Plant Pathology News

  • Dealing with difficult powdery mildew infections on ornamental crops

    We are now at the peak of the powdery mildew season and, with increasing temperatures and dry weather conditions, susceptible crops are likely to be at high risk of infection. The pathogen There are five different powdery mildew species which attack ornamental crops in the UK. Erysiphe ssp. – this pathogen is mainly ...


    By Certis UK

  • Ambrosia beetle spreads dangerous avocado pathogen

    As the laurel wilt pathogen casts a cloud over the $100-million-a-year Florida avocado industry, University of Florida researchers continue to look for clues to prevent the pathogen from spreading. The main culprit has been the redbay ambrosia beetle, which has infected millions of native redbay and swampbay trees with the laurel wilt pathogen, but it is rarely seen in commercial avocado ...


    By University of Florida

  • Agrinos To Open State-of-the-Art Microbial Crop Input Production Facility in Oregon

    Agrinos, a leading biological crop input provider committed to improving the productivity and sustainability of agriculture worldwide, announces the construction of a new, state-of-the-art production facility in Clackamas, Oregon. The 28,000 square-foot facility near Portland, Ore., will accommodate increased production capacity for the Agrinos line of proprietary High Yield Technology® ...


    By Agrinos Inc

  • New method may help detect avocado pathogen earlier

    University of Florida researchers have found an algorithm to help them detect laurel wilt, the deadly pathogen that threatens Florida’s $100 million-a-year avocado industry. Reza Ehsani, an associate professor of agricultural and biological engineering, said the algorithm finds laurel wilt-infected avocado trees before symptoms are visible to the naked eye. About 500 growers produce ...

  • Resistance genes from wild relatives of crops offer opportunities for more sustainable agriculture worldwidew

    Growing crops with stacks of two or more resistance genes from closely related species, introduced into the crop via for instance genetic engineering, combined with the simultaneous introduction of resistance management, can ensure the long-term resistance of these plants to economically significant and aggressive diseases. The combination offers opportunities to make agriculture more sustainable ...

  • US approval for Syngenta blockbuster fungicide Solatenol

    Syngenta announced today that its breakthrough SDHI fungicide Solatenol has received registration from the US Environmental Protection Agency. First significant sales in the USA are expected in the 2016 season. Solatenol has already been launched in Latin America as ELATUS™, offering growers unrivaled performance against soybean rust, a devastating disease which can significantly impact ...


    By Syngenta

  • Launch of LALSEA BIOREM: innovative solutions for aquaculture bioremediation from microbiology expert Lallemand Animal Nutrition

    VIV Asia 2015 Tradeshow – Lallemand Animal Nutrition is pleased to announce the launch of LALSEA BIOREM, a new range of aquaculture bioremediation solutions, presented this month at VIV Asia 2015. LALSEA BIOREM is a range of synergistic combinations of specifically selected naturally occurring microorganism strains that help maintaining water quality during crop ...


    By Lallemand Animal Nutrition

  • New Publication: In Vitro Antibacterial Activity of Plant Ethanolic Extracts against Fish Pathogens

    Fifteen commercial ethanolic extracts from medicinal plants were in vitro screened for antibacterial activity against Listonella anguillarum (serotypes O1 and O2), Yersinia ruckeri,Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida, and Lactococcus garvieae. Their antimicrobial potential was assessed ...


    By World Aquaculture Society

  • Plants host pathogenic bacteria from livestock farming

    Disease-causing bacteria resulting from livestock farming can contaminate food products and find their way to humans. This occurs remarkably effectively via plants, which explains why recent outbreaks due to infection with EHEC and other E. coli and Salmonella strains are regularly attributed to the consumption of fresh vegetables. These are the findings of researchers from Wageningen UR ...

