animal disease News

  • Containing animal disease outbreaks: agriculture MEPs endorse deal with Council

    Measures to prevent and halt outbreaks of animal diseases such as avian flu or African swine fever, informally agreed by MEPs and the Council in June 2015, were backed by the Agriculture Committee on Tuesday. The draft EU law, on diseases that are transmissible among animals and potentially to humans too, will put more emphasis on prevention and help keep pace with scientific progress. ...


    By European Parliament

  • Surge in diseases of animal origin necessitates new approach to health - report

    Population growth, agricultural expansion, and the rise of globe-spanning food supply chains have dramatically altered how diseases emerge, jump species boundaries, and spread, according to an FAO report released today. A new, more holistic approach to managing disease threats at the animal-human-environment interface is needed, it argues. Seventy percent of the new diseases that have emerged in ...

  • The Dangers of Mad Cow Disease!

    For the first time in over ten years Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) better known as Mad Cow Disease has reared its head again in the UK with cases recorded on a farm in Aberdeenshire, Scotland this October. ...

  • The Catastrophic Cost of Foot and Mouth Disease

    Foot and Mouth disease has never completely disappeared. Although it has been almost 20 years since the last major outbreak of Foot and Mouth disease in the UK, which cost the industry more than £8 Billion, it does not mean that the disease is not still a very real risk to the economy. This August the first outbreak since 2001 in the UK was identified at an abattoir in Brentwood in Essex. ...

  • World experts to tackle infectious disease threats

    The concept of ‘One Health’ is a global strategy for expanding interdisciplinary collaborations and communications in all aspects of health care for animals, humans and the environment. The Chair of the Congress’ organising committee, Director of CSIRO’s Australian Animal Health Laboratory Dr Martyn Jeggo, said the three-day conference provides a forum where the ...

  • Predicting disease and improving crops through genetics

    Can scientists accurately predict when an individual will develop a disease? What if we could predict how to increase drought resistance in plants? Or offer patients personalized medicine? Researchers are looking for answers to these questions and more using a plant or animal’s obvious traits, called phenotype prediction, a field that will be discussed in a free workshop presented by the ...

  • Crunching genomes to boost animal health

    FAO has chosen the SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics as a designated reference centre to expand its access to state-of the-art technology in combating dangerous viral infections, including avian influenza and foot-and-mouth disease, in farm animals and wildlife. The SIB is equipped with high performance computers, ...

  • Targeting total eradication of a devastating livestock disease

    The world can definitively stamp out a plague that devastates sheep and goats, freeing hundreds of millions of rural families from one of the major risks to their food security and livelihood. FAO and the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) will outline a strategy for the total eradication of Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) by 2030 at a an international conference starting today in ...

  • Oyster imports bring alien ‘hitchhikers’ and disease

    The future of oyster farming in Europe is threatened by disease. However, a recent study highlights the risk of importing oysters to improve or replace lost stock, as this could accidentally bring further disease and invasive species. The Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas), originally from East Asia, has been the main species of oyster farmed in Europe since the early 20th century. Populations ...

  • Changes in wildlife migration could alter disease risk

    The risk of animals passing diseases to humans could increase in some cases, but decrease in others, as people encroach on and disrupt wildlife migration paths, according to a review in Science. Climate change is also affecting migration patterns, and the review says there is an urgent need for research on how changes in habitat and climate will affect disease in migratory animals, to predict ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Study finds gene clues to African cattle disease

    Scientists studying the tsetse fly-borne disease "sleeping sickness" and a devastating version found in cattle say they have found two genes that may in future help rescue the livelihoods of millions of farmers in Africa. In a study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) journal on Monday, the researchers said the genes should help cattle breeders identify animals that can ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Mapping wildlife diseases may help prevent their spread

    Tracking wildlife disease outbreaks around the world is now possible with another online map that shows where threats to the health of wild animals, domestic animals, and people are occurring. The Global Wildlife Disease News Map, developed jointly by the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the U.S. Geological Survey, USGS, was introduced publicly this week.  Updated daily, the map ...

  • Launching of the Sciences & Animals Paris Saclay Institute

    What types of animal selection should be used in farming in the coming years? How will the environment impact the phenotypes of animals and the expression of their genomes? How should new strategies for health be defined? Can appropriate and relevant models for prediction be developed? How are the biological systems of livestock and animal models for human health related? On February 12 2015, ...

  • Prevention crucial to new European animal health plans

    Animals in Europe - from wild and farmyard animals to domestic pets - could soon come under the remit of a proposed EU-wide animal health strategy. The aim is to put the onus on prevention rather than cure. Bird flu, BSE and foot and mouth disease have shown the danger that outbreaks of animal disease can pose to animals, the wider economy and to humans themselves. A parliamentary report on ...


    By European Parliament

  • Vaccination of farmed fish good for animals and thus for humans

    More than half of the fish consumed worldwide is cultivated in ponds or tanks. And the percentage of cultivated fish in relation to wild fish is increasing. The scale on which fish are currently farmed makes it necessary to protect them, by means of vaccination, against disease and premature death. An understanding of the immune system in fish will hopefully lead to effective vaccination methods ...

  • NIH study finds two pesticides associated with Parkinson`s disease

    New research shows a link between use of two pesticides, rotenone and paraquat, and Parkinson's disease. People who used either pesticide developed Parkinson's disease approximately 2.5 times more often than non-users. The study was a collaborative effort conducted by researchers at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), which is part of the National Institutes of ...

  • Internet of Things – Improving Animal Welfare and Reducing Use of Water

    It’s been a buzz word for some time now; the internet of things (IoT), which sees the adoption of technologies including sensor-controlled rooms for growing lettuces, cows connected to the internet to improve milk, and even bees receiving a boost from automated heaters. A report by Beecham Research, as detailed in The Guardian, examines how the use of IoT has real potential to cut costs and ...


    By ENDURAMAXX Storage Tanks

  • Pew Commission calls for better US animal waste treatment

    One step beyond her front door, Jayne Clampitt is greeted with the toxic fumes flowing from the roughly 1 million gallons of hog manure stored at her neighbor's farm. She no longer dries her family's laundry outside, her children avoid the nearby polluted stream, and she worries that their shallow drinking well will also be contaminated with toxins. 'We thought there was this unspoken connection ...

  • USDA Creates Multi-Agency Emergency Response Framework to Combat Devastating Citrus Disease

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture today announced the creation of a new, unified emergency response framework to address Huanglongbing (HLB), a serious disease of citrus that affects several U.S. states and territories. This new framework will allow USDA and its many partners to better coordinate HLB resources, share information and develop operational strategies to maximize effectiveness. "USDA ...

  • Rising number of farm animals poses environmental and public health risks

    The global population of farm animals increased 23 percent between 1980 and 2010, from 3.5 billion to 4.3 billion, according to research by the Worldwatch Institute for its Vital Signs Online publication. These figures continue a trend of rising farm animal populations, with harmful effects on the environment, public health, and global development. Both production and consumption of animal ...


    By Worldwatch Institute

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