Melon Farming News

  • Grafting helps pepper plants deal with drought

    Joining a high-yield pepper plant sapling to the roots of a strong and resistant variety could help pepper farmers cope with lower rainfall, a study has found. An experiment using the technique of merging two plants, known as grafting, resulted in higher fruit yield during periods of less rain. Plants also grew much better in salty soil, a by-product of drought, the researchers ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Coral calcium & worm castings, reduce blossom end rot disease

    A destructive disease affecting many gardens and farms this year is blossom end rot. Causing great concern for vegetables such as squash, watermelon, eggplant, peppers, and tomato. This disease affects gardens year after year. By the time gardeners notice black spots on their fruit or vegetables the situation is severe. To prevent further damage, immediate action is required. What is Blossom End ...


    By Vermitechnology Unlimited

  • Hudson Valley organic farm produces seeds largely by hand

    Drying corn stalks wilt in late summer sun as Ken Greene tours his crops. Calendula flowers are past bloom and brown. Melon leaves lay crinkled by the dirt. Plants have, literally, gone to seed. A perfect picture for an organic seed harvest. "It looks like hell now, but it's actually good for the seeds," said Greene, co-founder of the Hudson Valley Seed Library. The small business 70 miles ...


    By Associated Press

  • EPA plans temporary pesticide restrictions while bees feed

    If honeybees are busy pollinating large, blooming croplands, farmers wanting to spray toxic pesticides will soon have to buzz off, the Environmental Protection Agency is proposing. A federal rule to be proposed Thursday would create temporary pesticide-free zones when certain plants are in bloom around bees that are trucked from farm to farm ...


    By Associated Press

  • Plant Life about melons, apple scab and big data

    The main article in the January issue of Plant Life is titled 'Understanding melons' and Sander Peters, bio-informatics scientist at Wageningen UR, is interviewed about the '100 Melon genome project'. Also scientist Jürgen Kohl tells about the Select Biocontrol method and you can read about the workshop 'Data-driven innovations in the agri-food industries', on 18 and 19 March in Wageningen. ...

  • First MELOFEED® technical meetings : all you always wanted to know about oxidative stress!

    In 2012, Lallemand Animal Nutrition was launching MELOFEED®*, an innovative and unique antioxidant solution based on a concentrated melon juice naturally rich in SOD (antioxidant enzyme: superoxyde dismutase). At the same time, the company entered eponymous three-year collaborative research project with INRA and Bionov, the company who discovered this original melon variety (non GMO) and ...


    By Lallemand Animal Nutrition

  • Georgia Crop Farmer Philip Grimes Named Swisher Sweets/Sunbelt Expo Southeastern Farmer of the Year for 2014

    Philip Grimes, a farmer from Tifton, Georgia who is known for his conservation practices and high crop yields, has been selected as the overall winner of the Swisher Sweets/Sunbelt Expo Southeastern Farmer of the Year award for 2014. Grimes was named as the overall winner during the Willie B. Withers Luncheon held during the opening day of the 2014 Sunbelt Ag Expo farm ...


    By Sunbelt Ag Expo

  • EPA Registers New Nematicide Alternative to Restricted-Use Soil Fumigants, Including Methyl Bromide

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is registering a new active ingredient, fluensulfone, a non-fumigant nematicide that provides lower-risk chemical control of nematodes than methyl bromide and other Restricted Use soil fumigants. Under the Montreal Protocol, EPA has phased out methyl bromide because its use depletes the ozone layer. Nematodes are difficult to control and can cause ...

  • US senator joins critics of federal cattle roundup

    A Republican U.S. senator added his voice Wednesday to critics of a federal cattle roundup fought by a Nevada rancher who claims longstanding grazing rights on remote public rangeland about 80 miles northeast of Las Vegas Sen. Dean Heller of Nevada said he told new U.S. Bureau of Land Management chief Neil Kornze in Washington, D.C., that law-abiding Nevadans shouldn't be penalized by an ...


