chemical soil research News

  • Parkinson’s researchers focus on chemical from soil bacteria

    A chemical produced by common soil bacteria may kill neurons that produce dopamine, according to a study publishing Oct. 6. Dopamine neuron demise leads to the hallmark symptoms of Parkinson’s disease, a movement disorder affecting some 1 million Americans. The National Institutes of Health-sponsored research, publishing in the online open-access journal PLoS One, is preliminary, according to ...


    By ScienceDaily

  • Research to restore the fertility of earth`s soils

    In keynote addresses at the FAO Workshop on Sustainable Agriculture in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia on April 28 and April 29, 2009, soil fertility experts from the Nutrition Security Institute, (NSI) a non-profit organization located in Bellevue, Washington, presented advances and understandings in biotic soil fertility as a proven solution to the serious problems facing global agriculture. Their dual ...

  • Household compost as good for soil as conventional fertilisers, say EU researchers

    Since 2005, conventional disposal of organic waste has been prohibited in Sweden. Instead, this waste is incinerated or separated at source, processed (composted or anaerobically digested) and recycled as fertiliser on crop land. A new study has investigated the use of organic waste from different sources as a fertiliser and found that residue from biogas production is an effective fertiliser. ...

  • Effects of chemical fertiliser and animal manure on soil health compared

    Fertilising crops with cattle manure can lead to better soil quality than when synthetic fertiliser is used, recent research indicates. The use of cattle manure in the study led to greater soil fertility by encouraging higher microbial activity, and the researchers suggest that it could potentially improve soil’s ability to cope with periods of difficult growing conditions. The ...

  • Rediscovering sound soil management

    At the same time that demand for food is soaring along with the world’s population, the soil’s ability to sustain and enhance agricultural productivity is becoming increasingly diminished and unreliable. Fortunately, it’s not too late to restore our soil resources. What it will take, say the editors and contributors to a new book, Soil Management: Building a Stable Base for ...

  • Writing an equation for soil success

    Soil isn’t one size fits all. It may look the same under your feet – but under a microscope, that’s a different story. A plant’s roots, tiny bugs – these things can tell one soil from another quite easily. Soil scientists typically measure different aspects of soil — how much air it contains, how well it retains water, heat, and more — to ...


    By American Society of Agronomy

  • Research and Markets: North and Latin American Crop Protection Chemicals Market by Types, by Crop Types, by Geography: Trends and Forecast to 2018

    Research and Markets (http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/vk62fr/north_and_latin) has announced the addition of the "North and Latin American Crop Protection Chemicals Market by Types (Herbicides, Fungicides, Insecticides, ...


    By Research and Markets

  • Controlled ‘reset’ for nematode-infested soil

    Harmful nematodes that damage the soil can be controlled by creating an environment in which they are temporarily deprived of oxygen. Covering the soil with plastic film or a layer of water encourages anaerobic bacteria to produce fatty acids, which will kill most nematodes. “It does sometimes take a while,” says Leendert Molendijk, soil expert at Wageningen UR. Molendijk and his ...

  • Cultivation affects pesticide–soil interactions

    Pesticides are often used to enhance crop production by killing unwanted animals or plants. Unfortunately, they can also negatively impact humans and environmental health. The degree of impact, in part, depends on the fate and behavior of pesticides in the environment. The latter is governed by complex interactions of pesticides with soil components. One such important interaction is sorption of ...

  • `We need a new approach for better soil`

    ‘Dutch agricultural soils are not future-proof’ was a widely accepted statement at the final meeting of the Public Private Partnership (PPP) Sustainable Soil. Breeders, chain partners, suppliers, the government and the science sector see a gradual deterioration in soil quality and are joining forces within the PPP to find a solution. “It isn’t a simple matter,” says ...

  • A model to measure soil health in the era of bioenergy

    One of the biggest threats to today’s farmlands is the loss of soil organic carbon (SOC) and soil organic matter (SOM) from poor land-management practices. The presence of these materials is essential as they do everything from providing plants with proper nutrients to filtering harmful chemical compounds to the prevention of soil erosion. Sustainable management practices for crop residues are ...

  • Target the crop not the soil - to reduce fertiliser use

    Feed the crop not the soil’ is the message of a new review into sustainable phosphorus use. Currently, phosphorus fertiliser is applied to the soil, and plants then take it up through the roots. However, more precise nutrient management is needed on farms, the researchers say, so that the phosphorus is targeted at the crop just as it needs it. Modern agriculture is dependent on phosphorus, ...

  • Quality Organic Fertilizers & Soil Amendments at an Affordable Price

    Our health starts with our soil. If the soil in our farms and gardens is depleted of life because of chemical and fertilization, the food will be sterile and not healthy. They key to a healthy body, soul, and mind is organically grown food that is full of life. “When the things we put into our bodies are healthy, our bodies are able to utilize the nutrients with very little energy. This ...


    By Vermitechnology Unlimited

  • Using rotation crops to improve soil quality

    Soil quality issues are being researched within two crop rotation experiments that started in 1994 at Narrabri. They compare several crop rotations that include or exclude legume phases. The data presented here relate to the most recent 2-year cycles of these experiments. Following cotton harvest at the end of the previous cycle, rotation crops are sown (winter cereal, faba beans (grain) or vetch ...

  • Phosphorus-rich soils support larger invertebrates

    In a recent study, researchers have defined the relationship between soil conditions and nutrients with the health of soil ecosystems. The results suggest that organic grassland, rich in phosphorus, is supportive of large populations of bigger invertebrates. All living things are made up of chemical elements in certain proportions and the availability of these elements in the environment can ...

  • Soil biodiversity: functions, threats and tools for policy makers

    Human societies rely on the vast diversity of benefits provided by nature, such as food, fibres, construction materials, clean water, clean air and climate regulation. All the elements required for these ecosystem services depend on soil, and soil biodiversity is the driving force behind their regulation. With 2010 being the International Year of Biodiversity and with ...


    By European Commission

  • Fewer indicators may be sufficient to assess soil quality

    Although soil quality is best assessed using a wide range of indicators, a smaller set may be more practical and still provide the necessary information needed to choose between land management systems. This is the conclusion of a new study in Brazil that evaluated three different indexes of soil quality based on three sets of indicators. In order to ensure farming is sustainable, there is a ...

  • Fungi and roundworms as non-chemical substitutes for pesticides

    The use of some pesticides is a recognised concern for health and the environment. A new UK study identifies some naturally occurring alternatives to control wireworm, a widespread pest of potatoes. The wireworm causes major problems in arable crops, including potatoes, in many parts of the world. Wireworms are the larvae of click beetles. Their damage to potatoes can drastically reduce yield. ...

  • Eucalyptus essential oil as an alternative to chemical pesticides

    Controlling pests with natural products can have greater environmental benefits than using chemical pesticides. A recent study reviews the use of eucalyptus essential oil as a natural pesticide and offers recommendations for its future application. Chemical pesticides have played a major role in securing food supplies the world over. However, excessive use has led to increased environmental ...

  • Soil science society of America announces 2010 award recipients

    The Soil Science Society of America (SSSA) will present the following 2010 Awards during their Annual Meetings on Oct. 31-Nov. 3 in Long Beach, CA, www.acsmeetings.org. Kirk Scheckel – Marion L. and Chrystie M. Jackson Soil Science Award. Kirk Scheckel is a research soil scientist in the National Risk Management Research Laboratory of ...

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