common wheat News

  • Farmers fund research to breed gluten-free wheat

    Kansas farmers are paying for genetic research to figure out exactly why some people struggle to digest wheat. The hard science is aimed at developing new varieties of wheat at a time when the gluten-free industry is worth nearly a billion dollars a year in the U.S. alone. The Kansas Wheat Commission is spending $200,000 for the first two years of the project, which is meant to identify ...


    By Associated Press

  • Syngenta acquires leading Italian durum wheat seed company

    Syngenta announced today that it has acquired Società Produttori Sementi (PSB), one of Italy's oldest seed companies and a leader in durum wheat breeding and production for pasta. PSB was established in the province of Bologna in 1911, and its durum wheat varieties are grown on more than 330,000 hectares. In addition to its headquarters and a 430-hectare farm, PSB has breeding programs in ...


    By Syngenta

  • EC proposes new Common Agricultural Policy measures to tackle climate change, biofuel production and water management

    The European Commission today unveiled its blueprint for streamlining and further modernising the European Union's Common Agricultural Policy. The so-called 'Health Check' of the CAP will build on the approach which began with the 2003 reforms, improve the way the policy operates based on the experience gathered since 2003 and make it fit for the new challenges and opportunities in an EU of 27 ...

  • Added bonus for grass weed control

    Certis' straight flufenacet herbicides, Sunfire and System 50 have been granted an Extension Authorisation for Minor Use (EAMU) on Rye and Triticale, for the control of black-grass and annual meadow grass. Already widely used in barley and wheat crops, and showing good control of black-grass and other significant grass weeds, this comes as a welcome addition for growers of Rye and Triticale as ...


    By Certis UK

  • WIWAM Conveyor was presented at the `Cereal Future Forum`

    From February 11-12, 2015, Bayer CropScience organized ‘the Cereal Future Forum’ in Brussels. Around 230 participants from 30 countries joined the 2-day conference on the future of wheat production in the world. The last day, the Cereal Future Forum moved to Ghent for a guided tour at Bayer CropScience and the VIB Department of Plant Systems Biology, UGent. During the visit, WIWAM ...


    By SMO bvba - WIWAM

  • Soil phosphorus in an organic cropping system

    Phosphorus is a nonrenewable resource, raising concerns that agricultural practices may deplete reserves. (For one overview discussion of phosphorus, see Phosphorus Famine: The Threat to Our Food Supply in the June 2009 Scientific American.) Organic farming with low phosphorus  inputs can result in deficient levels of plant-available phosphorus (available-P).A group of researchers from ...


    By American Society of Agronomy

  • The effects of agricultural land use change on farmland birds in Sweden

    The effects of changing agricultural practices on farmland birds are explored in a recently published study from Sweden. Overall abundance of 16 common species declined by 23% between 1994 and 2004, which may be partly caused by changes in land use, such as an increase in the amount of wheat cropland. However, effects vary between species, and some species increased or stayed stable in number. ...

  • Life cycle study demonstrates the long-term costs of everyday crops

    The environmental and economic costs of a selection of common crops have been determined by a new study, which hopes to improve agricultural sustainability assessments in Europe. The researchers used life cycle analysis on organically farmed tomatoes and pears, and intensively farmed wheat, apples, and lettuce to show the overall impact of agricultural methods. Agriculture accounts for 45% of ...

  • Research collaboration to deliver ‘healthier’ grains

    The new ‘High Fibre Grains Cluster’ will focus on wheat, barley and rice. One of the primary research goals is to boost the amount of beneficial compounds, such as beta glucans and arabinoxylans, which are key contributors to the soluble component of dietary fibre in the various grains. The collaboration between CSIRO’s Food Futures Flagship, The University of Adelaide, The ...

  • American society of agronomy presents 2011 class of fellows

    The American Society of Agronomy (ASA) will recognize the following individuals at the 2011 Awards Ceremony during their Annual Meeting on Oct. 16-19 in San Antonio, TX, www.acsmeetings.org. ASA has been selecting outstanding members as Fellows since 1924. Members of the Society nominate worthy colleagues based on their professional achievements ...

