Plowing Articles

  • The Best Practices for Using Plant Residues

    Plant residue are crop materials such as stems, leaves, and roots, that are left on the field after the harvest. In the past, farmers considered crop residue to be trash, that was usually destroyed by fire. However, today this practice is not recommended and highly is not used by farmers. There are two different ways to manage crop residues. The first method is tillage prior planting when plant ...


    By Agrivi Ltd

  • MPPE for Schering Plough - Organon Oss (The Netherlands) case study

    Specifications: Pharmaceutical Raw Materials supplier Groundwater treatment Flowrate 40 m3/hr Aromatics, chlorinated hydrocarbons (250 ppm) Effluent < 0.5 ppm Fe 48 ppm, Ca 65 ppm Performance guaranteed ...

  • Disruptive Innovation Festival

    The Ellen MacArthur Foundation’s first-ever Distributive Innovation Festival debuts online Oct. 20. Over the course of four weeks, the DIF will provide an online space for entrepreneurs, businesses, thought leaders and learners from around the world to explore how we might shape a circular economy. DIF ...


    By Ensia

  • Co-operative, Massachusetts - case study

    Northeast Biodiesel of Greenfield, Massachusetts, USA,  is a community-owned manufacturing plant making biodiesel from recycled vegetable oil. It is majority owned by Co-op Power, a renewable energy co-operative owned by consumers in Massachusetts, Vermont and New York.  Co-op Power operates within a regional network of autonomous local organising councils to create a multi-class, ...


    By Green Fuels LTD

  • Paperless at Schering

    Schering-Plough has made the transition to a paperless system for managing instrument calibration records. Frankly, I applaud this initiative. Given the pharmaceutical manufacturing industry’s relatively cautious approach to adopting electronic records-keeping systems, Schering- Plough’s decision to dispense with paper in the critical (in terms of GMP) arena of calibration is ...


    By Prime Technologies, Inc.

  • Can We Prevent A Food Breakdown?

    Food & Water Security: Protecting our Most Precious Resources will be a major issue discussed at GLOBE 2014, taking place in Vancouver Canada march 26-28. This article by Lester R. Brown, reprinted here with the kind permission of the author, puts the issue of water and food security ...


    By GLOBE Foundation

  • Can We Prevent A Food Breakdown?

    By Lester R. Brown As food supplies have tightened, a new geopolitics of food has emerged—a world in which the global competition for land and water is intensifying and each country is fending for itself. We cannot claim that we are unaware of the trends that are undermining our food supply and thus our civilization. We know what we need ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Full Planet, Empty Plates: Chapter 2. The Ecology of Population Growth

    Throughout most of human existence, population growth has been so slow as to be imperceptible within a single generation. Reaching a global population of 1 billion in 1804 required the entire time since modern humans appeared on the scene. To add the second billion, it took until 1927, just over a century. Thirty-three years later, in 1960, world population reached 3 billion. Then the pace sped ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Re-coupling the carbon and water cycles by Natural Sequence Farming

    The techniques of Natural Sequence Farming (NSF) were developed during hands-on management of degraded farmland in the Upper Hunter Valley region of Australia. Early settlement of the continent by people with European cultural assumptions disrupted established interactions of water, soil, and plants resulting in lost fertility. Moreover, agricultural practices such as clearing, burning, ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Nitrogen, tillage, and crop rotation effects on carbon dioxide and methane fluxes from irrigated cropping systems

    Received for publication December 15, 2008. Long-term effects of tillage intensity, N fertilization, and crop rotation on carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) flux from semiarid irrigated soils are poorly understood. We evaluated effects of: (i) tillage intensity [no-till (NT) and conventional moldboard plow tillage (CT)] in a continuous corn rotation; (ii) N fertilization levels [0–246 kg N ...

  • Mitigation options for sediment and phosphorus loss from winter-sown arable crops

    Received for publication January 20, 2009. Sediment and P inputs to freshwaters from agriculture are a major problem in the United Kingdom (UK). This study investigated mitigation options for diffuse pollution losses from arable land. Field trials were undertaken at the hillslope scale over three winters at three UK sites with silt (Oxyaquic Hapludalf), sand (Udic Haplustept), and clay (Typic ...

