Cattle Grazing Articles

  • Drought and flooding rains

    Walter Jehne, former CSIRO Climate Scientist and Microbiologist, founder of Healthy Soils Australia, has written a 3-part document on drought in Australia and in it he demonstrates many scientific facts about how we should be managing our soils. There are many fascinating revelations in his scientific analysis such as how the removal of vegetation affects rainfall or how the lowering of soil ...

  • Desert Fish Farming & Waste Management

    Fish Waste Disposal In Desert Farming When you think about desert farming, desert fish farming probably isn’t an activity that springs to mind. Desert farming conjures ideas of livestock grazing across dry, arid landscapes, or rows and rows of hardy, sun-worshipping ...


    By Inciner8 Limited

  • Lambing season - Case Study

    Addfield understands that lambing is the main harvest for the hill farmer, usually generating two-thirds of annual income, so we make sure our machines are a worthy investment by assuring farmer’s that they are receiving the highest quality incineration machinery. Clients overview As a farmer, deciding when the lambing season will entirely depend on your knowledge of ...

  • Beef Farmer Spring 2017 `Trace elements are key to growth rates`

    Iodine has a direct impact on growth rates as it is incorporated into the thyroid hormones which control metabolism, promoting efficient live weight gain. Annie Williams, Animal Scientist with Agrimin says that many beef units fall short on achieving optimum growth rates because animals do not receive adequate levels of trace elements at grass. She says that with increased feed costs, many ...


    By Agrimin Limited

  • How a new way of thinking about soil sparked a national movement in agriculture

    For three weeks every month, Ray Archuleta captivates audiences with a few handfuls of soil. He begins with two clumps, dropping them into water. The soil from a farm where the soil isn’t tilled holds together, while the tilled soil immediately disperses, indicating poor soil structure. Next, volunteers from the audience — mostly farmers and ranchers — pour water over a soil ...


    By Ensia

  • Climate and Economic Benefits of Agroforestry Systems

    Introduction Agriculture is well known as a significant contributor to global greenhouse gas emissions, but emerging practices in land management have the potential to curtail these emissions and reverse much of the ecological and climate harm caused by overly intensive systems. One such practice, cultivation and conservation of trees in agricultural practices, or agroforestry, is an important ...


    By Climate Institute

  • 5 Essential Farm Implements For Smallholders

    What are your top tools or farm implements that make life as a smallholder that much easier? What’s on your Christmas wish list or gets regular use around your plot? We asked our team to share their essential implements and have created the Farm Tech Supplies Top 5 List of Farm Implements! If you have a trusted piece of farm equipment you couldn’t do without, ...


    By Farm Tech Supplies Ltd.

  • Which Compact Tractor Should I Buy?

    One of the more significant purchases a smallholder is likely to make is a compact tractor. If you’ve put off investing in one until now you may be worried about making the wrong choice and not getting the value you need out of your investment. Here we share some of the ...


    By Farm Tech Supplies Ltd.

  • Wholesale arable change leads to tight slug control

    "Eight years into implementing a zero-till policy across the farm, we’re seeing improved yields of 10 tonnes per hectare for our first year wheat, and five tonnes per hectare on winter beans. We’ve also noticed that we continue to see year-on-year improvements to soil structure and crop yields. “The winter beans have been extremely valuable in the rotation to ensure nitrogen and ...


    By Certis UK

  • A big slug year ahead?

    In addition to the weather, stubble clean-ups and green bridge carry-over are the two other major contributors, which means that high slug pellet usage on farms across the UK is likely this year, explains Justin Smith agronomist for Bartholomews Agri Food Ltd. “I work with farmers in the East Sussex and Kent areas, most of whom farm in vulnerable water catchment areas and are looking for ...


    By Certis UK

  • A four‐country ring test of nontarget effects of ivermectin residues on the function of coprophilous communities of arthropods in breaking down livestock dung

    By degrading the dung of livestock that graze on pastures, coprophilous arthropods accelerate the cycling of nutrients to maintain pasture quality. Many veterinary medicinal products, such as ivermectin, are excreted unchanged in the dung of treated livestock. These residues can be insecticidal and may reduce the function (i.e., dung‐degradation) of the coprophilous community. In the present ...


    By John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Surprising ways Kenyans are embracing climate-smart agriculture

    In rural Kenya, where it may only rain twice per year, farmers and herders are embracing so-called “climate-smart” agriculture. The video above, produced by the World Bank, begins by showing how John and Mary Obuom have transformed their one-acre farm into a model of sustainable practices. The family plants a diversity of crops in case one or more fails in a given year. A thicket of ...


    By Ensia

  • Can Latin America do palm oil right?

    As western hemisphere oil palm plantations boom, environmentalists eye ways to avoid repeating the devastation in Southeast Asia. What do soap, Ben & Jerry’s and Kit Kat bars have in common? They all contain palm oil — produced by the oil palm tree. Native to West Africa, oil palm has ...


    By Ensia

  • Searching for the best dog to save livestock — and wildlife

    Can the right breed help keep both domestic animals and native carnivores alive? This story was co-published with High Country News, a nonprofit media organization that covers the important issues and stories that define the American West. On a bright fall morning in central Washington, a flock of ...


    By Ensia

  • Sustaining Mali’s Inner Niger Delta

    The Inner Niger Delta in central Mali is a giant green oasis on the edge of the Sahara desert. It is one of the country’s most productive areas, but also among its poorest. At the height of the wet season, when the River Niger is swollen by heavy rainfall in Guinea, an area the size of Belgium, from Mopti to Tombouctou, turns into a landscape of lakes. As I discovered on a previous ...


    By Wetlands International

  • Tracking the fate of ancient carbon in the Siberian Arctic

    The Siberian Arctic is one of the most remote and pristine corners of the planet. During the brief summer season, temperatures can climb into the 90s Fahrenheit, and the seemingly endless expanse of boreal forest — or taiga — and tundra explodes with plant and animal life. Every summer since 2008, R. Max Holmes and colleagues from the Woods Hole Research Center have brought a growing ...


    By Ensia

  • Have Your Steak and Eat It, Too

    In our recent feature, “Has Meat Met Its Match?,” writer Rowan Jacobsen explores ways people can (now and possibly in the future) reduce the environmental and food security impacts of their diets, including entomophagy (bug-eating), synthetic meat and vegetarian substitutes. If none of those fits your needs, there are plenty of other ways ...


    By Ensia

  • Moving Up the Food Chain

    For most of the time that human beings have walked the earth, we lived as hunter-gatherers. The share of the human diet that came from hunting versus gathering varied with geographic location, hunting skills, and the season of the year. During the northern hemisphere winter, for instance, when there was little food to gather, people there depended heavily on hunting for survival. Our long history ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • The value of seed harboured in Mediterranean temporary ponds

    Temporary ponds and their varying water levels provide the conditions for valuable wildlife habitat. A study in Crete, conducted under the LIFE-Nature project1 Actions for the Conservation of Mediterranean Temporary Ponds in Crete, has demonstrated these ponds contain varied collections of seeds and that these ‘seed banks’ could play an important role in vegetation recovery after ...

  • Coming home to roost!

    The Pannonian biogeographical region is one of nine regions of Europe included in the EU Habitats Directive. It stretches from south of Timisoara along the Romanian West Plain to the Hungarian.Ukranian border in the east across Hungary to the border with Austria in the west including the southern edge of the Slovak Republic and the south-east corner of the Czech Republic to the north. The full ...

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