Hay Growing Articles

  • Accounting for adaptation in assessing impact of climatic variations on crop yields: an empirical study of Arizona

    The goal of this paper is to analyze the impacts of climatic variation around current normals on crop yields and explore corresponding adaptation effects in Arizona, using a unique panel data. The empirical results suggest that both fertilizer use and irrigation are important adaptations to climate change in crop production. Fertilizer use has a positive impact on crop yields as expected. When ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • Effects of changes in climatic variables on maize crop water requirements in Huang–Huai–Hai watersheds, China

    The study of crop water requirements (CWR) under climate change is critical for reasonable crop irrigation. In the present study, the effects of changes in climatic variables from 1961 to 2010 on maize CWR in Huang–Huai–Hai (HHH) watersheds in China were investigated. Five daily climatic factors including maximum temperature (Tmax), minimum temperature ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • Rake In Greater Capacity And Higher Hay Quality

    It’s been said that the steel-toothed dump rake was first introduced in the 1860s. Of course, the process back then was to rake hay into piles, which were then pitched onto a wagon for transport to a haystack or the barn loft. To make windrows for the balers that came later, the operator simply spaced the “dumps” equally so they lined up in the field. The irony is that until ...


    By Vermeer

  • Comparison of runoff quantity and quality under annual cropping and forages

    Conversion from annual cropping to perennial forages may be a beneficial management practice (BMP) to reduce runoff quantity and improve surface water quality. Runoff variables were determined in two 30 ha producer's fields over 4 years (2004–2007) using a rainfall simulator. Field 1 was cropped to barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) in 2004 and then an alfalfa (Medicago sp.) and grass mix used for ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • Las Vegas DirtWorkz, Inc.: Using the City’s wood waste to farm the desert

    Ray Becerra knows a thing or two about recycling, reusing and repurposing waste materials. You might even say it’s in his blood. Becerra has spent his entire life around landfills and farming operations, and he wears his passion for recycling waste materials on his sleeve. His enthusiasm for dust, dirt and debris, says Becerra, comes from his father, an avid recycler who was involved in the ...

  • Intake and digestibility of improved selections of tall fescue and orchardgrass hays

    Improved cool-season grass cultivars may add production potential to ruminant enterprises across the North–South transition zone. Quality among hays of ‘MaxQ’ (‘Jesup’ with novel endophyte), HM4 (‘HiMag’ with novel endophyte No. 4) and ‘Cajun’ (without endophyte) tall fescues [Lolium arundinaceum (Schreb.) Darbysh.] and ‘Persist’ orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.) was evaluated. Forage was ...

  • Ergot alkaloid concentrations in tall fescue hay during production and storage

    Common tall fescue [Lolium arundinaceum (Schreb.) Darbysh. = Schedonorus arundinaceus (Schreb.) Dumort.] is infected with a fungus that produces ergot alkaloids, a class of compounds associated with fescue toxicosis. The objective of this research was to monitor the change in concentrations of ergot alkaloids from time of clipping through storage of tall fescue hay. A 2-yr field study was ...

  • Intake and digestibility of ‘Coastal’ bermudagrass hay from treated swine waste using subsurface drip irrigation

    Waste handling systems for confined swine production in the upper South (approximately 32–37° N and 79–93° W) depend mainly on anaerobic lagoons and application of the waste effluent to cropland. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the quality of ‘Coastal’ bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.] hay receiving effluent generated from a raw swine waste treatment system designed to ...

  • Long-term agronomic performance of organic and conventional field crops in the mid-atlantic region

    Despite increasing interest in organic grain crop production, there is inadequate information regarding the performance of organically-produced grain crops in the United States, especially in Coastal Plain soils of the mid-Atlantic region. We report on corn (Zea mays L.), soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.], and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) yields at the USDA-ARS Beltsville Farming Systems Project ...

  • An economic analysis of alfalfa harvest methods when infested with verticillium wilt

    Verticillium wilt is a disease that negatively affects alfalfa fields throughout the northern United States. This disease is caused by the fungus Verticillium albo-atrum that, once introduced into alfalfa fields, spreads rapidly, becomes difficult to control, and causes substantial plant yield loss. This disease can be extremely costly for alfalfa hay producers, especially for producers where ...

  • One Year Later · Persistent Herbicides in Compost

    ONE YEAR has passed since the Washington State University (WSU) composting facility and the Spokane Regional Compost Facility discovered traces of persistent herbicides in their composts. In Spokane, the source of contamination is a compound called clopyralid. Compost contamination at WSU initially involved the herbicide picloram, but clopyralid has since been detected in the compost also. In ...


  • Latest Developments in Mid-to-Large-Scale Vermicomposting

    Latest Developments in Mid-to-Large-Scale Vermicomposting This overview of systems and operational projects describes factors which contribute to their success as well as the challenges that have forced sites to close. Many different approaches are being used to process large volumes of organic residuals with earthworms, ranging from relatively simple land and labor-intensive ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Implementing Research : Georgia Takes Many Routes to Recycle Food Residuals

     PETROLEUM HYDROCARBON LEVELS “One unique local characteristic (and treatment difficulty) we encountered in our composting program,” says Stan Konno, PWC environmental department director head, “is the high level of diesel range total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content in the sludge from the WWTF at Fort Kamehameha.” Oil from past leaks in pipelines and tanks — which go back to 1941 — ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Certified Organic Farm Relies on Compost

    Located 50 miles northwest of Dayton, Ohio, the owners of Fresh Aire Farms grow crops on over 250 acres of farmland, relying on high quality compost as a soil conditioner and nutrient amendment. Dan and Michelle Young started composting seven years ago to reduce the amount of chemical inputs they had to buy. “We are a certified organic farm incorporating sound cropping principles,” says Dan ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Composting Food Residuals on the Farm

    A county agency and a farmer in Vermont have teamed up to collect and compost food residuals and other organics. The Rutland County Solid Waste District (RCSWD), which is responsible for managing MSW for 16 cities and towns, began planning the food residuals composting program in December, 1996 with the Rutland Natural Resource Conservation District, one of 14 districts in Vermont that promotes ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

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