Vegetables Growing News

  • In black and white: Zebra Chip report vindicates growers

    The Senate committee investigating the proposal to import potatoes from New Zealand for processing handed down its report yesterday sharing industry’s disappointment and lack of confidence in the work conducted by the Department of Agriculture’s (DA) Biosecurity Department.  AUSVEG has today welcomed the committee’s comments that they share a number of concerns and lack ...


    By AUSVEG

  • Victoria to host veggie roadshow

    Victorian vegetable growers will have their say on a range of issues affecting the vegetable industry, at a series of free levy payer meetings to be held next week as part of a nationwide Regional Roadshow by AUSVEG and Horticulture Australia Limited. Two meetings will be held in the state’s principal vegetable growing regions, with the first taking place in Werribee on Monday 17 March at ...


    By AUSVEG

  • CAP reform: European Commission adopts delegated acts

    The European Commission adopted today the first package of delegated acts for the reform of the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) aiming at making the CAP fairer, greener and more targeted. Those texts supplement the four basic acts adopted on 13 December 2013 by the European Parliament and the Council for the reform of the CAP. Dacian Cioloş, European Commissioner for Agriculture and Rural ...


    By Europa Press Room

  • Vegetable Australian industry welcomes $50 million increase in export development scheme

    AUSVEG has welcomed a $50 million boost to the Export Market Development Grants (EMDG) scheme, after Minister for Trade and Investment, the Hon. Andrew Robb MP, today introduced legislation into Parliament to facilitate the increase and make the program more accessible to businesses. The threshold of expenses required for a firm to become eligible for a grant will be reduced from $20,000 to ...


    By AUSVEG

  • `Vegetable IAC’s independence is absolute`

    AUSVEG has today hit back at a recent ABC story claiming that horticulture’s Industry Advisory Committees (IACs) are “stacked with lobby groups”, stating that the independence of the Vegetable Industry Advisory Committee (IAC) is absolute. “Recent claims by ABC Rural that the Vegetable IAC is ‘stacked’ with Members of the Peak Industry Body are ridiculous. ...


    By AUSVEG

  • The big red hand picks Australian vegetables for freezing

    AUSVEG, the National Peak Industry body representing Australian vegetable and potato growers, has welcomed an initiative rolled out on Australia Day by retailer Coles to replace all of its Smart Buy frozen vegetables with 100 per cent Australian grown vegetables and potatoes. The agreement comes in the form of a five-year contract that the retailer has inked with Simplot, who operate vegetable ...


    By AUSVEG

  • Strengthening new market opportunities in local and regional food systems

    Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack joined Farmer Veteran Coalition Executive Director Michael O'Gorman and Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner James Comer to highlight the rapid growth of local and regional marketing opportunities in American agriculture. Local and regional markets provide new opportunity in agriculture and expanded availability of fresh, local foods for all Americans. Link to ...

  • EU and FAO help six countries achieve Millennium Development Goal on hunger

    Less than two years before the deadline set to achieve international development goals, the European Union (EU) and FAO step up their efforts to reduce world hunger assisting two million people in six countries with agricultural development activities worth nearly €60 million. The funding comes from a €1 billion EU initiative that aims to foster speedier progress towards the Millennium ...

  • Deforestation reduces rainfall in tropics, says study

    Large-scale deforestation in tropical rainforests can dramatically reduce rainfall rates both locally and thousands of kilometres away, according to a study published in Nature yesterday (5 September). This could have a potentially devastating impact on communities living in or close to the Amazon and Congo rainforests. This drop occurs because ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Jane Goodall`s Roots & Shoots and Earth protect announce winners of international video contest

    Jane Goodall's Roots & Shoots, the Jane Goodall Institute's global environmental and humanitarian program for young people from preschool through university, and Earth Protect are pleased to announce the winners of the On the Edge: Hope for Animals and Their World Young Filmmakers Contest. A part of Roots & Shoots' current campaign focusing on endangered species and biodiversity, the ...

