Forest Energy Articles

  • A flying river? How the Amazon Forest produces the largest flying river in the world

    The Amazon Rainforest is worldwide known for its extraordinary biodiversity and large rivers. The facts speak for themselves. It is the largest tropical forest in the world, covering five million and a half square kilometers in nine countries, including Brazil, which presents 60% of the forest cover. It presents the highest biodiversity among all tropical forests in the world. One in ten known ...

  • In 2016, rain forest conservation needs to focus on these two things

    Giving logged areas a chance to recover and limiting the expansion of roads are vital to ensuring the health of these important ecosystems. When you look to the year ahead, what do you see? Ensia recently invited eight global thought leaders to share their vision for the environment as it relates to business, culture, ecosystems, energy, food, health, water and the world ( ...


    By Ensia

  • Observations and snow model simulations of winter energy balance terms within and between different coniferous forests in southern boreal Finland

    Variation of canopy properties between different forest types is seldom taken into account in hydrological and climate models, and consideration of variation inside a forest is normally omitted. In this work, three data sets on near surface energy balance terms (incoming shortwave and longwave radiation; air and snow–soil interface temperatures) were collected in the southern boreal coniferous ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • To everyone’s surprise, forests are returning to Malawi. Here’s why.

    The East African country of Malawi epitomizes the global problem of deforestation. Now, there are signs it could epitomize the solution, too, as government, community members and grassroots organizations tackle the problem together. Some 95 percent of rural Malawian households depend on wood for necessities such as cooking, clean water and sanitation. Many Malawians also depend on the ...


    By Ensia

  • The 11 most important forests in the world

    You might not think of eastern Australia as one of the hot spots of global deforestation. But it ranks right up there with the Amazon and Sumatra in a new report by WWF highlighting key areas of focus for efforts to protect forestlands around the world. Forests are of particular importance to global efforts to maintain a healthy environment because they contain much of the world’s ...


    By Ensia

  • Why Our Buildings Should Be Made From Wood

    If done correctly, using wood for buildings would have a number of environmental benefits without loss of biodiversity or carbon storage capacity. Although it may seem counterintuitive, it would be better if we built buildings from wood than from concrete, brick, aluminium and steel. We use millions of tons of these modern materials every year. They have many ...


    By Ensia

  • Living within Earth`s “Planetary Boundaries”

    Borneo’s lowland rainforests are one of the most biodiverse regions on earth, home to unique habitats, thousands of species of plants, and animals like Proboscis monkeys, Sumatran rhinoceroses, and orangutans. Yet more than 75 percent of its forests have been destroyed in recent decades. “Now it looks like something out of Lord of the Rings, due to hardwood harvesting and huge palm ...

  • North American forest biomass helps EU hit 2020 energy targets

    BC Bioenergy Network ("BCBN"), a provincially-funded leader in the growing bioenergy sector in British Columbia and the Wood Pellet Association of Canada ("WPAC"), have released a report that documents Canada's contribution to the EU's renewable energy targets. The study modeled forest carbon dynamics and determined that the production of energy from sustainable solid biomass rapidly mitigates ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

  • Safeguarding forests and People: A framework for designing a national system to implement REDD+ safeguards

    Background Around the world, members of governments, civil society, and the private sector are grappling with how to design and implement initiatives that reduce greenhouse gas emissions by slowing, halting, and reversing forest loss. These efforts have been spurred at least in part by the agreements onlong-term cooperative action (LCA) that Parties to the United Nations Framework ...

  • Seeing Green: Saving Forests or Food Prices?

    A growing population and rapid development will put a strain on land used to grow food over the next century. But if reforestation is used to avoid climate change it will create further strain, says a new MIT study. Written by Vicki Ekstrom.You can read the original new in MIT ...

  • Rio Summit may `ignore` forests, warn scientists

    Forests have barely been mentioned in the draft of the international agreement to be made at the Rio+20 Earth Summit later this year (20-22 June), the body that represents 15,000 of the world's forest researchers has complained. ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • LULUCF: The ‘No Loopholes’ environmental integrity package for Ministers

    The Forestry and Land Use sector (LULUCF) is responsible for at least 30% of global emissions and has huge emission reduction potential. Loopholes in coverage across land and forests of developed countries currently undermine emissions reduction and the integrity of targets. Ministers, here are your options on the table to contribute to ambitious emissions reductions with LULUCF. More ...


    By Wetlands International

  • Learning from China: Why the existing economic model will fail

    For almost as long as I can remember we have been saying that the United States, with 5 percent of the world’s people, consumes a third or more of the earth’s resources. That was true. It is no longer true. Today China consumes more basic resources than the United States does. Among the key commodities such as grain, meat, oil, coal, and steel, China consumes more of each than the ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Development of eco-efficiency in Finnish forest industry: 1997-2007

    In this article I reconsider if eco-efficiency (EE) concept is suitable practical tool and instrument to measure the progress towards sustainable development (SD) and the aims of industrial ecology in forest industries. The SD strives for material and energy metabolism that is within the ecological carrying and regeneration capacity of the nature. The aim of eco-efficiency is commonly to reduce ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Protecting and restoring forests

    Protecting the earth’s nearly 4 billion hectares of remaining forests and replanting those already lost are both essential for restoring the earth’s health, an important foundation for the new economy. Reducing rainfall runoff and the associated flooding and soil erosion, recycling rainfall inland, and restoring aquifer recharge depend on simultaneously reducing pressure on forests and on ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Shrinking forests: The many costs

    In early December 2004, Philippine President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo 'ordered the military and police to crack down on illegal logging, after flash floods and landslides, triggered by rampant deforestation, killed nearly 340 people,' according to news reports. Fifteen years earlier, in 1989, the government of Thailand announced a nationwide ban on tree cutting following severe flooding and the ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Industrial symbiosis in the Swedish forest industry

    In the research field of Industrial Symbiosis (IS), by-product synergies between industries have been studied with the objective of decreasing the environmental impact of industrial activity and simultaneously increasing profit for the companies involved. Many theoretical models and definitions have been suggested, although only a limited number of examples are documented in the literature. ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • The impact of subsidies on efficiency and production: empirical test of forestry in Japan

    This study evaluates efficiency of forest management in Japan. Our results show that efficiency of forest management decreases over 25 years period from 1975 to 2000 on an average. The study indicates a substantial variation in efficiency across prefectures with a potential for output saving in the range of 40% on an average. Our econometric results seem to support the hypothesis that government ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

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