agricultural grab News

  • Land “Grabbing” Grows as Agricultural Resources Dwindle

    Since 2000, more than 36 million hectares—- an area about the size of Japan—- has been purchased or leased by foreign entities, mostly for agricultural use. Today, nearly 15 million hectares more is under negotiation (www.worldwatch.org). “Farmland is lost or degraded on every continent, while ‘land grabbing’—- the purchase or ...


    By Worldwatch Institute

  • Land “Grabbing” Grows as Agricultural Resources Dwindle

    Since 2000, more than 36 million hectares—an area about the size of Japan—has been purchased or leased by foreign entities, mostly for agricultural use. Today, nearly 15 million hectares more is under negotiation (www.worldwatch.org). “Farmland is lost or degraded on every continent, while ‘land grabbing’—the purchase or lease of ...


    By Worldwatch Institute

  • Agricultural land grabs threaten local property rights and sustainable development

    With large-scale agricultural investments on the rise, the rights of local people must be protected. Large-scale land acquisitions for agricultural use by both local and foreign commercial entities – often dubbed “land grabs” - are on the rise worldwide. Often touted as a form of economic development, these ...

  • “Land Grabs” in Agriculture: Fairer deals needed to ensure opportunity for locals

    The trend of international land grabbing—when governments and private firms invest in or purchase large tracts of land in other countries for the purpose of agricultural production and export—can have serious environmental and social consequences, according to researchers at the Worldwatch Institute. Deals that focus solely on financial profit can leave rural populations more ...


    By Worldwatch Institute

  • Despite drop from 2009 peak, agricultural land grabs still remain above pre-2005 levels

    An estimated 70.2 million hectares of agricultural land worldwide have been sold or leased to private and public investors since 2000, according to new research conducted by the Worldwatch Institute (www.worldwatch.org) for its Vital Signs Online service. The bulk of these acquisitions, which are called “land grabs” by some observers, took place between 2008 ...


    By Worldwatch Institute

  • Water grabbing occurring at `alarming rates`

    Deals in which rich foreign corporations and countries buy or lease agricultural land abroad result in nearly half a trillion cubic metres of fresh water also being grabbed each year — often enough to grow sufficient food to abate undernourishment in the 'grabbed countries', a paper reveals. The majority of land grabbing takes place in Africa and Asia, and the amount of grabbed water per ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • OPINION: Corporate land grabs threaten food security

    Proponents of the local food movement like to talk about keeping "food miles" to a minimum. Buying a New Zealand apple in New England is a big no-no. Imagine if instead of stores buying fruit from the South Pacific, the government was buying land in South America to produce "our own" food. Yet that is what's happening all over the world, ...


    By Worldwatch Institute

  • On horizon 2050 - billions needed for agriculture

    Net investments of $83 billion a year must be made in agriculture in developing countries if there is to be enough food to feed 9.1 billion people in 2050, according to an FAO discussion paper published today.  Agricultural investment thus needs to increase by about 50 percent, according to the paper prepared for the High Level Experts’ Forum on How to Feed the World in 2050, Rome 12-13 ...

  • Headline Grabbing Peanut Butter Recall Involves Fewer than 3,000 Jars

    Last week The Washington Post published a report on the peanut butter recall that has made national headlines this month.  According to the article, fewer than 3,000 jars of the peanut butter that may have been contaminated made it to store shelves.  The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) is monitoring the situation for possible cases of illness from the peanut butter, but so far none ...


    By EMSL Analytical, Inc.

  • MARVIN™ technology saves agriculture & horticulture time and money

    Four hundred thousand seedlings, nearly half of what a plant grower of, say, young tomato plants, produces in one season; this is the amount that sorting machines with the MARVIN technology can process in a single day. They rapidly make 3D models of the plants and accurately evaluate their size and features in milliseconds. “The information can be automatically recorded in a database and ...

  • Investments in women farmers still too low

    Women farmers produce more than half of all food worldwide and currently account for 43 percent of the global agricultural labor force, yet few extension or research services are directed at women farmers,according to new research conducted by the Worldwatch Institute (www.worldwatch.org) for its Vital Signs Online service. Women produce as much as 50 percent of the ...


    By Worldwatch Institute

  • Fertiliser can offset heat for African farmers

    [NAIROBI] African smallholders in dry areas can overcome climate change and even double crop yields if they invest in fertiliser use and harvest rainwater, researchers have found. Farmers in arid and semi-arid areas usually protect themselves from climate-related losses by investing as little as possible in farm inputs such as fertilisers. But in doing so they fail to grab opportunities for ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Leading the fight for food sovereignty, an interview with La Via Campesina’s Dena Hoff

    Dena Hoff is a farmer and activist in eastern Montana, where she has raised sheep, cattle, alfalfa, and corn with her husband since 1979. Hoff is the North America coordinator for La Via Campesina-the "international movement of peasants"-as well as vice president of the National Family Farm Coalition and former chair of the ...


    By Worldwatch Institute

  • Focus on Gender: The dangers of digitising land data

    At its 2014 Land and Poverty Conference in March, the World Bank highlighted the efficacy of producing computerised land-related data using satellites, drones, databases and other sources such as traditional surveys. This makes it easier and quicker to register land and generate title deeds, and ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Eat locally processed food to support health, communities

    Let's face it. We Americans love processed foods. With no major chain grocery stores within the city limits and even smaller markets closing their doors, most Detroiters either head to the closest suburban Kroger, Meijer or Aldi or get by on slim convenience store pickings. But in all these stores you can count how many aisles of shelves filled with bags, boxes, jars and cans of food with ...


    By Worldwatch Institute

  • Large South African presence at Agritech Expo in April indicates strong interest in Zambia’s agri sector

    “Zambia is an exciting market to explore, not just for South African suppliers to the agriculture sector, but also for South African farmers” says Liam Beckett, commercial director for the upcoming Agritech Expo Zambia. The award-winning event is owned by the Zambia National Farmers Union (ZNFU) and returns to Chisamba for the fourth time this year from ...

  • New Manure Sidedress Method Lowers Fertilizer Costs, Increases Yields

    With corn needing nitrogen, and pigs and cattle producing a lot of it, anything that offers a better way to use their waste to fortify crops should intrigue farmers. Two agriculture experts at The Ohio State University have redesigned a metal tractor attachment so that it allows farmers to put manure on a field while crops are ...


    By Ohio State University

  • Four N113 HiTech 5 Tractors in Council Work

    Like most British cities and towns, Derby includes a lot of open spaces – everything from acres of parkland, playing fields and golf courses to grass verges and central reservations. All of this land requires maintenance, such as grass cutting and replanting, tree cutting and the removal of cut timber, and repairs to the infrastructure, including roadways, walls and ornamental bridges. To ...

  • African nations agree to put a price on nature

    Ten African nations have pledged, ahead of Rio+20, to include the economic value of natural resources in their national accounts. Africa has taken the lead in the quest to persuade nations to include the full economic value of their natural resources in their national accounts, with the promise last month by ten of its nations to do so. The heads of state or government of ...


    By SciDev.Net

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