agriculture pathogen News

  • Ambrosia beetle spreads dangerous avocado pathogen

    As the laurel wilt pathogen casts a cloud over the $100-million-a-year Florida avocado industry, University of Florida researchers continue to look for clues to prevent the pathogen from spreading. The main culprit has been the redbay ambrosia beetle, which has infected millions of native redbay and swampbay trees with the laurel wilt pathogen, but it is rarely seen in commercial avocado ...


    By University of Florida

  • New method may help detect avocado pathogen earlier

    University of Florida researchers have found an algorithm to help them detect laurel wilt, the deadly pathogen that threatens Florida’s $100 million-a-year avocado industry. Reza Ehsani, an associate professor of agricultural and biological engineering, said the algorithm finds laurel wilt-infected avocado trees before symptoms are visible to the naked eye. About 500 growers produce ...

  • EPA Issues Guidance for Antimicrobial Pesticide Products to Combat Emerging Viral Pathogens

    On September 2, 2016, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued guidance to registrants on the process for making claims against emerging viral pathogens not on EPA-registered disinfectant labels (Guidance). A draft of this guidance was issued in April 2016 and ...


    By Bergeson & Campbell, P.C.

  • Listeria Testing can Prevent Deadly Outbreaks of the Food Pathogen

    Last week the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service announced the recall of 16,000 pounds of ready-to-eat deli meat products.  The products came from a California company and were shipped to food service establishments in Arizona, California, Washington, Oregon and Nevada. Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive bacterium that some studies have suggested ...


    By EMSL Analytical, Inc.

  • Agricultural research needs a global rethink

    The Global Conference on Agricultural Research for Development must reset research priorities, says World Food Prize winner Monty Jones. The world's agricultural scientists have done life-saving work in university laboratories, global research centres and government agencies. Millions of people across the developing world are alive today because of advances that have conquered deadly pathogens, ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Agriculture Secretary Announces $3 Million for a New Program to Improve Pollinator Health

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) will provide close to $3 million in technical and financial assistance for interested farmers and ranchers to help improve the health of bees, which play an important role in crop production. The funding is a focused investment to improve pollinator health and will be targeted in five Midwestern states, ...

  • Resistance genes from wild relatives of crops offer opportunities for more sustainable agriculture worldwidew

    Growing crops with stacks of two or more resistance genes from closely related species, introduced into the crop via for instance genetic engineering, combined with the simultaneous introduction of resistance management, can ensure the long-term resistance of these plants to economically significant and aggressive diseases. The combination offers opportunities to make agriculture more sustainable ...

  • Blue Sphere Announces US Agricultural and Dairy Farm Waste to Energy and High Value Soil Amendment Production Initiative

      Blue Sphere Corp. (OTCBB: BLSP) (the "Company" or "Blue Sphere"), a company in the Cleantech sector as an emission reduction and renewable energy project integrator, is pleased to announce that it has embarked on a campaign to implement dairy farm waste to energy and high-value soil amendment production projects across the United States. These projects will ...


    By Blue Sphere Corporation

  • AgBiome Launches New Business Unit Focused on Delivering Innovations to Agriculture and Turf and Ornamental Markets

    AgBiome, LLC, today announced it has established AgBiome Innovations™, which will commercialize technology identified by the company through its unique Genesis™ discovery and development platform. The division is led by a highly experienced team of agricultural and turf and ornamental industry leaders and is gearing up to launch its first product, a broad-spectrum biological ...


    By AgBiome, Inc.

  • UF/IFAS Finding Could Help Farmers Stop Potato, Tomato Disease

    A University of Florida scientist has pinpointed Mexico as the origin of the pathogen that caused the 1840s Irish Potato Famine, a finding that may help researchers solve the $6 billion-a-year disease that continues to evolve and torment potato and tomato growers around the world. A disease called “late blight” killed most of Ireland’s potatoes, while today it costs Florida ...

  • Southern soils mitigate manure microbes

    That swine manure sprayed on to fields adds valuable nutrients to the soil is well known. But what is not known is whether all that manure is bringing harmful bacteria with it. A new study looks at the levels of nutrients and bacteria in soils of fields that have been sprayed with manure for fifteen years or more. The research team, composed of scientists from the USDA-ARS Crop Science Research ...

  • Crop pests ‘vastly underestimated’ warns study

    The number of different pests plaguing crops in the developing world may be vastly underestimated, contributing to severely reduced harvests in some of the world’s most important food-producing nations, say researchers. About 200 pests and pathogens per country fly under the radar of researchers and policymakers in the developing world due to a lack of technical capacity to detect them, ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Deadly Bacteria Causes Food Recall

    Last month it was reported that a Northern California company voluntarily recalled a number of products that had been distributed across the Western United States.  Random tests by agricultural officials of broccoli showed a positive test for Listeria monocytogenes, which then prompted the recall. Listeria monocytogenes is a type of bacteria that is one of the most virulent ...


    By EMSL Analytical, Inc.

  • Livestock surge may harm human health

    Livestock intensification in developing countries, especially in Africa and Asia, may increase the incidence of epidemics that kill both humans and animals, the Vision 2020: Leveraging Agriculture for Improving Nutrition and Health conference, was told today. Livestock numbers are rising sharply due to both population growth — small-scale farmers depend on livestock for their livelihoods ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • USDA Proposes New Food Safety Requirements

    This week the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) proposed a new requirement for the meat and poultry industry that would potentially decrease the amount of contaminated foods that reach the public.  According to a news release from the USDA, “…USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) would be able to hold products from commerce until FSIS test results for harmful ...


    By EMSL Analytical, Inc.

  • Bion Responds to Food Safety Issues

    Bion Environmental Technologies, Inc. (OTC: BNET).  Food safety concerns have been in the news again with the recent account of an outbreak of deadly E. coli in Germany, initially identified as coming from bean sprouts.  In the Sunday June 12th edition of the NY Times, an article by Elizabeth Rosenthal titled ...

  • Changes in wildlife migration could alter disease risk

    The risk of animals passing diseases to humans could increase in some cases, but decrease in others, as people encroach on and disrupt wildlife migration paths, according to a review in Science. Climate change is also affecting migration patterns, and the review says there is an urgent need for research on how changes in habitat and climate will affect disease in migratory animals, to predict ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • ARS plant collections help safeguard crops

    In the months ahead, Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists plan to collect walnuts from Kyrgyzstan, grasses from Russia, and carrots and sunflowers from fields across the Southeastern United States in efforts that will enhance one of the nation's most effective tools for protecting the food supply. Researchers will make the trips to collect plants with useful ...

  • UF/IFAS finds way to reduce E. coli in cows, improving food safety

    A new biological treatment could help dairy cattle stave off uterine diseases and eventually may help improve food safety for humans, a University of Florida study shows. Kwang Cheol Jeong, an assistant professor in animal sciences and UF’s Emerging Pathogens Institute, examined cattle uterine illnesses because they can make cows infertile, lower milk production and because those maladies ...

  • New test can detect plant viruses faster, cheaper

    A new test could save time and money diagnosing plant viruses, some of which can destroy millions of dollars in crops each year in Florida, says a University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences researcher. In a newly published study, Jane Polston, a UF/IFAS plant pathology professor, examined several ways to detect the DNA genome of begomoviruses. These viruses have emerged ...

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