    By Associated Press

  • Syngenta to sell US fresh produce business

    Syngenta announced today that it has signed an agreement to sell its Dulcinea Farms business ("Dulcinea") to Pacific Trellis Fruit LLC ("Pacific Trellis"), a US-based international grower and marketer of fresh produce. Based in California, Dulcinea was formed in 2004 in partnership with Tanimura & Antle, initially as a vehicle for branding proprietary mini-watermelon and specialty melon ...


    By Syngenta

  • Farmers Arrested Following Deadly 2011 Listeria Outbreak

    Last month, NBC News published a report that the two brothers who own a cantaloupe farm in Colorado that was implicated in a 2011 Listeria outbreak had been arrested on misdemeanor charges. The charges were related to introducing adulterated food into interstate commerce. The contaminated cantaloupe was consumed in 28 states and was one of the deadliest outbreaks of a foodborne ...


    By EMSL Analytical, Inc.

  • Microbes `cheaper, fairer` for boosting yields than GM

    Adapting microbes that dramatically increase crop yields while reducing demand for fertilisers and pesticides through selective breeding or genetic engineering could be cheaper and more flexible than genetically modifying plants themselves, says an author of a report. Microbes, such as beneficial bacteria, fungi and viruses, could be ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Feeding the 5000 launches the first Disco Soup in the United States on September 20, 2013

    Feeding the 5000 launches the first Disco Soup in the United States on Friday, September 20, 2013 at SuperPier (15th Street and West Side Highway), from 5:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. More than 1200 kilograms (over 1,000 pounds) of food that would have otherwise been wasted will be rescued, prepared and shared among hundreds of participants, with surplus food donated ...

  • Beekeepers Are Critical to Economy

    Today, beekeepers from across the country gathered at a national conference, with environmental organizations at their side, to draw attention to the growing plight facing their industry –the decline of honey bees – a problem that has far reaching implications for the U.S. economy. "Bees and other pollinators are the underpinnings of a successful agricultural economy," said ...


    By Beyond Pesticides

  • Death Toll Rises to 13 in Listeria Cantaloupe Outbreak

    13 people are dead and 72 sickened from cantaloupes contaminated with the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) confirmed Monday morning. The outbreak is one of the most deadly in recent years. The contaminated melons came from the family-owned Jensen Farms in Holly, Colorado and were shipped between July 29 and September 10. The Food and Drug ...


    By EMSL Analytical, Inc.

  • Seawater greenhouse plan for Jordan

    Seawater greenhouses, solar power plants and other new green technologies will be brought together in Jordan in an attempt to turn its desert into a producer of crops, fresh water and electricity. The governments of Jordan and Norway signed an agreement last month (11 January) to build a 20-hectare demonstration centre near Aqaba on the Red Sea. They will work with the Aqaba Special Economic Zone ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • U.S. agency phasing out insecticide Endosulfan

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ruled on Wednesday to end all uses of the insecticide endosulfan. In light of recent data, the EPA decided that the 50-year-old chemical is too dangerous for farm workers and wildlife. "Risks faced by workers are greater than previously known," an EPA statement said. The international community is currently considering adding endosulfan to the ...


    By Worldwatch Institute

  • It never rains in California...

    They came by the thousands, united in one common goal - to protest reduced water deliveries to one of the world’s major agricultural regions. Growers, farm workers, community leaders, politicians and environmental activists participated in a four-day, 50-mile 'March for Water' in California’s Central Valley last week to protect an industry vital to central and southern California. One clear ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

  • Less nitrogen could increase profit & sustainability

    More fertilizer doesn't always mean more profit. That's one conclusion from a 10-year study conducted by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists at the agency’s Soil Plant Nutrient Research Unit in Fort Collins, Colo., and colleagues at Colorado State University. From 1998 to 2008, the researchers evaluated and compared potential management strategies for reducing nitrogen and nitrate ...

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