  • Apples top new `Dirty Dozen` list

    Environmental Working Group has released the seventh edition of its Shopper's Guide to Pesticides in Produce with updated information on 53 fruits and vegetables and their total pesticide loads. EWG highlights the worst offenders with its "Dirty Dozen" list and the cleanest conventional produce with its "Clean 15" list. Analysts at EWG synthesized data collected from the U.S. Department of ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

  • Annie`s launches `Root 4 Kids` Campaign encouraging kids nationwide to dig real food

    Annie's, maker of all-natural and organic comfort foods, snacks and cereals, today announced the launch of "Root 4 Kids," a cause-related campaign calling upon parents and teachers nationwide to help kids "dig" or learn about new vegetables in fall 2010 and plant new vegetables in spring 2011. Annie's goal: one million kids digging and planting new veggies now through harvest 2011. To help reach ...

  • Bon Appetit Management Company asks everyone to harvest near home

    Eight years before the New Oxford American Dictionary added the word "locavore" to its pages, Bon Appétit Management Company committed to using local foods on its college, corporate and specialty café menus. In 1999, Bon Appétit launched its Farm to Fork program, a company-wide commitment to buy from small, owner-operated farms located within 150 miles of their cafés. ...

  • Spurred by warming climate - beetles threaten coffee crops

    The highlands of southwestern Ethiopia should be ideal for growing coffee. After all, this is the region where coffee first originated hundreds of years ago. But although coffee remains Ethiopia's number one export, the nation's coffee farmers have been struggling. The Arabica coffee grown in Ethiopia and Latin America is an especially climate-sensitive crop. It requires just the right amount of ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

  • Finding vegetables in unexpected places

    Urban agriculture, or urban farming, is becoming more common not only in Detroit-where some say the trend began-but around the country. Urban farms range from small-scale vegetable gardens in abandoned lots to larger operations with hoop houses and honeybees. Community leaders, unemployed workers, and families are hoping that urban farming can help address many of the problems of American inner ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

  • VEPOWER signs agreement with Jatropha Africa for 50,000 hectares

    VEPOWER Limited has entered into an exclusivity agreement with Jatropha Africa with the goal of financing the Company’s 50,000 hectare plantation in Ghana, West Africa.  VEPOWER will thus secure more than 40,000 tonnes of crude bio-fuel. VEPOWER is quickly emerging as one of Europe’s leading sustainable energy companies.  The business is built around the expertise of CEO ...

  • Lending promise featured in April dining for women program

    Lending Promise Inc., a nonprofit organization that offers microcredit - small loans of $100 or less - to poor mothers in Nepal and India, is the featured organization at April programs of more than 180 chapters of Dining For Women (DFW) in the U.S., Canada and Mexico. Dining for Women empowers poor women by funding programs fostering good health, education, and economic self-sufficiency and ...

  • Reinforcement of soil by plant roots

    Landslides have devastating impacts across the globe resulting in the loss of life and the destruction of billions of dollars in infrastructure. Soil erosion from wind and water threatens food production, pollutes the environment, and can make living in major cities such as Beijing almost unbearable during dust storms. Just like the great dust bowl of the 1930s, many instances of soil erosion and ...

  • How much are consumers willing to pay to reduce pesticide use?

    Many countries would like to decrease their pesticide use but are concerned about the accompanying cost. A recent study reveals that consumers are willing to pay more for food produced with fewer or no pesticides. The impact of pesticides continues to be a subject of political debate at both a national and European level. In 2006, the European Commission launched a strategy to improve the use of ...

  • Tropical soil carbon sink under threat

    There are strong concerns that the conversion of tropical forests into land for agriculture or plantations has negative effects on the carbon budget. A new study conducted in South-East Asia reveals that moderate or heavy disturbance of tropical forests can damage fine root structures, which in turn reduce carbon transfer to the soil. Tropical forests are being converted into agricultural land or ...

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