agriculture crop News

  • Diversifying crops `could green African agriculture`

    The biodiversity of crop fields could be key to a greener revolution in Africa, where ecosystems are degrading and crop yields are stagnating, says a study conducted in Malawi. African farmers could halve their fertiliser use and still get the same yields, the study found, with less year-to-year variation in yields and with as much as 70 per cent more protein in grains — by simply rotating ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Maximising the yield of agricultural crop residues and biomass from forestry

    There is a huge potential for yield increase of agricultural crop residues and biomass from forestry in the European Union, Ukraine, Russia and Belarus. In a study for the European Commission, Ecofys has investigated the realistic and technical-sustainable potential for these regions. The research team developed and assessed best practice strategies for residue yield increase with regard to their ...


    By Ecofys

  • Agricultural ammonia emissions could be reduced without affecting crop yield

    Ammonia released by nitrogen fertilisers in Spanish agriculture could be reduced by up to 82% with only a very minimal impact on crop yield, finds new research. This could be achieved by combining optimised management of manure with the use of non-urea synthetic fertilisers. Agriculture accounted for almost 94% of total European atmospheric emissions of ammonia in 2011. The main sources of these ...

  • Crop Protection 2014 Update available through Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development

    One of the most widely requested publications available through Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development is the Crop Protection book, also known as the “Blue Book.” This publication is updated annually and provides the most recent information on registered pesticide products. Updates for the pesticide products included in the ...

  • Cultivating crops on city rooftops

    To meet the challenges of producing food in a more environmentally-friendly way, the European Environment Agency (EEA) has called on cities to develop 'living walls' of edible plants. Through vertical farming, agriculture could become a feature of urban life, lowering energy consumption, carbon emissions and resource use in food production. By shortening the distance produce has to travel from ...


    By GLOBE Foundation

  • The future of cover crops

    Winter cover crops are an important component of nutrient cycling, soil cover and organic matter content. Although its benefits are well documented, cover crop use in farming systems is relatively low. Research has shown that time and money are the two primary reasons why farmers are hesitant to adopt the technique. Developing innovative and cost-effective crop cover systems could increase the ...

  • Chipper and baler for energy crops

    Biothek, a company devoted to biomass research and production from Arundo k-12, and the chipping machine manufacturer Serrat from Aragon in Spain, have presented a chipping head that can be coupled to a baler for energy crops The chipping head replaces the traditional system for feeding balers or pick-up by attaining more compact, denser bales. In the first demonstration carried out on Arundo ...

  • Cereal Crops Feeling the Heat

    LIVERMORE, California (ENS) - Warming temperatures since 1981 have caused annual losses of about US$5 billion for six major cereal crops, new research has found. This is the first study to estimate how much global food production already has been affected by climate change. From 1981 to 2002, fields of wheat, corn and barley throughout the world have produced a combined 40 million ...

  • Crop water use efficiency

    Crop water use efficiency (WUE), or yield per unit of water used, can be improved through irrigation management and methods, including deficit irrigation (irrigating less than is required for maximum yields) and supplemental irrigation (irrigating to supplement precipitation so as to avoid crop failure or severe yield decline). Thus, WUE is key for agricultural production with limited water ...

  • Growing crops in the city

    A case study published in the 2010 Journal of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Education by professors at Washington State University studies the challenges one organization faced in maintaining an urban market garden. The journal is published by the American Society of Agronomy. Since 1995, Seattle Youth Garden Works (SYGW) has employed young homeless individuals or those involved in the ...

  • Saltwater solution to save crops

    Technology under development at the University of New South Wales could offer new hope to farmers in drought-affected and marginal areas by enabling crops to grow using salty groundwater. Associate Professor Greg Leslie, a chemical engineer at UNSW's UNESCO Centre for Membrane Science and Technology, is working with the University of Sydney on technology which uses reverse-osmosis membranes to ...

  • Patents fail to boost crop yields

    Policies that secure intellectual property rights (IPRs) for agricultural innovations often fail to encourage technology transfer to developing countries or increase crop yields, a study shows. “Intellectual property rights are ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Soil and crop management and carbon sequestration

    Research results from management scenarios ranging from those in the South Eastern, Great Plains, and Upper Midwest regions of the US and from Italy are reported in the March-April, 2010 issue of the Soil Science Society America Journal. This group of papers originated from the Soil Carbon Sequestration and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Symposium that was held jointly by the Soil Science Society of ...

  • BiOWiSH™-Crop receives Organic Certification

    July 13, 2011  For Immediate Release CHICAGO, IL - The Washington State Department of Agriculture (WSDA) has issued a certification approving BiOWiSH™-Crop as an organic material. The certification allows organic farmers throughout the United States to use BiOWiSH-Crop™ as a fertilizer and soil amendment on all crop types. ...


    By BiOWiSH Technologies

  • Overcoming obstacles to GM crop adoption

    This policy brief, published by the UK's Parliamentary Office of Science and Technology (POST), examines the potential benefits and challenges of using genetically modified (GM) crops for agricultural development in the developing world, and highlights ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Yield projections for Switchgrass as a Biofuel Crop

    While scientists have conducted numerous studies on production of biomass from biofuel crops, such as switchgrass, no one has yet compiled this information to evaluate the response of biomass yield to soils, climate, and crop management across the United States. A team of researchers from Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Dartmouth College published just such a study in the July-August 2010 ...

  • Helping farmers export `forgotten` crops

    In a global first, over 300 crop safety and pesticide management officials and other experts are meeting this week at FAO to discuss challenges associated with pesticide use on 'speciality crops' like garlic, ginger and chilies. The event starts today and runs through December 7. Unlike large-area crops such as corn, wheat, cotton or rice, specialty crops have traditionally been produced in ...

  • Soil phosphorus in an organic cropping system

    Phosphorus is a nonrenewable resource, raising concerns that agricultural practices may deplete reserves. (For one overview discussion of phosphorus, see Phosphorus Famine: The Threat to Our Food Supply in the June 2009 Scientific American.) Organic farming with low phosphorus  inputs can result in deficient levels of plant-available phosphorus (available-P).A group of researchers from ...


    By American Society of Agronomy

  • Assessing stressed crops from the sky

    In Peru, the International Potato Center (CIP), Lima, uses drones to aerially assess crop performance under different stresses, such as pests, diseases, drought and frost — all of them widespread phenomena in the Andes, one ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Insect diversity improves crop pollination

    The decline in numbers of wild bees has caused concern regarding falling levels of pollination for important agricultural crops. Researchers have now demonstrated that the diversity of the pollinator community can significantly affect pollination. Insect pollination is a vital ecosystem service; a large proportion of the human diet either directly or indirectly depends on animal-based ...

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