Soil Organic Matter News

  • Big Hanna produced compost meets the French standard NF U 44-051 for soil improver

    An analyze of the compost from our Big Hanna composters installed at Conseil General du val de Marne, France meets the French standard NF U 44-051 for soil improver. When the compost meets the NF U 44-051 standard it becomes a product and is no longer considered waste. It changes its nature. It can be used for the maintenance or restoration of soil organic matter and the improvement of its ...


    By Susteco AB

  • Farmers’ use of renewable fertilisers to be revolutionised by new research

    Farmers’ and growers’ confidence in digestate and compost has been given a welcome boost, as new ground-breaking research published today,  shows smart use of these renewable fertilisers can increase yields and reduce bills with no negative impact on crop quality or safety. The programme of field experiments,  ...

  • Increasing diversity through crop rotation boosts soil microbial biodiversity and productivity

    Planting a variety of crop species in rotation in agricultural fields increases the diversity of soil microbes below ground, recent research has found. This in turn positively affects soil organic matter, soil structure and aids the healthy functioning of the soil. The researchers say that rotational diversity can help farmers to grow crops in a more sustainable way that promotes soil stability. ...

  • New Tool Offers Growers Easy Option to Measure Soil Organic Matter Content

    Researchers with Ohio State University's College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences have developed a new tool that allows farmers to easily predict soil organic matter content and can help them make decisions about whether or not to sell crop residue. The tool can benefit growers by providing information for more timely planting and harvesting, reducing operating costs, increasing ...


    By Ohio State University

  • Ohio State Team Promotes Nature-based `ECO-farming`

    A team of scientists and educators from Ohio State University’sCollege of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciencesnow spells farming with three extra letters. The group studies, demonstrates and teaches about what it calls “ECO-farming,” a new approach aimed at boosting a farm’s production and profits while shrinking its environmental ...


    By Ohio State University

  • Can simple measures of labile soil organic matter predict corn performance?

    Organic matter is important for soil health and crop productivity. While an indicator of soil quality, a lot of organic matter is in extremely stable forms, and the nutrients in such forms are difficult for plants to use. The active, labile fraction, however, is a modest but important part of the organic matter. “The labile fraction is small – usually less than 20 or even 10 percent, ...

  • Agricultural Bacteria: Blowing in the Wind

    It was all too evident during the Dust Bowl what a disastrous impact wind can have on dry, unprotected topsoil. Now a new study has uncovered a less obvious, but still troubling, effect of wind: Not only can it carry away soil particles, but also the beneficial microbes that help build soil, detoxify contaminants, and recycle nutrients. Using a powerful DNA sequencing technique, called ...

  • Can one-time tillage improve no-till?

    A one-time tillage has no adverse effects on yield or soil properties on no-till land, according to field research conducted at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Although tillage is another expense for farmers and generally increases the risk of soil erosion, a one-time tillage may be performed to correct some problem, such as a perennial weed problem. The feasibility study was conducted for ...

  • Crop residues provide valuable protection for soil

    Removing wheat and sorghum crop residue after harvest, such as stalks, stubble and leaves, may cause more harm than good according to new research. Results indicate that removing residue can increase nutrient and sediment levels in water runoff, and decrease organic carbon stored in the soil. Crop residue left after harvest performs several ecosystem services. In particular it protects the soil ...

  • Nitrogen mysteries in urban grasslands

    Areas of turf-forming species created and maintained by humans for aesthetic and recreational (not grazing) purposes, i.e. “urban grasslands” are an extremely common, but poorly studied ecosystem type. There are over 150,000 km2of urban grasslands in the U.S. and many receive high rates of fertilizer, creating concerns about nutrient runoff to streams, lakes, and estuaries and emissions of ...

  • Strategic organic matter throughput helps to build soil carbon and boost crop yields

    Potential improvement in crop yields and reduced greenhouse gas emissions were among the benefits of increased soil organic matter throughput according to the findings of a project funded by growers and the Australian Government through the Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC) and the Victorian Department of Primary Industries (DPI). The relationships between organic matter inputs ...

  • Global warming changing organic matter in soil

    New research shows that we should be looking to the ground, not the sky, to see where climate change could have its most perilous impact on life on Earth. Scientists at the University of Toronto Scarborough have published research findings in the prestigious journal, Nature Geoscience, that show global warming actually changes the molecular structure of organic matter in soil. 'Soil contains more ...


    By University of Toronto

  • A model to measure soil health in the era of bioenergy

    One of the biggest threats to today’s farmlands is the loss of soil organic carbon (SOC) and soil organic matter (SOM) from poor land-management practices. The presence of these materials is essential as they do everything from providing plants with proper nutrients to filtering harmful chemical compounds to the prevention of soil erosion. Sustainable management practices for crop residues are ...

  • Experiment demonstrates 110 years of sustainable agriculture

    A plot of land on the campus of Auburn University shows that 110 years of sustainable farming practices can produce similar cotton crops to those using other methods.  In 1896, Professor J.F. Duggar at the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama (now Auburn University) started an experiment to test his theories that sustainable cotton production was possible on Alabama soils if ...

  • A little nitrogen can go a long way

    Varying the rate of crop production inputs such as fertilizer and seed makes intuitive sense, as farmers have long observed differences in crop yield in various areas of a single field. The availability of spatial yield information from combines equipped with yield monitors has provided a good resource for improved management. So, optimizing inputs to match yield potential of different areas ...

  • America`s Emerging Bioeconomy

    AMES, Iowa, August 30, 2007 (ENS) - Robert Anex wants to know what would happen if the increasing demand for ethanol prompts American farmers to decide against crop rotation and plant corn on the same fields, year after year. This spring farmers responded to the ethanol industry's demand for grain by increasing their corn acreage by 19 percent over last year, according to U.S. ...

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