Plant Pathogen News

  • What`s this disease?

    If you are a fan of strawberries then you have probably experienced opening a recently purchased container only to find that several berries have burst into a plume of velvety gray mold. Unfortunately, your berries have fallen prey to gray mold disease, caused by the fungus Botrytis cinerea. ...


    By AgBiome, Inc.

  • Night of the Fermenting Dead Part 1

    Srujana and Amber, having narrowly survived their encounter with the office poltergeist a year earlier, travel to the Midwest expecting a pleasant trip. Instead, they come face to face with Amber’s worst nightmare. How will the duo defeat their supernatural foes and manage to save the fermentation run at the same ...


    By AgBiome, Inc.

  • How IDEN BIOTECHNOLOGY works on delivering new bio-based products & processes to meet the UN SDGs at EFIB 2019

    The 17th and 18th of October the European Forum for Industrial Biotechnology & the Bioeconomy (EFIB) was be held in Toulouse organized by EuropaBIO. The EFIB’s mission is to foster engagement between policy makers and a broad range ...


    By Iden Biotechnology

  • A day in the entomology lab: Beetles

    Did you know that the average American eats 124 lbs of potatoes a year, that the potato was the first vegetable to be grown in space, and Vincent van Gogh painted four still-life canvases devoted entirely to the potato!? ...


    By AgBiome, Inc.

  • Segra International Partners with Supreme Cannabis to Support Expansion Efforts Leading into Legalization

    Segra International Corp. (“Segra” or the “Company”) is pleased to announce that it has entered into an agreement with The Supreme Cannabis Company (“Supreme Cannabis”) (TSXV:FIRE) (OTCQX: SPRWF) (FRA: 53S1) to provide cannabis micropropagation services at Supreme Cannabis’ wholly owned 7ACRES facility in Kincardine, Ontario. Plant micropropagation, also ...


    By Segra International Corp.

  • Scientists Create Plants That Produce Their Own Fertilizer

    Plants will be able to produce their own fertilizer in the future meaning farmers will not have to purchase and spread fertilizers for their crops anymore. The resulting increase in food production will also benefit countless numbers of people across the globe, who would otherwie go hungry. While statements like these may sound more like something out of a science fiction novel, a new study ...


    By AZoNetwork UK Ltd.

  • BioSafe Systems Introduces PVent® Biological Fungicide

    BioSafe Systems announces the release of PVent® Biological Fungicide. An enhancement in microbial fungicide technology, PVent provides growers with an easy-to-use, versatile IPM tool. This innovative development was spearheaded through a strategic partnership between two family-owned businesses: BioSafe Systems and Lallemand Plant Care. Due to its active ingredient, a 93% Gliocladium ...


    By BioSafe Systems, LLC

  • Creating Better Soybeans

    In rows of petri dishes, soybean roots bathe in fluorescent light, an unremarkable site unless you work in the laboratory where they grow. The simplicity of the setup belies the complexity of the research that went into creating the roots. For decades, the genes of the seeds that produced these roots have been tinkered with to create a plant that resists a common and highly destructive soybean ...


    By Ohio State University

  • App ‘trained’ to spot crop disease, alert farmers

    Researchers win grant to further test app for smallholders App diagnoses deadly cassava diseases in field, sends alerts Roll-out in Africa needs engagement with farmers, says expert A team of scientists has received US$100,000 grant to refine a mobile application (app) that ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Grafting helps pepper plants deal with drought

    Joining a high-yield pepper plant sapling to the roots of a strong and resistant variety could help pepper farmers cope with lower rainfall, a study has found. An experiment using the technique of merging two plants, known as grafting, resulted in higher fruit yield during periods of less rain. Plants also grew much better in salty soil, a by-product of drought, the researchers ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • How to use non-crop plants

    This is the fifth article in a six-part series providing practical information of an overall IPM program. Vineland investigates the role of non-crop plants for pest and disease management. These plants are not grown to sell, but only to create an environment that is detrimental to pests and diseases and/or beneficial to biological control ...

  • Biodiversity is the basis for Integrated Pest Management

    Integrated Pest Management (IPM) is now the norm in agriculture and horticulture. All stakeholders – national and European government agencies and public bodies, agriculture and horticulture organisations, businesses, universities and research institutes – agree with this statement. "More biodiversity and the use of resistant plants are crucial to the successful implementation of ...

  • Choice of winter cover crop mixture steers summer crop yield

    Scientists from Wageningen University & Research demonstrate that the productivity of a next main crop can be manipulated through the choice of species in a preceding winter cover crop mixture. They report their latest findings in the Journal of Applied Ecology of 2nd of June. With their publication, the scientist agree with recommendations of FAO to included cover crops in rotations, on top ...

  • The problem expands for avocado growers: 9 beetle species carry deadly fungus

    Many people love their avocados – not to mention guacamole dip. So it was bad enough when scientists said a beetle was ravaging avocado trees in South Florida. Then scientists found out that the redbay ambrosia beetle — originally determined to transmit laurel wilt — is rare in avocado groves but that six other beetle species could carry the laurel wilt pathogen. That’s ...

  • Whitefly, Disease, Drought, Unhealthy Soil, Solution Black Worm Castings!

    Spring is just around the corner, that meant it time to plant crops and start working in the garden. Unfortunately, there are several factors that can undermine all your hard work, drought, disease, unhealthy soil, and the Whitefly. Whiteflies are especially dangerous for plants. They carry many diseases and leave bend a Sooty Mold that can shut down photosynthesis and can ultimately ...


    By Vermitechnology Unlimited

  • Indian News Site Features Rivulis Irrigation CEO Speaking at Event in India

    The following article was featured on the website, Smart Indian Agriculture. Vivian Fernandes reports on some of the interesting ideas being thrown up at the Confederation of Indian Industry’s event in Chandigarh on how advances in ...


    By Rivulis Irrigation

  • New test can detect plant viruses faster, cheaper

    A new test could save time and money diagnosing plant viruses, some of which can destroy millions of dollars in crops each year in Florida, says a University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences researcher. In a newly published study, Jane Polston, a UF/IFAS plant pathology professor, examined several ways to detect the DNA genome of begomoviruses. These viruses have emerged ...

  • Cooler Weather Conditions, Late Planting, Impacts Insects on Crops

    Rainy, cooler weather experienced recently throughout the region means slugs may be on the rise in some field crops, says an entomologist with the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. The rains combined with colder temperatures are ideal slug weather, said Kelley Tilmon, a field crop entomologist with Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio ...


    By Ohio State University

  • Syngenta launches new biological seed treatment

    Syngenta today announced the launch of the EPIVIO brand family, a range of new biostimulants which address abiotic stresses through seed treatment. Over the last five years Syngenta has developed abiotic stress management testing capabilities to simulate drought, heat, cold and nutrient stresses. Seed treatment products resulting from this R&D platform are now commercialized under the ...


    By Syngenta

  • Florida citrus growers: 80 percent of trees infected by greening

    Florida’s citrus growers say as much as 90 percent of their acreage and 80 percent of their trees are infected by the deadly greening disease, which is making a huge dent in the state’s $10.7 billion citrus industry, a new University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences survey shows. The survey, conducted in March 2015, shows the first grower-based estimates of both ...

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