  • Rust on Corn More Prevalent This Summer

    Resembling rust on a pickup, a fungal disease that can afflict corn has been confirmed in a higher than usual number of cornfields in southern Ohio. Southern rust (pictured above) and common rust have attacked a higher than usual number of southern Ohio fields this year. Every year, some Ohio farmers find southern or common rust on their corn plants, but this year both diseases have been more ...


    By Ohio State University

  • Grassy field margins enhance soil biodiversity

    Grass strips at field margins are almost as valuable as hedgerows in encouraging diversity of soil creatures, according to new research. Six metre wide margin strips increase the number and variety of species such as earthworms, woodlice and beetles, and may act as corridors between isolated habitats. The study analysed the presence of invertebrates of three main feeding types - soil ingesters ...

  • Pigeon pea genome sequence could boost yields

    More than a billion people could soon benefit from improved yields of the important drought-resistant crop pigeon pea now that its genome has been sequenced by a global partnership. The sequence, published online in Nature Biotechnology last week (6 November), should cut the time it takes to develop higher-yielding pigeon pea varieties from the 6–10 years required for traditional breeding ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Resistance genes from wild relatives of crops offer opportunities for more sustainable agriculture worldwidew

    Growing crops with stacks of two or more resistance genes from closely related species, introduced into the crop via for instance genetic engineering, combined with the simultaneous introduction of resistance management, can ensure the long-term resistance of these plants to economically significant and aggressive diseases. The combination offers opportunities to make agriculture more sustainable ...

  • Some plants are more sensitive to herbicides during reproductive stages of life cycle

    This study assessed the effects of herbicides on non-target plants in Denmark and Canada. The findings showed that some plants are more sensitive to herbicides in the reproductive stages of their life cycle and can experience delays in flowering and reduced seed production. The authors say future ecological assessments should consider reproductive outcomes. Herbicides are some of the most widely ...

  • Testing new biological plant protection products for effectiveness and practical feasibility

    A naturally occurring fungus codenamed ‘H39’ might be the long-sought biological defence against the dreaded apple scab. “This fungus has not only been tested for its ability to fight the pathogen. The new Select BioControl method was also used to immediately assess the practical feasibility of deploying it as a commercial product,” says Dr Jürgen Köhl of ...

  • Beast of a weed creeping across Midwest from south

    It's a beast of a weed, creeping north into the Midwest from cotton country. Palmer amaranth can shoot up as high as 7 feet, and just one plant can produce up to a million seeds. Herbicide is increasingly futile against it, and the weed's thick stems and deep roots make it hard work to clear by hand. It can slash yields and profits when it gets out of control. Midwestern weed scientists are ...


    By Associated Press

  • Bayer CropScience and Farm Frites jointly implement sustainable practices in European potato cultivation

    Bayer CropScience and Farm Frites recently started a Food Chain Partnership initiative designed to implement sustainable agricultural practices in potato cultivation in the Netherlands and Belgium. The goal of the partnership is to support a bottom-up approach with potato farmers addressing value-adding sustainable potato-growing practices at individual farm level. This is intended to minimize ...


    By Bayer CropScience AG

  • Rice Processing steps: From Pre-planting to Postproduction

    Rice, which is harvested each year with 154 million ha, is the most common grain as well as the most popular food in the world. Human consumption accounts for 85% of total production for rice, compared with 72% for wheat and 19% for maize. In addition, rice is the the most important crop for many of small farmers who grow it throughout the world, and the source of so many landless ...

  • ADM to Acquire GrainCorp

    Archer Daniels Midland Company (NYSE: ADM) announced today that it has completed due diligence on GrainCorp Limited (ASX: GNC) and intends to make a cash offer to acquire the outstanding common shares of the company for A$12.20 per share under the terms of the takeover bid implementation deed signed with GrainCorp last week. “We believe the offer delivers strong value for both ...

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