climate change crop News

  • Crops and Weeds: Global climate change`s first responders

    A team of Agricultural Research Service (ARS) plant physiologists is studying how global climate change could affect food crop production--and prompt the evolution of even more resilient weeds. Lewis Ziska, Richard Sicher and Jim Bunce all work at the ARS Crops Systems and Global Change Laboratory in Beltsville, Md. Over the past several years, the three scientists have conducted research on a ...

  • Traditional food crops provide community resilience in face of climate change

    A recent study by researchers from Cornell and Rhodes universities and the Sebakwe Black Rhino Conservation Trust found that traditional food crops, such ...


    By Worldwatch Institute

  • Climate change and agriculture: food and farming in a changing climate

    Climate change is already affecting the Earth’s temperature, precipitation, and hydrological cycles, with detrimental impacts on U.S. and global agricultural systems. The interaction of these dynamic factors can lead to a decrease in plant productivity, increasing the price for many important agricultural crops. On Wednesday, June 16, 2010, between 10:30-11:30am, in Room 328A of the Senate ...

  • Fighting climate change with grasslands

    Grasslands have vast untapped potential to mitigate climate change by absorbing and storing CO2, according to a new report by FAO. Pastures and rangelands represent a carbon sink that could be greater than forests if properly managed. Covering some 30 percent of the earth’s ice-free land surface and accounting for 70 percent of its agricultural land, the world’s 3.4 billion ha of grasslands can ...

  • Nepal`s shifting rains and changing crops

    With weather becoming more erratic every year as a result of climate change, Nepali farmers are progressively shifting their approach, turning vast areas of rice paddies into small-scale vegetable farming. Vegetables are more resilient as they can be ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Climate change in Ontario

    Climate-related impacts on water resources, energy, agriculture and natural ecosystems could have profound implications for human health and for the economy of Ontario. Questions remain about whether enough is being done to put in place adaptation measures to blunt some of the worst and unavoidable impacts of climate change in Canada’s most populace province. This fourth article ...


    By GLOBE Foundation

  • Bhutan faces crop losses from erratic climate

    Agricultural experts in the Himalayan country of Bhutan — a least developed country — are concerned at increasing crop losses in recent years, attributable to global warming. The losses, which began around 2004, are the direct result of increasing pest attacks and disease, erratic rainfall, windstorms, droughts, flash floods and landslides, officials said. The country’s ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Warming climate may devastate major US crops

    Three of the most important crops produced in the United States—corn, soybeans and cotton—are predicted to suffer declines of as much as 80 percent if temperatures continue to rise with manmade climate change, says a new study. In recent years, experts have debated whether human-induced global warming will cause crops to suffer or flourish, depending on the region and the crop. The new study, ...

  • GM crops can thrive as climate warms

    Genetically engineering photosynthesis in plants could take advantage of rising global temperatures and increased levels of carbon dioxide, US scientists say. They believe this could achieve much higher yields on the same amount of land and help to stave off the prospect of widespread hunger as human populations increase. Researchers at ...


    By Climate News Network

  • Cement develops an appetite for C02

    Three new studies illuminate the sheer complexity of the aspect of climate science known as the carbon cycle − how carbon dioxide gets into the atmosphere and out again. Sometimes, human agency is at work, but nature takes care of it anyway – as one of the studies reveals in the case of cement, the world’s most widely-used building material. Zhu Liu, postdoctoral scholar at ...


    By Climate News Network

  • Writing an equation for soil success

    Soil isn’t one size fits all. It may look the same under your feet – but under a microscope, that’s a different story. A plant’s roots, tiny bugs – these things can tell one soil from another quite easily. Soil scientists typically measure different aspects of soil — how much air it contains, how well it retains water, heat, and more — to ...


    By American Society of Agronomy

  • The `hidden hunger` caused by climate change

    Understanding how carbon dioxide impacts food quality is vital to tackle malnutrition effectively, says agricultural researcher Lewis Ziska. Researchers are focusing much attention on how to adapt agriculture to ensure steady food supplies in the face of climate change. But it is equally important to preserve the quality of these supplies as well as the quantity. Researchers, policymakers and ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Creating a climate for policy change in Malawi

    A conflict between climate adaptation and food security policies shows we must create the right conditions for change, says Blessings Chinsinga. The adverse effects of climate change on the livelihoods of the rural poor can no longer be ignored. They are threatening to cause tremendous damage to ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Norway invests $23.7 million in crop diversity to help farmers face climate change

    The government of Norway has pledged $23.7 million to conserve and sustainably manage the world's most important food crops, citing the critical need for crop diversity at a time when populations are soaring and climate change is threatening staples like rice and maize. "In just ten years we will have a billion more people at the global dinner table, but during that same time we could see climate ...

  • Population has bigger effect than climate change on crop yields, study suggests

    Population pressure will be as significant a factor as climate change in reducing crop yields — and thus increasing food insecurity — in West Africa, according to a modelling study. The authors inserted different ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Building resilience to climate change in Niger

    Climate change poses a major threat to the world’s 2 billion rural poor, but sustainable natural resource management can help developing countries like Niger adapt to the threat. Droughts and desertification associated with climate change will hit Africa hard. Already, more than 300 million (out of 930 million) Africans live in drought or drought-prone areas. And a 2007 Intergovernmental Panel on ...

  • Adapting agricultural water to climate change

    This policy brief, published by the Overseas Development Institute (ODI), examines the relationship between climate change, water and food security and outlines potential adaptation strategies and policy priorities for developing countries. Agriculture in developing countries is already under pressure from growing populations, industrialisation and environmental degradation. Climate change is ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Congressional briefing: climate change and agriculture

    Event Wednesday June 16 on Climate Change and Agriculture: Food and Farming in a Changing Climate Experts to discuss climate change impacts and agricultural adaptation strategies.   What: Briefing on agricultural adaptation to climate change, featuring presentations from experts in the fields of agriculture, climate change, and economics.   ...

  • Cereal Crops Feeling the Heat

    LIVERMORE, California (ENS) - Warming temperatures since 1981 have caused annual losses of about US$5 billion for six major cereal crops, new research has found. This is the first study to estimate how much global food production already has been affected by climate change. From 1981 to 2002, fields of wheat, corn and barley throughout the world have produced a combined 40 million ...

  • Water demand for crops may rise in northern Germany under warmer climate

    By 2070, there may be insufficient water for irrigation to ensure yields and profitability for some crops currently grown in northern Germany - if the IPCC´s worst case climate change scenario becomes a reality - new research warns. To reduce future demand for water under a changing climate, the study suggests that farmers grow different crops and change their management practices. In ...

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