  • Crop pests ‘vastly underestimated’ warns study

    The number of different pests plaguing crops in the developing world may be vastly underestimated, contributing to severely reduced harvests in some of the world’s most important food-producing nations, say researchers. About 200 pests and pathogens per country fly under the radar of researchers and policymakers in the developing world due to a lack of technical capacity to detect them, ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Bion Announces New Canadian Patent Issued

     Bion Environmental Technologies, Inc. (OTC QB/BB: BNET) announced today that it was notified that on January 15, 2013 the Canadian Patent Office granted and issued Canadian Patent Number 2,428,417 entitled "Low Oxygen Organic Waste Bioconversion System."  This patent was applied for November 8, 2001and will remain in force until November 8, 2021. The new patent provides protection of ...

  • 2012 world food prize recipient among speakers at upcoming meetings of agronomy, crop and soil science societies

    In June, Israeli-American soil scientist Daniel Hillel was named the 2012 recipient of the World Food Prize, the foremost international honor for individuals who have advanced human development by improving the quality, quantity, or availability of food in the world. Now, Hillel—a more than 50-year member of the Soil Science Society of America (SSSA)—is slated to speak at the 2012 ...

  • Pennsylvania Budget Includes Legislation to Evaluate More Cost Effective Chesapeake Bay TMDL Solutions

     Bion Environmental Technologies, Inc. (OTC BB/QB: BNET) today announced that PA Senate Bill 1263 Section 1764F has been included in the budget recently signed by Governor Tom Corbett.  The fiscal code amendment calls for "a review of the cost, environmental, recreational and public health and safety impact and other benefits realized by the Commonwealth and Municipalities from ...

  • Bion Announces Approval of New U.S. Patent

    Bion Environmental Technologies, Inc. (OTC BB/QB: BNET) announced today that it has been notified that its U.S. Patent application 12/713,011 entitled "Method for Treating Nitrogen in Waste Streams" has been approved.  The patent application was made on February 25, 2010; upon publication and issuance, the patent will be officially granted and will remain in force until 2029.   ...

  • Bion Releases Operational Update

    Bion Environmental Technologies, Inc. (OTC BB/QB: BNET) released an operational update today. The Kreider Farms system Grand Opening was held on July 21, 2011, while the system was still in the early operational shakedown phase. Comprehensive sampling and testing began in September.  The latest round of sampling demonstrates overall nitrogen management and Chesapeake Bay verified nitrogen ...

  • Listeria Testing can Prevent Deadly Outbreaks of the Food Pathogen

    Last week the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service announced the recall of 16,000 pounds of ready-to-eat deli meat products.  The products came from a California company and were shipped to food service establishments in Arizona, California, Washington, Oregon and Nevada. Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive bacterium that some studies have suggested ...


    By EMSL Analytical, Inc.

  • Changes in wildlife migration could alter disease risk

    The risk of animals passing diseases to humans could increase in some cases, but decrease in others, as people encroach on and disrupt wildlife migration paths, according to a review in Science. Climate change is also affecting migration patterns, and the review says there is an urgent need for research on how changes in habitat and climate will affect disease in migratory animals, to predict ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Genetics not enough to increase wheat production

    The deep gene pool that has allowed wheat to achieve ever increasing gains in yield may be draining. Crop scientists estimate that 50% of the gain in wheat production over the past century has been due to breeding. According to a new study, however, that improvement has been slowing since the late 1980s, with little chance that future increases in yield can be met by breeding efforts alone. The ...

  • Turfgrass that wears down and springs back up

    Kentucky bluegrass, a turfgrass frequently grown on sports fields, is more tolerant to wear during the spring compared to other seasons, and shows better recovery during spring, according to research from Rutgers University. The study also identified which varieties of bluegrass showed the most wear tolerance. Researchers Bradley Park, T.J. Lawson, Hiranthi Samaranayake, and James A. Murphy, from ...

  • Soil gives away soybean pathogen’s presence

    New research reveals that soil pH is a useful guide for farmers and agronomists to detect and manage soybean cyst nematode, a devastating soybean pathogen. The investigation uncovered a relationship between high soil pH, which is already outside the ideal growing conditions for soybean, and high populations of cyst nematodes. Scientists from Iowa State University and University of ...

Need help finding the right suppliers? Try XPRT Sourcing. Let the XPRTs do the work for you