Plant Breeding News

  • A step forward to making crops tolerant to severe drought

    An international consortium of researchers led by Wageningen University & Research in the Netherlands, has sequenced the genome of the ‘resurrection plant’ Xerophyta viscosa. Today the team publishes the DNA sequence in Nature Plants. In their paper, the team reveals a genetic ‘footprint’ of the amazing ability of this plant to tolerate severe drought for long periods ...

  • Maize breeders benefit from using drones

    Using drone technology could cut labour and costs spent in collecting data for maize breeding by at least ten per cent, preliminary findings of a project shows.   With increased demand for better seeds to adapt to changing climate, breeders have turned to unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) also known as drones for ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • LeeAgra 2017 Product Catalog

    With your crop on the line you need durable farm equipment. At LeeAgra we pride ourselves on building the most durable products on the market today. In recent years growers have struggled with resistant weeds that can’t be controlled by spraying over the top of the crop. Farmers want a small spot sprayer similar to the ones we built in the 1990s. With 15in. tires and wheels, durable ...


    By LeeAgra, Inc.

  • Finalists Announced for the World Agri-Tech Demo Day

    Rethink Events, hosts of San Francisco’s upcoming World Agri-Tech Innovation Summit, together with Royse AgTech Innovation Network, are delighted to announce the twelve companies selected to pitch their ag and food-tech solutions to local VCs at the newly launched “World Agri-Tech Demo Day”. The Demo Day, taking place on March 27, offers an opportunity to very early-stage, ...


    By Rethink Events Ltd.

  • Faster and better breeding of sustainable and healthy quinoa

    An international team of scientists, including quinoa breeding experts from Wageningen University & Research, published the complete DNA sequence of quinoa – the food crop that is conquering the world from South America – in Nature magazine on 8 February 2017. Quinoa is rich in essential amino acids and nutritional fibres and does not contain gluten. The crop is important to ...

  • Scientific publication in Plant Physiology including WIWAM xy

    Although the response of plants exposed to severe drought stress has been studied extensively, little is known about how plants adapt their growth under mild drought stress conditions. Here, we analyzed the leaf and rosette growth response of six Arabidopsis thaliana accessions originating from different geographic regions, when exposed to mild drought stress. The automated phenotyping platform ...


    By SMO bvba - WIWAM

  • Cement develops an appetite for C02

    Three new studies illuminate the sheer complexity of the aspect of climate science known as the carbon cycle − how carbon dioxide gets into the atmosphere and out again. Sometimes, human agency is at work, but nature takes care of it anyway – as one of the studies reveals in the case of cement, the world’s most widely-used building material. Zhu Liu, postdoctoral scholar at ...


    By Climate News Network

  • `We need a new approach for better soil`

    ‘Dutch agricultural soils are not future-proof’ was a widely accepted statement at the final meeting of the Public Private Partnership (PPP) Sustainable Soil. Breeders, chain partners, suppliers, the government and the science sector see a gradual deterioration in soil quality and are joining forces within the PPP to find a solution. “It isn’t a simple matter,” says ...

  • New Agreement between John Deere and Scherer Design Engineering

    Deere & Company announces a joint development agreement with Scherer Design Engineering, Inc. to develop and commercialize kernel processing solutions for self-propelled forage harvesters. "Deere is committed to developing industry leading kernel processing solutions with the goal to drive higher milk production in dairy cows," says Jon Chase, global director, ...


    By John Deere

  • Upcoming webinar on biotechnology discovery CRISPR

    Next Wednesday, September 21, the Agricultural & Food Law Consortium will present CRISPR: A Biotechnology Breakthrough and an Inventorship Quandary, as part of its monthly webinar series. The one-hour program starts at 12 noon ET and sign-in information is available here. A recent biotechnology discovery, CRISPR, may influence ...

  • Sayonara, kudzu bug?

    Adam Bray has spent a lot of time with kudzu bugs. “At night I would see them crawling when I closed my eyes,” he jokes. The kudzu bug originated in east Asia and India and showed up in Georgia, Bray’s home state, in 2009. And like its viney plant namesake, the kudzu bug has earned a negative reputation. “Everybody in Georgia knows about the kudzu bug,” Bray says. ...


    By American Society of Agronomy

  • US Environmentalist And Organic Crop Farm Groups Want Overhaul Of Federal Biotechnology Strategy

    On August 3, 2016, 24 farmer and public interest organizations wrote to the Obama Administration expressing their disappointment with the direction that the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) has taken with the proposed modernization of the Coordinated Framework for ...


    By Bergeson & Campbell, P.C.

  • ESA is recruiting a Technical Manager “Plant Breeding and Variety Registration”

    ESA European Seed Association (www.euroseeds.eu ) is recruiting a Technical Manager “Plant Breeding and Variety Registration” to work full time at the ESA General Secretariat’s office in Brussels, Belgium Job description: The Technical Manager “Plant Breeding and Variety Registration” will ...

  • British Crop Production Council challenges Green Alliance`s opposition to glyphosate and GM crops

    Dr Colin Ruscoe, chairman of BCPC, has contacted Keith Taylor, Green MEP for SE England, to challenge the 'Green Alliance of 46 MEPs opposed to renewal of glyphosate licences. The EU Standing Committee on Plants, Animals, Food and Feed continues to be deadlocked over renewal of licences for ...


  • GM crops can thrive as climate warms

    Genetically engineering photosynthesis in plants could take advantage of rising global temperatures and increased levels of carbon dioxide, US scientists say. They believe this could achieve much higher yields on the same amount of land and help to stave off the prospect of widespread hunger as human populations increase. Researchers at ...


    By Climate News Network

  • EPA OIG Will Evaluate EPA’s Management of Resistance Issues Related to Herbicide Tolerant GE Crops

    On March 25, 2016, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Office of Inspector General (OIG) sent a memorandum to Jim Jones, Assistant Administrator, Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention (OCSPP), announcing that it plans to begin preliminary research to assess EPA’s management and oversight of resistance issues related to herbicide tolerant genetically ...


    By Bergeson & Campbell, P.C.

  • Independent variety trials show productivity of wheat varieties continues to increase

    Nowhere in the world is the average grain yield as high as in the Netherlands, where it is over ten tonnes per hectare. Research by Wageningen UR shows that the introduction of new varieties has caused yields to increase by approximately 8 to 10 per cent per decade. Converted to a hectare of winter wheat, this represents an increase of 800 to 1,000 kilograms; a huge achievement for breeders of ...

  • Some but not all plants can defend themselves against disease on saline soil

    Some plants with resistance against a specific disease are also able to defend themselves effectively when they are stressed due to, for example, drought or saline soil. At the same time, the resistance of other plants no longer functions in these very same conditions. Although this had been assumed for some time, Wageningen scientist Christos Kissoudis is the first person to show why. As a ...

  • Rubisco activase best clue for better photosynthesis in fluctuating light

    Scientists and plant breeders who are aiming to improve food production by improving photosynthesis in crop plants, would make a good choice if they chose to change the composition and concentration of the protein Rubisco activase. In conditions where light intensity changes often and strongly, Rubisco activase is an important limiting factor in boosting the photosynthesis process when light ...

  • Purple limes and blood oranges could be next for Florida citrus

    University of Florida horticulture scientist Manjul Dutt is hoping to turn your next margarita on its head by making it a lovely lavender instead of passé pale green.  Dutt and Jude Grosser from the UF Citrus Research and Education Center are developing genetically engineered limes containing some similar genetic factors that are expressed in grape skin and blood orange pulp. ...

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