corn cob News

  • Corn set to reduce incidence of blindness

    A new sweet corn hybrid is on track to reduce the incidence of blindness, following a six year research project funded by HAL using voluntary contributions and matched funds from the Australian government. Sweet corn is one of the highest natural sources of a nutrient known as zeaxanthin, which has been found to slow eye diseases such as macular degeneration, the leading cause of blindness in ...

  • OSU Expert: Corn Stalks Are An Inexpensive Feed Source

    Livestock producers looking for a relatively easy and inexpensive feed source can turn to harvested cornfields for the answer. The residue left on the field after harvesting corn can be used to meet the nutrient needs of ruminant livestock in early to mid-gestation, according to a forage expert from Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental ...


    By Ohio State University

  • Corn out earns energy crops—for now

    Corn stover is the most profitable cellulosic biofuel feedstock on cropland in the Great Lakes Region at current prices. For perennial biomass crops to earn farmers more than corn, prices or yields would have to change. At biomass prices of US$110–US$130 per metric ton or yield gains of 50–60%, poplar, switchgrass, and mixed grasses would become attractive. If prices of expensive U.S. miscanthus ...

  • Hammer Blower is a hammermill and forage blower, combined all in one unit

    Combining a powerful, hammermill with a high capacity, blower fan, Art’s Way’s new Hammer Blower is a versatile machine that can grind high moisture shelled or ear corn and blow the mixture up into a silo or bunk too. This machine can grind dry corn through a 1/8-inch screen directly into a truck with virtually no dust. ...

  • Farmers Now Harvesting Biomass for Project Liberty Opening

    Farmers are now harvesting and delivering cob bales for the 2014 opening of Project LIBERTY in Emmetsburg, Iowa. Project LIBERTY is POET-DSM’s 20 million-gallon-per-year cellulosic bio-ethanol plant under construction today. The facility will use corn crop residue – cobs, leaves, husk and some stalk – to produce renewable fuel. Farmers for ...


    By POET, LLC

  • POET CEO responds to Supreme Court decision on E15

    POET CEO Jeff Lautt today issued the following statement regarding the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision not to hear the challenge by the oil industry and others of E15 (15 percent ethanol fuel) for cars and trucks 2001 and newer: “The Supreme Court’s decision today clears the way for more fuel options for U.S. drivers,” Lautt said. “We think drivers deserve reliable ...


    By POET, LLC

  • New USDA-ISU Report Validates Cellulosic Ethanol Biomass Sustainability

    Five years of soil nutrient data gathered at POET-DSM’s Project LIBERTY site are consistent with more than 500 site-years of additional soil research, experts at USDA and Iowa State University have determined. Those results show that biomass harvesting, which is now being done in the Emmetsburg, Iowa area, is consistent with proper farm management. “Successful deployment ...


    By POET, LLC

  • Latest LIBERTY agronomic data shows viability of biomass harvesting

    Harvesting crop residue for cellulosic ethanol production is consistent with good farm management, according to the latest data from researchers with Iowa State University and USDA. The work was commissioned by POET-DSM Advanced Biofuels to ensure the sustainability of the joint ...


    By POET, LLC

  • Hudson Valley organic farm produces seeds largely by hand

    Drying corn stalks wilt in late summer sun as Ken Greene tours his crops. Calendula flowers are past bloom and brown. Melon leaves lay crinkled by the dirt. Plants have, literally, gone to seed. A perfect picture for an organic seed harvest. "It looks like hell now, but it's actually good for the seeds," said Greene, co-founder of the Hudson Valley Seed Library. The small business 70 miles ...


    By Associated Press

  • Fertilizer run-off killing Gulf of Mexico marine life

    Improved management of crops and perennials could go a long way toward alleviating the problem of hypoxia, which claims thousands of fish, shrimp and shellfish in the Gulf of Mexico each spring. An assessment by a team led by Virginia Dale of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Environmental Sciences Division concludes that low oxygen levels in water, or hypoxia, causes problems throughout the ...

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