  • Hwy E, Freedom, Wisconsin

    Wisconsin winters are notorious for the damage they can cause to roads. An example of winter’s influence was seen on Highway E, a winding, two-lane asphalt road that serves commuters between Little Chute and Oneida. Once called the worst stretch of road in Outagamie County, it was plagued by cracking and heaving during the winter months. Similar problems occur elsewhere in the region where ...


    By Presto Geosystems

  • Could food shortages bring down civilization?

    One of the toughest things for people to do is to anticipate sudden change. Typically we project the future by extrapolating from trends in the past. Much of the time this approach works well. But sometimes it fails spectacularly, and people are simply blindsided by events such as today’s economic crisis. For most of us, the idea that civilization itself could disintegrate probably seems ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Interactive effects of tillage and mineral fertilization on soil carbon profiles

    Both tillage and fertilizer management influence soil organic C (SOC) storage, but their interactive effects remain to be determined for various soil and climatic conditions. We evaluated the long-term effects of tillage (no-till, NT, and moldboard plowing, MP), and N and P fertilization on SOC stocks and concentrations in profiles of a clay loam soil (clayey, mixed, mesic Typic Humaquept). Corn ...

  • Soil microbial community change and recovery after one-time tillage of continuous no-till

    Continuous no-till (NT) results in soil improvements, primarily in the surface 5 cm of soil. One-time tillage may improve NT systems by inverting surface soil with less improved deeper soil. Research was conducted to determine the change in abundance of soil microbial groups after a one-time tillage of NT and their recovery dynamics. Experiments were conducted under rainfed corn (Zea mays L.) or ...

  • Continuous corn response to residue management and nitrogen fertilization

    Harvesting corn (Zea mays L.) residue in continuous corn (CC) may require changes in crop management for increased efficiency. Experiments were conducted in Illinois to determine how residue removal and tillage affect surface residue after planting and the response of CC to N fertilization. Partial removal of residue left 21 to 26% surface residue coverage with a chisel plow system, compared with ...

  • Characterization of preferential flow pathways through Paddy bunds with dye tracer tests

    In terraced paddy landscapes, water losses through the bunds surrounding paddy rice (Oryza sativa L.) fields may significantly reduce water use efficiency. The objective of this research was to identify the dominant pathways active for water flow and solute transport in bunds, and to detect differences between the bunds and adjacent field areas. Two earthen bunds aged 20 and 100 yr were ...

  • Change in Surface Soil Carbon under Rotated Corn in Eastern South Dakota

    A diversified crop rotation may reduce fertilizer N inputs for corn (Zea mays L.) and increase soil organic C (SOC). Our objectives were to determine the effects of crop rotation and fertilizer N on soil C within the surface soil (0–15-cm depth). Rotations were started in 1990 on a Barnes sandy clay loam near Brookings, SD. Measurements of SOC began in 1996. Primary tillage since 1996 was chisel ...

  • Tillage effects on water use and grain yield of winter wheat and green pea in rotation

    Under water-limited conditions, increasing water use efficiency (WUE) is essential for successful crop production. A 7-yr study (1977–1982, and 1985) to evaluate tillage and tillage timing effects on soil water storage, crop water use, and grain yield of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and spring green pea (Pisum sativum L.) in rotation, was conducted near Pendleton, OR. Treatments included ...

  • Effect of tillage and nitrogen rate on corn yield and nitrogen and phosphorus uptake in a corn-soybean rotation

    Understanding tillage, N, and P interactions can contribute to improved N and P utilization and crop response. This study examined the interaction effects of tillage and N rate of two N sources on N and P uptake by corn (Zea mays L.). The study was conducted on Kenyon loam (fine loamy, mixed, mesic Typic Hapludolls) soil at the Iowa State University Northeast Research and Demonstration Farm near ...

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