggest that pathogen cells are sequestered in a subsurface wetland and may remain viable months after inoculation. Escherichia coli is a common pathogen in domestic and agricultural wastewater and the O157:H7 strain causes ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • A New Generation of GMOs

    Is synthetic biology on its way to our farms, markets and tables? Thousands of researchers will descend on Boston this fall for an event billed as the world’s largest gathering of synthetic biologists. The field is evolving so rapidly that even scientists working in it  ...


    By Ensia

  • Food security faces growing pest advance

    Coming soon to a farm near you: just about every possible type of pest that could take advantage of the ripening harvest in the nearby fields. By 2050, according to new research in the journal Global Ecology and Biogeography, those opportunistic viruses, bacteria, fungi, blights, ...


    By Climate News Network

  • New approaches are needed for another Green Revolution

    Twenty-first century agriculture needs low-input advances like the System of Rice Intensification, says Norman Uphoff. According to the principle of diminishing returns, continuing to produce something in the same way, with the same inputs and technology, ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Review: Effects of olive mill wastewater application on soil properties and plants growth

    Comparative effects of untreated olive mill wastewater (UOMW), treated olive mill wastewater (TOMW) and bioaugmented olive mill wastewater (BOMW) on soil properties, on seeds germination and on plants growth were investigated. The water holding capacity, the salinity, the organic carbon content, humus, total nitrogen, phosphate and potassium increased when the spread amounts of UOMW (50, 100 and ...

  • Innovation of the Month: Food Fermentation for Biopreservation

    Although the word “bacteria” is usually associated with sickness and disease, it is the driving force behind fermentation, a food process on which humans have relied for millennia. Some of the earliest recorded instances of fermentation come from East Asia where, according to William Shurtleff, founder of the ...


    By Worldwatch Institute

  • Poultry processing - Ammonia removal case study

    Background: A poultry plant in the South of England processes up to 100,000 birds per week. The company operates an Activated Sludge plant followed by a Rotating Biological Contactor the whole system being required to produce effluent ammonia of 20 mg/l. Whilst the treatment plant was able to reach this standard when it was first installed, the success of the company meant that more and more ...


    By Bio Systems Europe

  • The possibility of determining of anomalies and pathologies in the offspring of liquidators of Chernobyl accident by non–radiation factors

    Hereditary effects of radiation on people are not revealed and estimations for humans have been carried out by extrapolation from mutagenesis of irradiated mice (UNSCEAR). Nevertheless, in Russia, Ukraine and Belarus disturbance and pathologies are found in the children of liquidators of the accident at the Chernobyl atomic power station. Authors connect effects only with irradiation (basically ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Field trial carried out in the ebro valley, Spain case study

    Rice farmers in Spain experience two major problems with their rice crops: After the flooding and fertilisation of the rice fields algal growth rapidly develops and covers the surface of the water in the paddy. This greatly reduces the availability of sunlight received by the seedlings until they have grown above the water level. This results in early stage plant loss which can be severe. The ...


    By Cleveland Biotech Ltd.

  • Response of bt and near-isoline corn hybrids to plant density

    Transgenic Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis) corn (Zea mays L.) hybrids with resistance to corn rootworm (CRW; Diabrotica spp.) or European corn borer [ECB; Ostrinia nubilalis (Hübner)] can have greater tolerance to water and nutrient stress, and thus may have higher optimum plant densities. Experiments were conducted following soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] over nine site-years in Illinois to ...

  • Three soybean plant introductions possess unique resistance to peanut root-knot nematode

    Peanut root-knot nematode [Meloidogyne arenaria (Neal) Chitwood or Ma] is an increasingly common pest in the southern United States where crops such as peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) and soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] are grown. Four soybean plant introductions (PIs) are highly resistant to the peanut root-knot nematode. To determine if PI 594403, PI 594427C, and PI 594651B contain useful ...

  • Canola–Wheat intercrops for improved agronomic performance and integrated pest management

    Intercropping can enhance yields and reduce pest infestations, but investigations of intercropping regimes using crop species common to the large-scale monoculture production systems of western Canada have not examined these diverse elements. Intercrops of canola (Brassica napus L.) and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) were established at three sites in Alberta, Canada in 2005 and 2006 to determine ...

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