Plant Pathology News

  • One Topic, Multiple Requirements, Individual Solutions

    Salmonella in your cheese or chocolate, horse meat instead of beef as labelled on the packaging, toxic arsenic in rice or high mercury levels in fish - food scandals and warnings from consumer authorities regularly grab our attention. The quality and safety of food we consume directly affects us all. And food safety covers many different facets of the industry. Not only confirming that food is ...


    By Analytik Jena AG

  • Takumi SC now authorised for pumpkin protection

    Vivian Powell, Crop Protection Senior Scientist at AHDB explains why this is an important development for the speciality crops sector. “Previously, pumpkins were the only cucurbit not included under the product label for Takumi SC, or subsequent EAMUs. And with an estimated 10 million pumpkins grown in the UK every year, due partly to the growing popularity of Halloween but also as a result ...


    By Certis UK

  • Dealing with difficult powdery mildew infections on ornamental crops

    We are now at the peak of the powdery mildew season and, with increasing temperatures and dry weather conditions, susceptible crops are likely to be at high risk of infection. The pathogen There are five different powdery mildew species which attack ornamental crops in the UK. Erysiphe ssp. – this pathogen is mainly ...


    By Certis UK

  • Ambrosia beetle spreads dangerous avocado pathogen

    As the laurel wilt pathogen casts a cloud over the $100-million-a-year Florida avocado industry, University of Florida researchers continue to look for clues to prevent the pathogen from spreading. The main culprit has been the redbay ambrosia beetle, which has infected millions of native redbay and swampbay trees with the laurel wilt pathogen, but it is rarely seen in commercial avocado ...


    By University of Florida

  • Agrinos To Open State-of-the-Art Microbial Crop Input Production Facility in Oregon

    Agrinos, a leading biological crop input provider committed to improving the productivity and sustainability of agriculture worldwide, announces the construction of a new, state-of-the-art production facility in Clackamas, Oregon. The 28,000 square-foot facility near Portland, Ore., will accommodate increased production capacity for the Agrinos line of proprietary High Yield Technology® ...


    By Agrinos Inc

  • New method may help detect avocado pathogen earlier

    University of Florida researchers have found an algorithm to help them detect laurel wilt, the deadly pathogen that threatens Florida’s $100 million-a-year avocado industry. Reza Ehsani, an associate professor of agricultural and biological engineering, said the algorithm finds laurel wilt-infected avocado trees before symptoms are visible to the naked eye. About 500 growers produce ...

  • Resistance genes from wild relatives of crops offer opportunities for more sustainable agriculture worldwidew

    Growing crops with stacks of two or more resistance genes from closely related species, introduced into the crop via for instance genetic engineering, combined with the simultaneous introduction of resistance management, can ensure the long-term resistance of these plants to economically significant and aggressive diseases. The combination offers opportunities to make agriculture more sustainable ...

  • US approval for Syngenta blockbuster fungicide Solatenol

    Syngenta announced today that its breakthrough SDHI fungicide Solatenol has received registration from the US Environmental Protection Agency. First significant sales in the USA are expected in the 2016 season. Solatenol has already been launched in Latin America as ELATUS™, offering growers unrivaled performance against soybean rust, a devastating disease which can significantly impact ...


    By Syngenta

  • Mold that Provides Life Saving Penicillin can also Grow Indoors Causing Harm

    In 1928, penicillin was discovered by scientist Alexander Fleming.  Penicillin is a group of antibiotics derived from a type of mold known as Penicillium.  The antibiotics were some of the first drugs that were effective against a number of different types of bacteria that traditionally were responsible for countless deaths. This same type of mold, that has provided tremendous ...


    By Cochrane & Associates, LLC

  • Bion Announces New Canadian Patent Issued

     Bion Environmental Technologies, Inc. (OTC QB/BB: BNET) announced today that it was notified that on January 15, 2013 the Canadian Patent Office granted and issued Canadian Patent Number 2,428,417 entitled "Low Oxygen Organic Waste Bioconversion System."  This patent was applied for November 8, 2001and will remain in force until November 8, 2021. The new patent provides protection of ...

