agriculture runoff News

  • Tillage and reduced-input rotations affect runoff from agricultural fields

    A new study from researchers at the USDA Agricultural Research Service provides information about runoff under different management practices and can help farmers choose the practice that is best for them. No-till management practices can reduce soil erosion, but evidence suggests they can also lead to increased runoff of dissolved phosphorus from soil surfaces. Meanwhile, farmers looking ...

  • Manure runoff depends on soil texture

    Research has documented the rise of nutrient runoff from flat agricultural fields with high rates of precipitation that adds nitrates and phosphates to waterways. These nutrients increase the amount of phytoplankton in the water, which depletes oxygen and kills fish and other aquatic creatures. While injecting animal manure slurry into the soil has been proven to be an effective way of reducing ...

  • Tracking phosphorus runoff from livestock manure

    Nutrient runoff from livestock manure is a common source of agricultural pollution. Looking for an uncommon solution, a team of scientists has developed an application of rare earth elements to control and track runoff phosphorus from soils receiving livestock manure. In addition to reducing the solubility of phosphorus, this method shows particular promise for researchers interested in tracking ...

  • Cover crops reduce erosion, runoff

    Cover crops may be more effective at reducing soil erosion and runoff after maize harvest than rough tillage, according to scientists from the Université Catholique de Louvain, in collaboration with the Independent Center for the Promotion of Forage (CIPF). The three-year study, supervised by Charles Bielders and conducted by Eric Laloy, measured erosion and runoff losses from silt loam ...

  • Promising solution to runoff issues ahead

    At Thanksgiving, many Americans look forward to eating roast turkey, pumpkin pie, and tangy red cranberries. To feed that appetite, cranberry farming is big business. In Massachusetts, cranberries are the most valuable food crop. The commonwealth’s growers provide one-fourth of the U.S. cranberry supply. Water plays a big role in cranberry farming. At harvest time, cranberry growers ...


    By American Society of Agronomy

  • Arsenic in field runoff linked to poultry litter

    Fields amended with poultry litter can accumulate significant levels of arsenic, according to studies by USDA-Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists and associates. These findings provide key information about the agricultural pollutants that can build up in agricultural soils over time—and possibly migrate into nearby streams and rivers. Poultry producers have sometimes ...

  • Fine-tuned policies needed to limit phosphorus runoff

    New research in Ireland has evaluated two policies designed to reduce phosphorus runoff from agricultural land into water. Data indicate that policies need to be better tailored to specific times and locations, in order to deal with, for example, the impact of seasonal changes and different soil types on phosphorus runoff. Intensive agriculture and high populations tend to transfer ...

  • Compost filter socks improve runoff from Croplands

    Water runoff from cropped farm fields can contain large amounts of eroded soil as well as some of the fertilizer and herbicide. Expanding on existing conservation practices, a team of scientists has tested whether compost filters socks in grassed waterways would reduce sediment flow and retain dissolved chemicals in runoff. The researchers observed reduced sediment in a non-tilled field and ...

  • Agriculture Compost and Water Quality Intersections

    A more defined connection between compost, soil health, and water quality is vital for inclusion in predictive watershed modeling and consequently, nutrient management plans. ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Exploring the use of wastewater in agriculture

    With food demand and water scarcity on the uptick, it's time to stop treating wastewater like garbage and instead manage it as a resource that can be used to grow crops and help address water scarcity in agriculture. ...

  • A new tool to assess nitrogen and phosphorus flow in agriculture

    MITERRA-EUROPE is a new tool that models the amount of nitrogen and phosphorus, among other key pollutants, used in agriculture across all 27 Member States at regional, country and EU-27 levels. It can be used to calculate the effects of different strategies to minimise excess pollution.  Many regions in the EU-27 use more nitrogen and phosphorus in agriculture than is required. The main sources ...

  • Forthcoming world resources report will focus on food security and sustainable agriculture

    Today is World Food Day, a chance for people all over the world to focus on approaches to end global hunger. Celebrated each year to commemorate the founding of the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), this day provides us with an opportunity to assess where the world ...

  • Water and Agriculture Leaders Plant Seeds for Environmental Progress in Rare Collaboration

    he US Water Alliance issued a report today highlighting common ground and innovative strategies between agriculture and water and wastewater utilities to reduce nutrient pollution in the Mississippi River Basin. “Coming Together to Protect  Mississippi River Watersheds:  Agriculture and Water Sector Collaboration for Nutrient Progress” (August ...


    By U.S. Water Alliance

  • World Soil Day hails symbiotic role of pulses to boost sustainable agriculture

    Soil and pulses can make major contributions to the challenge of feeding the world's growing population and combating climate change, especially when deployed together, according to Soils and Pulses: Symbiosis for Life, a new report by the UN Food and Agriculture Organization released on  ...

  • National Association Of Clean Water Agencies (NACWA) commends EWG report on agricultural nutrient run-off

    NACWA commends the Environmental Working Group for its report “Troubled Waters: Farm Pollution Threatens Drinking Water”  and for shining the spotlight on the critical public health issues raised by agricultural sources of nutrient pollution.  Nutrient pollution in U.S. surface and ground waters is becoming the ...

  • Herbicide-tolerant crops can improve water quality

    The residual herbicides commonly used in the production of corn and soybean are frequently detected in rivers, streams, and reservoirs at concentrations that exceed drinking water standards in areas where these crops are extensively grown. When these bodies of water are used as sources of drinking water this contamination can lead to increased treatment costs or a need to seek alternative sources ...

  • Ohio offers $150M in no-interest water plant loans

    Ohio's environmental regulators laid out a plan Thursday to assist cities with testing and treating their drinking water, a first step in the state's response to last week's water emergency in Toledo that left 400,000 people without clean tap water. The state will make $150 million in interest-free loans available so that cities can upgrade water treatment and wastewater plants. Some of that ...


    By Associated Press

  • Grass strips help curb erosion, herbicide transport

    Grass filter strips placed in riparian zones not only curb soil erosion, but can help block and degrade the widely used herbicide atrazine, Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists report. Atrazine has been used extensively to suppress weeds in corn production for decades, but because it's applied directly to soil it's especially prone to losses in surface runoff. The contamination of ...

  • USDA seeks partnerships to protect soil and water

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is teaming with businesses, nonprofits and others on a five-year, $2.4 billion program that will fund locally designed cosnervation of soil and water projects nationwide, Secretary Tom Vilsack said Tuesday. Authorized by the new farm law enacted earlier this year, the Regional Conservation Partnership Program is intended to involve the private sector more ...


    By Associated Press

  • American society of agronomy

    Recycling manure is an important practice, especially for large livestock producers. Manure can be used as fertilizer to aid in crop production, aiding livestock producers that grow their own feed crops. While manure does provide a rich nutrient source for crops, it also can contribute to nutrient leaching and runoff. This can contaminate the surrounding ecosystem and lead to eutrophication of ...

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