Beef Cattle Feeding Articles

  • Seasteading could be the answer to sustainably feeding 9 billion people

    Self-sufficient nation states in the middle of the ocean might be our ticket to a sustainable future. Oceans cover 71 percent of Earth’s surface, yet provide less than 2 percent of the food we eat. The growing demand for seafood, however — predicted to rise to 8 percent during the next decade — from an already depleted and exhausted ocean is forcing ...


    By Ensia

  • USDA Give A Little More Background On Rancho Recall

    The United States Department of Agriculture has gone to great lengths in alerting consumers to the scope of the Rancho Feeding Corporation recall of beef, which has wide scale implications throughout the US market and some shipments overseas. The USDA Food Safety Inspection Service branch clarified previous recall notifications of the Rancho issue due to the alarmingly widespread scope of the ...


    By Adamant Valves

  • Supplementation strategies effects on performance of beef heifers grazing stockpiled pastures

    The increased cost of inputs has led livestock producers in the southeastern United States to use alternative management practices to supplement beef cattle (Bos spp.) on pastures. The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of beef heifers grazing stockpiled limpograss [Hemarthria altissima (Poir.) Stapf & C.E. Hubb.] pastures supplemented with cottonseed meal (CSM, Gossypium ...

  • Ethanol Fundamentals

    What’s Ethanol? Ethanol is an alcohol-based alternative fuel produced from crops such as corn, barley, and wheat or from 'cellulosic biomass' such as trees and grasses. Brazil and the US together account for nearly 70% of global ethanol production. Virtually all US ethanol requirements today are satisfied by domestic production. Today All gasoline vehicles are capable of operating on ...


    By BSC Sustainability Services

  • Ammonia and hydrogen sulphide flux and dry deposition velocity estimates using vertical gradient method at a commercial beef cattle feedlot

    Ammonia and hydrogen sulphide flux and dry deposition velocity were estimated using micrometeorological vertical gradient flux method at a commercial cattle feedyard of approximately 50,000 head of beef cattle and average 14.4 m²/head (150 ft²/head) stocking density. Ammonia-N and H2S-S loss had general diurnal patterns with the highest fluxes in daytime and lowest fluxes in nighttime that ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

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