  • 2012 world food prize recipient among speakers at upcoming meetings of agronomy, crop and soil science societies

    In June, Israeli-American soil scientist Daniel Hillel was named the 2012 recipient of the World Food Prize, the foremost international honor for individuals who have advanced human development by improving the quality, quantity, or availability of food in the world. Now, Hillel—a more than 50-year member of the Soil Science Society of America (SSSA)—is slated to speak at the 2012 ...

  • Pennsylvania Budget Includes Legislation to Evaluate More Cost Effective Chesapeake Bay TMDL Solutions

     Bion Environmental Technologies, Inc. (OTC BB/QB: BNET) today announced that PA Senate Bill 1263 Section 1764F has been included in the budget recently signed by Governor Tom Corbett.  The fiscal code amendment calls for "a review of the cost, environmental, recreational and public health and safety impact and other benefits realized by the Commonwealth and Municipalities from ...

  • Bion Announces Approval of New U.S. Patent

    Bion Environmental Technologies, Inc. (OTC BB/QB: BNET) announced today that it has been notified that its U.S. Patent application 12/713,011 entitled "Method for Treating Nitrogen in Waste Streams" has been approved.  The patent application was made on February 25, 2010; upon publication and issuance, the patent will be officially granted and will remain in force until 2029.   ...

  • Changes in wildlife migration could alter disease risk

    The risk of animals passing diseases to humans could increase in some cases, but decrease in others, as people encroach on and disrupt wildlife migration paths, according to a review in Science. Climate change is also affecting migration patterns, and the review says there is an urgent need for research on how changes in habitat and climate will affect disease in migratory animals, to predict ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Genetics not enough to increase wheat production

    The deep gene pool that has allowed wheat to achieve ever increasing gains in yield may be draining. Crop scientists estimate that 50% of the gain in wheat production over the past century has been due to breeding. According to a new study, however, that improvement has been slowing since the late 1980s, with little chance that future increases in yield can be met by breeding efforts alone. The ...

  • Turfgrass that wears down and springs back up

    Kentucky bluegrass, a turfgrass frequently grown on sports fields, is more tolerant to wear during the spring compared to other seasons, and shows better recovery during spring, according to research from Rutgers University. The study also identified which varieties of bluegrass showed the most wear tolerance. Researchers Bradley Park, T.J. Lawson, Hiranthi Samaranayake, and James A. Murphy, from ...

  • Soil gives away soybean pathogen’s presence

    New research reveals that soil pH is a useful guide for farmers and agronomists to detect and manage soybean cyst nematode, a devastating soybean pathogen. The investigation uncovered a relationship between high soil pH, which is already outside the ideal growing conditions for soybean, and high populations of cyst nematodes. Scientists from Iowa State University and University of ...

  • Using rotation crops to improve soil quality

    Soil quality issues are being researched within two crop rotation experiments that started in 1994 at Narrabri. They compare several crop rotations that include or exclude legume phases. The data presented here relate to the most recent 2-year cycles of these experiments. Following cotton harvest at the end of the previous cycle, rotation crops are sown (winter cereal, faba beans (grain) or vetch ...

  • FEECO International provides solutions minimizing phosphate contaminations in water shed

    FEECO an industry leader of fertilizer, material handling, and organic waste solutions is currently working with Brown County on the Brown County Waste Transformation Initiative (BCWTI). The principle of the project is to be able to take the county’s organic waste, process it and sell it around the world as nutrient-rich, pathogen-free fertilizer. “Making fertilizer out of waste is nothing novel ...


    By FEECO International, Inc.

  • Saving wheat crops worldwide

    In a paper published in the prestigious journal Science, scientists from CSIRO Plant Industry, the University of Zurich and the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center have identified a wheat gene sequence which provides protection against leaf rust, stripe rust and powdery mildew. “Genetic disease resistance is highly desirable in plants as it is more environmentally friendly and ...

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