agriculture bird control News

  • New hope for migratory grassland birds of South America

    The rich grasslands in South America, home to one of the world's most valuable ecosystems is fast disappearing and migratory grassland birds, which play an important role by dispersing seeds and controlling insects, are also rapidly declining in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Paraguay and Uruguay. In order to reverse this trend, the Convention on Migratory Species of the United Nations Environment ...

  • Plastic mulching reduces farmland bird numbers and diversity

    Using plastic sheeting to encourage early growth of crops reduces the number and diversity of farmland birds, new research from Poland suggests. The study shows that this effect continues even after plastic has been removed. Plastic ‘mulching’ is the use of sheets of plastic to cover vegetables after sowing; this controls weeds and increases the soil temperature, allowing faster ...

  • Plastic mulching reduces farmland bird numbers and diversity

    Using plastic sheeting to encourage early growth of crops reduces the number and diversity of farmland birds, new research from Poland suggests. The study shows that this effect continues even after plastic has been removed. Plastic ‘mulching’ is the use of sheets of plastic to cover vegetables after sowing; this controls weeds and increases the soil temperature, allowing faster ...

  • USDA: Bird flu vaccine works on chickens; testing on turkeys

    Scientists have developed a vaccine strain that has tested 100 percent effective in protecting chickens from bird flu and testing is underway to see if it also protects turkeys, U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack told the House Agriculture Committee at a hearing on Wednesday. If it does, the agency plans to quickly license it for widespread production and is seeking funding from the Office of ...


    By Associated Press

  • 1st restocked Iowa turkey farmer talks lessons from bird flu

    Thousands of small young turkeys ran around the barns on the Moline family farm Monday near Manson, the first Iowa farm to restock birds after a bird flu outbreak decimated flocks in the Midwest. Owner Brad Moline, who farms with his father and brother, said it's a sign the industry is turning the page on an outbreak in which about 48 million birds died from the virus or where euthanized to ...


    By Associated Press

  • Controlled ‘reset’ for nematode-infested soil

    Harmful nematodes that damage the soil can be controlled by creating an environment in which they are temporarily deprived of oxygen. Covering the soil with plastic film or a layer of water encourages anaerobic bacteria to produce fatty acids, which will kill most nematodes. “It does sometimes take a while,” says Leendert Molendijk, soil expert at Wageningen UR. Molendijk and his ...

  • New avian influenza’s rapid spread to Europe threatens poultry sector especially in low-resourced countries

    A new bird flu strain detected in Europe which is similar to strains reported to be circulating in 2014 in Asia poses a significant threat to the poultry sector, especially in low-resourced countries situated along the Black Sea and East Atlantic migratory routes of wild birds, FAO and the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) warned today. Germany, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom ...

  • Ohio Poultry Owners Advised to Increase Biosecurity as Virus Spreads in Western U.S.

    Three worrisome strains of avian flu have been detected in birds out West. These viruses can cause serious disease in birds, and their appearance has prompted poultry veterinarians at The Ohio State University to recommend that Ohio’s commercial producers and backyard chicken enthusiasts alike take precautions to protect their flocks. The strains are related to a virus ...


    By Ohio State University

  • CFAES Experts Available to Speak on Avian Flu

    Experts from The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and the College of Veterinary Medicine are available to speak with the media about the avian influenza virus. A federal report released on May 11 determined agency challenges in preventing the virus in both poultry and humans. Change-Won (Charles) Lee, an Ohio Agricultural Research and Development ...


    By Ohio State University

  • Marrone Bio Innovations Receives EPA Approval for Broad-spectrum Bioherbicide

     Marrone Bio Innovations, Inc. (MBI), a leading global provider of natural pest management products for the agricultural and water treatment markets, announced today that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has approved MBI-005, a unique broad-spectrum selective bioherbicide for potential use on a variety of crops, turf and ...

  • Arsenic in field runoff linked to poultry litter

    Fields amended with poultry litter can accumulate significant levels of arsenic, according to studies by USDA-Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists and associates. These findings provide key information about the agricultural pollutants that can build up in agricultural soils over time—and possibly migrate into nearby streams and rivers. Poultry producers have sometimes ...

  • Silage harvesting partly responsible for decline in skylarks

    Farmland birds like skylarks are attracted to nest in agricultural grassland, but repeated harvesting for silage causes most nests to fail. This study showed that skylark breeding success in silage was too low to sustain local populations. The researchers say that grass silage is a hostile environment for breeding skylarks and conservation efforts should focus on making other parts of the ...

  • First Bayer ForwardFarm launched in Belgium

    Bayer CropScience has inaugurated the first Bayer ForwardFarm in the Belgian town of Huldenberg. The “Hof ten Bosch” farm owned by Jan and Josse Peeters brings together farmers, scientists and academia, technology partners and other players throughout the value chain, politics and regulators, as well as consumers, with the goals of exchanging agricultural know-how and forming ...


    By Bayer CropScience AG

  • Laser beams and robots to feature in veggie grower seminar

    Laser beams, robots and mid-air vegetable cultivation will be on the agenda for over 100 of the country’s leading vegetable growers at the 2015 Global Technologies in Horticulture Seminar to be held on Thursday 25 June at Jupiters Gold Coast. The Seminar aims to educate Australian growers on the futuristic technology they can employ on-farm, and builds on a highly successful series of ...


    By AUSVEG

  • Prevention crucial to new European animal health plans

    Animals in Europe - from wild and farmyard animals to domestic pets - could soon come under the remit of a proposed EU-wide animal health strategy. The aim is to put the onus on prevention rather than cure. Bird flu, BSE and foot and mouth disease have shown the danger that outbreaks of animal disease can pose to animals, the wider economy and to humans themselves. A parliamentary report on ...


    By European Parliament

  • Warning from European Academies of Science about implications of neonicotinoid use

    A joint report to the European Commission from the Academies of Science in the EU Member States concludes that there is rapidly increasing scientific evidence that neonicotinoids have a significant negative impact on the natural environment. Some of the organisms affected fulfil important functions in agricultural areas, for example, the wild pollinators and the predatory insects which can play ...

  • EPA Approval of IoMax for feedwater expands Biolargo`s robust solutions for poultry industry

    BioLargo, through its commercial partner Clarion Water, obtained EPA registration for the use of aqueous iodine in poultry applications. This registration for poultry marks a key milestone in the commercialization of a full suite of biosecurity solutions aimed at mitigating the risk of avian flu and other common pathogens such as E. ...


    By Biolargo, Inc.

  • Forest conservation could reduce malaria transmission

    Preserving the biodiversity of tropical forests could have the added benefit of cutting the spread of malaria, according to a new study. The finding contradicts the traditional view that clearing native forest for agriculture curbs malaria transmission in the Amazon rainforest. "Our study suggests, in contrast, that ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Grassy field margins enhance soil biodiversity

    Grass strips at field margins are almost as valuable as hedgerows in encouraging diversity of soil creatures, according to new research. Six metre wide margin strips increase the number and variety of species such as earthworms, woodlice and beetles, and may act as corridors between isolated habitats. The study analysed the presence of invertebrates of three main feeding types - soil ingesters ...

  • Bat Numbers in Europe Surge after Decades of Decline, Major Study Finds

    Following decades of worrying decline, Europe's bat population increased by 43 per cent between 1993 and 2011, according to a new study released by the European Environment Agency (EEA). The upsurge in population has been aided by legislation and treaties that promote conservation measures, including the UNEP-administered Agreement on the Conservation of Populations of European Bats (EUROBATS), ...

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