Photosynthesis Articles

  • Photodamaged Chloroplasts are Targets of Cellular Garbage Disposal

    Autophagy, or "self eating," is the process cells use to consume unwanted intracellular structures such as damaged organelles, excess membranes, and unneeded proteins (Mizushima and Komatsu, 2011). Typically, the unwanted structure becomes surrounded by an autophagosomal membrane, which then fuses with the membrane of either the vacuole (yeast and plants) or the lysosome (animals) to deliver its ...


    By H Smith Plastics LTD

  • Nitrogen and phosphorus pollution alter the mutual relationship between corals and algae

    phosphorus pollution change the relationship between the pistillata and the algae living inside its tissues, a recent study has found. The researchers say the pollutants, mainly from urban and agricultural discharges, affect algae photosynthesis and the essential transfer of carbon from algae to the coral. Nitrogen and phosphorus pollution change the relationship between the tropical coral ...

  • Extreme Makeover: Photosynthesis Edition

    Plants are far better than humans at turning sunlight into food. But they’re not nearly as good as they could be: Thanks to quirks in the systems that have evolved to capture solar energy and use it to build sugars from carbon dioxide and water, the conversion efficiency of photosynthesis is but a few percent at best. With the need to produce more crops growing even faster than human ...


    By Ensia

  • Better photosynthesis for a better world?

    There’s no question that plants are better than most other life forms at converting carbon dioxide and sunlight into the sugars that form the basis of our global food web — and eventually, humans’ entire food supply. But fact of the matter is, with conversion rates hovering around 2 percent for our best crop fields, they’re by no means great. Even a slight increase in the ...


    By Ensia

  • Recovery of photosynthesis and growth rate in green, blue–green, and diatom algae after exposure to atrazine

    We evaluated the recovery of photosynthesis and growth rate in green (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata), blue‐green (Anabaena flos‐aquae), and diatom (Navicula pelliculosa) algae after pulsed exposure to atrazine. Subsequent to a grow‐up period of 24 to 72 h to establish requisite cell density for adequate signal strength to measure photosystem II (PSII) quantum yield, algae were exposed to a ...


    By John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • CIRAS-2 Export function-simplified data format with numerical and graphical data views

    Perhaps some of the most exciting moments for CIRAS-2 Portable Photosynthesis System users come when the time arrives to view meaningful data sets. What many new users will not realize is that they have the option of viewing these data in two formats: raw CIRAS-2 format (.dat) and a much streamlined Export format (.tab). Both formats easily and automatically import and parse into spreadsheet ...


    By PP Systems

  • Exergy analyses of the biochemical processes of photosynthesis

    This paper gives the exergy analyses of the main biochemical processes of photosynthesis in green plants. In the light reactions, photosystem I, photosystem II, and ATP-synthesis are found to operate at exergy efficiencies of 50%, 68% and 81%, respectively, so that 48% of the exergy of directly utilised solar photons is converted to biochemical energy carriers. Subsequently, in the dark ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Nitric Oxide as a signaling factor to upregulate the death-specific protein in a marine diatom, skeletonema costatum, during blockage of electron flow in photosynthesis

    To determine the physiological functions of a novel death-specific protein gene, Skeletonema costatum DSP-1 (ScDSP-1) in a marine diatom, Skeletonema costatum, the mRNA abundance of ScDSP-1 was measured in cultures subjected to light manipulation and treatments with various chemicals. When cells were transferred to a dim light intensity of 15 µmol m–2 s–1, ScDSP-1 mRNA levels showed a transient ...

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