agricultural pest survey News

  • Coffee pest spreading to other crops in East Africa

    East Africa's horticulture could face a severe crisis due to 'species jump' — whereby a disease moves from a known host to new and unusual ones — affecting fruits, vegetables, and medicinal and ornamental plants. Researchers in Uganda have discovered that the Black Coffee Twig Borer, a devastating coffee pest, has crossed over from Robusta coffee to about 40 plant  ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Bats can help protect rice farms against pests

    Bats that prey on a major rice pest in Thailand could save paddy harvests worth millions of dollars and help contribute to better food security, scientists say in a paper published in Biological Conservation in March. Using data from a previous study and their own field survey, the scientists came up with a value of the predation of the ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • New Jersey Declares Itself Free From Devastating Tree-Killing Pest

     Federal and state agriculture officials today delivered some welcome news for New Jersey residents in the state's long running battle against the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB). "After more than a decade, we can declare ...

  • Agriculture Gives Unmanned Aerial Vehicles a New Purpose

    Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), sometimes referred to as “drones,” have found a use beyond the military. According to Rory Paul, founder and CEO of Volt Aerial Robotics, a UAV company, the sky’s the limit for what these devices offer farmers. “UAVs will be very useful, efficient and economical in scouting crops for diseases and other pests and also for surveying crop ...


    By United Soybean Board (USB)

  • OECD Releases Guidance and Surveys Regarding Minor Use Pesticide Registration Incentives

    The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) recently released three documents on pesticide minor uses: (1) Guidance Document on Regulatory Incentives for the Registration of Pesticide Minor Uses (Minor Use Guidance); (2) OECD Survey on Regulatory Incentives for the Registration of Pesticide Minor Uses: Survey Results; and (3) OECD Survey on Efficacy & Crop Safety Data ...


    By Bergeson & Campbell, P.C.

  • OECD releases guidance and surveys regarding minor use pesticide registration incentives

    The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) recently released three documents on pesticide minor uses: (1) Guidance Document on Regulatory Incentives for the Registration of Pesticide Minor Uses (Minor Use Guidance); (2) OECD Survey on Regulatory Incentives for the Registration of Pesticide Minor Uses: Survey Results; and (3) OECD Survey on Efficacy & Crop Safety Data ...


    By Acta Group

  • Agriculture Secretary Announces $3 Million for a New Program to Improve Pollinator Health

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) will provide close to $3 million in technical and financial assistance for interested farmers and ranchers to help improve the health of bees, which play an important role in crop production. The funding is a focused investment to improve pollinator health and will be targeted in five Midwestern states, ...

  • Ontario Releases Draft Pollinator Protection Health Action Plan

    On January 22, 2016, Ontario released for consultation a draft Health Action Plan (Plan) to reduce losses of honeybees and other pollinators caused by several “stressors” stated in the Plan to include: (1) reduced habitat and poor nutrition; (2) diseases, pests, and genetics; (3) exposure to ...


    By Bergeson & Campbell, P.C.

  • Unmanned drones could play key roles in food supply

    Herding cattle. Counting fish. Taking an animal's temperature. Applying pesticides. When it comes to drones, "your imagination can go pretty wild in terms of what would be possible," says Roger Johnson, president of the National Farmers Union. This month, the Federal Aviation Administration issued the first permit for agricultural use of unmanned aerial vehicles. Steven Edgar, president and CEO ...


    By Associated Press

  • Spurred by warming climate - beetles threaten coffee crops

    The highlands of southwestern Ethiopia should be ideal for growing coffee. After all, this is the region where coffee first originated hundreds of years ago. But although coffee remains Ethiopia's number one export, the nation's coffee farmers have been struggling. The Arabica coffee grown in Ethiopia and Latin America is an especially climate-sensitive crop. It requires just the right amount of ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

  • Manhattan And Staten Island, N.Y. Declared Free Of The Asian Longhorned Beetle

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) today announced that the New York City boroughs of Manhattan and Staten Island are free from the invasive Asian longhorned beetle (ALB). USDA remains focused on carrying out its mission, despite a ...

  • Pesticide Finder - Your advisor on pesticide management

    Pesticide Finder - Your advisor on pesticide management" has been selectioned by FINODEX (Future INternet Open Data EXpansion) a programm co-funded by the European Union to support SMEs and Web Entrepreneurs to develop products, services  using Open Data ...


    By Geospatiumlab, S.L.

  • UF/IFAS researcher to growers: Peaches can be profitable in three years

    Florida peach growers, some of whom are looking for an alternative to citrus as greening takes a toll on that crop, could see a small profit by their third year of operation, a UF researcher says. Greening, a disease first found in Florida in 2005, has led to $4 billion in lost revenue and industry-related jobs since 2006 for the $9 billion-a-year citrus industry. As some farmers turn to peaches, ...

  • Bt cowpea could generate up to US$1 billion for small farmers

    A pest-resistant version of the black-eyed pea, a subspecies of the cowpea, is on track for commercial introduction, promising higher yields and claimed savings of up to US$1 billion of a crop that has found new popularity among African smallholders. The cowpea, actually a bean, is rich in protein and is an important crop for both tackling malnutrition and adapting to climate change as it ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Scientists claim GM cowpea could generate US$1 billion

    A pest-resistant version of the black-eyed pea, a subspecies of the cowpea, is on track for commercial introduction, promising higher yields and claimed savings of up to US$1 billion on a crop that has found new popularity among African smallholders. The cowpea, actually a bean, is rich in protein and is an important crop for both tackling malnutrition and adapting to climate change as it ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Pakistan needs a new crop forecasting system

    Pakistan's outdated crop yield forecasting system needs a revamp, says Ibrar ul Hassan Akhtar. Like most developing countries, Pakistan is staring at the spectre of food insecurity, with its food production out of sync with population growth. The food availability scenario is further ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Herbicide reduction can preserve crop yields as well as biodiversity benefits of weeds

    Pesticide-sparing approaches to farming do not have to compromise on crop yields, new research suggests. A study that explored the impact of reduced herbicide use across a variety of different farming contexts found that herbicideefficient systems could be just as productive as conventional systems — and more so than organic systems — whilst having other important environmental ...

  • Modern rice information system helps DA plan and respond to disasters

    Reliable information based on satellite data and ground observations can help the Philippines prepare for and mitigate the effect of recurring disasters, such as typhoons and El Niño, on rice areas in Mindanao.  Since 2014, the Philippine Rice Information System (PRISM) has been providing the Department ...

  • Pesticides may harm wild bees but natural areas can mitigate effects

    The use of pesticides in orchards may be threatening populations of wild bees, which are important pollinators that increase crop productivity, a new study concludes. However, the damage was mitigated in areas where the orchards were surrounded by natural landscapes, such as deciduous forests. Pollinators, such as bees, provide an important and often underappreciated ecosystem service to ...

  • Ambrosia beetle spreads dangerous avocado pathogen

    As the laurel wilt pathogen casts a cloud over the $100-million-a-year Florida avocado industry, University of Florida researchers continue to look for clues to prevent the pathogen from spreading. The main culprit has been the redbay ambrosia beetle, which has infected millions of native redbay and swampbay trees with the laurel wilt pathogen, but it is rarely seen in commercial avocado ...


    By University of Florida

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