chemical soil research News

  • Parkinson’s researchers focus on chemical from soil bacteria

    A chemical produced by common soil bacteria may kill neurons that produce dopamine, according to a study publishing Oct. 6. Dopamine neuron demise leads to the hallmark symptoms of Parkinson’s disease, a movement disorder affecting some 1 million Americans. The National Institutes of Health-sponsored research, publishing in the online open-access journal PLoS One, is preliminary, according to ...


    By ScienceDaily

  • Research to restore the fertility of earth`s soils

    In keynote addresses at the FAO Workshop on Sustainable Agriculture in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia on April 28 and April 29, 2009, soil fertility experts from the Nutrition Security Institute, (NSI) a non-profit organization located in Bellevue, Washington, presented advances and understandings in biotic soil fertility as a proven solution to the serious problems facing global agriculture. Their dual ...

  • Mineral content of soils key to physical and chemical behavior

    Many aspects of the physical and chemical behavior of soils are directly related to the minerals present. “This includes shrink-swell behavior, soil structure, availability of nutrients, and the fate of contaminants that enter the soil,” according to Judith Turk, University of Nebraska-Lincoln. The “Soil Mineralogy” symposium at the Managing Global Resources for ...

  • Effects of chemical fertiliser and animal manure on soil health compared

    Fertilising crops with cattle manure can lead to better soil quality than when synthetic fertiliser is used, recent research indicates. The use of cattle manure in the study led to greater soil fertility by encouraging higher microbial activity, and the researchers suggest that it could potentially improve soil’s ability to cope with periods of difficult growing conditions. The ...

  • Household compost as good for soil as conventional fertilisers, say EU researchers

    Since 2005, conventional disposal of organic waste has been prohibited in Sweden. Instead, this waste is incinerated or separated at source, processed (composted or anaerobically digested) and recycled as fertiliser on crop land. A new study has investigated the use of organic waste from different sources as a fertiliser and found that residue from biogas production is an effective fertiliser. ...

  • Writing an equation for soil success

    Soil isn’t one size fits all. It may look the same under your feet – but under a microscope, that’s a different story. A plant’s roots, tiny bugs – these things can tell one soil from another quite easily. Soil scientists typically measure different aspects of soil — how much air it contains, how well it retains water, heat, and more — to ...


    By American Society of Agronomy

  • Rediscovering sound soil management

    At the same time that demand for food is soaring along with the world’s population, the soil’s ability to sustain and enhance agricultural productivity is becoming increasingly diminished and unreliable. Fortunately, it’s not too late to restore our soil resources. What it will take, say the editors and contributors to a new book, Soil Management: Building a Stable Base for ...

  • Research and Markets: North and Latin American Crop Protection Chemicals Market by Types, by Crop Types, by Geography: Trends and Forecast to 2018

    Research and Markets (http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/vk62fr/north_and_latin) has announced the addition of the "North and Latin American Crop Protection Chemicals Market by Types (Herbicides, Fungicides, Insecticides, ...


  • Cultivation affects pesticide–soil interactions

    Pesticides are often used to enhance crop production by killing unwanted animals or plants. Unfortunately, they can also negatively impact humans and environmental health. The degree of impact, in part, depends on the fate and behavior of pesticides in the environment. The latter is governed by complex interactions of pesticides with soil components. One such important interaction is sorption of ...

  • Controlled ‘reset’ for nematode-infested soil

    Harmful nematodes that damage the soil can be controlled by creating an environment in which they are temporarily deprived of oxygen. Covering the soil with plastic film or a layer of water encourages anaerobic bacteria to produce fatty acids, which will kill most nematodes. “It does sometimes take a while,” says Leendert Molendijk, soil expert at Wageningen UR. Molendijk and his ...

  • Phosphorus-rich soils support larger invertebrates

    In a recent study, researchers have defined the relationship between soil conditions and nutrients with the health of soil ecosystems. The results suggest that organic grassland, rich in phosphorus, is supportive of large populations of bigger invertebrates. All living things are made up of chemical elements in certain proportions and the availability of these elements in the environment can ...

  • Quality Organic Fertilizers & Soil Amendments at an Affordable Price

    Our health starts with our soil. If the soil in our farms and gardens is depleted of life because of chemical and fertilization, the food will be sterile and not healthy. They key to a healthy body, soul, and mind is organically grown food that is full of life. “When the things we put into our bodies are healthy, our bodies are able to utilize the nutrients with very little energy. This ...


    By Vermitechnology Unlimited

  • Using rotation crops to improve soil quality

    Soil quality issues are being researched within two crop rotation experiments that started in 1994 at Narrabri. They compare several crop rotations that include or exclude legume phases. The data presented here relate to the most recent 2-year cycles of these experiments. Following cotton harvest at the end of the previous cycle, rotation crops are sown (winter cereal, faba beans (grain) or vetch ...

  • Polluted urban soil damages lime trees

    The impact of polluted urban soil on trees is highlighted in a recent study from Latvia. The researchers found that high salt levels from de-icing chemicals and nutrient imbalance in soil damaged lime trees growing in the city of Riga. Trees planted in cities are an important part of the urban landscape, providing a range of benefits, from enhancing biodiversity to promoting a feeling of ...

  • `We need a new approach for better soil`

    ‘Dutch agricultural soils are not future-proof’ was a widely accepted statement at the final meeting of the Public Private Partnership (PPP) Sustainable Soil. Breeders, chain partners, suppliers, the government and the science sector see a gradual deterioration in soil quality and are joining forces within the PPP to find a solution. “It isn’t a simple matter,” says ...

  • Fewer indicators may be sufficient to assess soil quality

    Although soil quality is best assessed using a wide range of indicators, a smaller set may be more practical and still provide the necessary information needed to choose between land management systems. This is the conclusion of a new study in Brazil that evaluated three different indexes of soil quality based on three sets of indicators. In order to ensure farming is sustainable, there is a ...

  • A model to measure soil health in the era of bioenergy

    One of the biggest threats to today’s farmlands is the loss of soil organic carbon (SOC) and soil organic matter (SOM) from poor land-management practices. The presence of these materials is essential as they do everything from providing plants with proper nutrients to filtering harmful chemical compounds to the prevention of soil erosion. Sustainable management practices for crop residues are ...

  • Method developed to measure solute movement in soils

    Scientists from Aarhus University and Aalborg University in Denmark have developed a new method for measuring the movement of solutes in intact soil. Improving on the existing method, the new procedure can be used on intact, undisturbed soil and provides more confident estimates. Movement, or diffusion, of solutes in soils is involved in many processes of agronomical, environmental and technical ...

  • Target the crop not the soil - to reduce fertiliser use

    Feed the crop not the soil’ is the message of a new review into sustainable phosphorus use. Currently, phosphorus fertiliser is applied to the soil, and plants then take it up through the roots. However, more precise nutrient management is needed on farms, the researchers say, so that the phosphorus is targeted at the crop just as it needs it. Modern agriculture is dependent on phosphorus, ...

  • Soil Association demands clarity on `organic` cosmetics ingredients

    A UK food and farming charity is calling on personal care manufacturers to clearly indicate if products labelled 'natural' or 'organic' contain potentially harmful chemicals. While there is no EU legislation for the use of the terms in relation to health and beauty products, independent certifications are in place. The Soil Association ...


    By Chemical Watch Research Ltd

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