corn field News

  • Late Corn Better Than Blighted Corn

    Growers whose corn crops were harmed by excessive rain in April and May likely will have enough growing days left in the season if they replant in the next two to three weeks, according to an Ohio State University agronomist. “If they replanted soon, it would probably be much better than to have a poor stand,” said Peter Thomison, an agronomist with Ohio State University Extension, ...


    By Ohio State University

  • Canadian Farmers to Access Enlist™ Corn Through Field Forward™ Program

    Dow AgroSciences, a wholly-owned subsidiary of The Dow Chemical Company (NYSE: Dow), announced a limited commercial introduction of Enlist™ corn in Canada for the 2014 growing season. The company’s Canada Field Forward program will provide growers with an exclusive opportunity to experience the company’s newest technologies under carefully stewarded conditions before they are ...


    By Dow AgroSciences LLC

  • Rust on Corn More Prevalent This Summer

    Resembling rust on a pickup, a fungal disease that can afflict corn has been confirmed in a higher than usual number of cornfields in southern Ohio. Southern rust (pictured above) and common rust have attacked a higher than usual number of southern Ohio fields this year. Every year, some Ohio farmers find southern or common rust on their corn plants, but this year both diseases have been more ...


    By Ohio State University

  • Amisy Self-propelled Corn Harvester

    Amisy Self-propelled Corn Harvester The economical use of original high-quality cutting components and wear parts can be considerably improved by proper ...


    By Amisy Farming Machinery

  • Study finds that residential lawns release more carbon dioxide than corn fields

    More carbon dioxide is released from residential lawns than corn fields according to a new study. And much of the difference can likely be attributed to soil temperature. The data, from researchers at Elizabethtown College, suggest that urban heat islands may be working at smaller scales than previously thought. These findings provide a better understanding of the changes that occur when ...

  • Ohio State Expert: Rootless Corn Can Recover

    Rootless or “floppy” corn may look questionable, but under the right conditions, it can recover. Corn crops that are leaning or lodged may be impacted by rootless corn syndrome, said Peter Thomison, an Ohio State University Extension agronomist. OSU Extension is the statewide outreach arm of the university’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. ...


    By Ohio State University

  • OSU Expert: Corn Stalks Are An Inexpensive Feed Source

    Livestock producers looking for a relatively easy and inexpensive feed source can turn to harvested cornfields for the answer. The residue left on the field after harvesting corn can be used to meet the nutrient needs of ruminant livestock in early to mid-gestation, according to a forage expert from Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental ...


    By Ohio State University

  • Corn out earns energy crops—for now

    Corn stover is the most profitable cellulosic biofuel feedstock on cropland in the Great Lakes Region at current prices. For perennial biomass crops to earn farmers more than corn, prices or yields would have to change. At biomass prices of US$110–US$130 per metric ton or yield gains of 50–60%, poplar, switchgrass, and mixed grasses would become attractive. If prices of expensive U.S. miscanthus ...

  • Syngenta announces corn traits licensing agreement

    Syngenta announced today an expansion of its licensing collaboration with KWS and Limagrain and their joint ventures AgReliant and Genective. The new agreement is for 20 years and covers the AgReliant business in North America and the individual operations of the two companies outside North America. Under the terms of the agreement, Syngenta will provide worldwide rights to its current and future ...


    By Syngenta

  • Silage Safety Begins in the Field

    To reduce the risk of deadly silage gas later in the year, correctly prepare and harvest forages. “Quality silage starts all the way back in the field — and so does overall silage safety,” says Renato Schmidt, Ph.D., Technical Services Forage, Lallemand Animal Nutrition. “Dangerous gases can be produced naturally during the early stages of the ensiling process. The right ...


    By Lallemand Animal Nutrition

  • Silage Safety Begins in the Field

    To reduce the risk of deadly silage gas later in the year, correctly prepare and harvest forages. “Quality silage starts all the way back in the field — and so does overall silage safety,” says Renato Schmidt, Ph.D., Technical Services Forage, Lallemand Animal Nutrition. “Dangerous gases can be produced naturally during the early stages of the ensiling process. The ...


    By Lallemand Animal Nutrition

  • Agribotix delivers critical corn count information using artificial intelligence

    Today, Agribotix announced the wider beta availability of its first plant count product.  Designed for corn growers, the product uses artificial intelligence (AI) to identify and count corn plants in drone-collected imagery while ignoring other items in the images.  By rapidly identifying areas where emergence is below expectations, growers can use the results to take actions which will ...


    By Agribotix LLC

  • Threat of Corn Flea Beetle, Stewart’s Bacterial Wilt Negligible in Ohio this Spring

    WOOSTER, Ohio – As farmers throughout the region deal with yet another blast of winter weather including cold temperatures, rain, sleet, snow and wind, there is at least one good thing that’s come from the unusually harsh season – a lessened chance for corn flea beetle infestation for Ohio corn this year. This means that growers scouting their fields this spring shouldn’t ...


    By Ohio State University

  • Can simple measures of labile soil organic matter predict corn performance?

    Organic matter is important for soil health and crop productivity. While an indicator of soil quality, a lot of organic matter is in extremely stable forms, and the nutrients in such forms are difficult for plants to use. The active, labile fraction, however, is a modest but important part of the organic matter. “The labile fraction is small – usually less than 20 or even 10 percent, ...

  • Corn colour can tell farmers how much fertilizer to apply

    Nitrogen fertilizer is a key ingredient for growing a good corn crop. It is not unusual for a well-fertilized crop to yield more than twice as much as an unfertilized crop. But how much nitrogen should corn producers apply to their crop? Researchers at the University of Missouri help answer this question in a study of how much light is reflected from corn plants reported in the May–June issue of ...

  • 2014 Guide on Corn, Soybean, Wheat and Alfalfa Available for Growers

    With wet weather continuing to create harvest and planting delays, a new guide developed by agronomists from Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences is available to help growers check their crops’ development. The 2014 Corn, Soybean, Wheat and Alfalfa Field Guide is now available for $12.50 and can be purchased through the ...


    By Ohio State University

  • Agronomists Offer Webinars for Corn, Soybean and Wheat Growers Feb. 11 and 25

    Growers wanting to learn more about corn yield optimization, corn seed treatments and high-input soybean production can take advantage of a series of upcoming webinars taught by agronomists from Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences.            The webinars offer participants insight into some of the key issues ...


    By Ohio State University

  • Ohio State Agronomists Offer Free Webinars for Corn, Soybean and Wheat Growers

    Growers wanting to learn more about managing herbicides, fungicides and resistance, corn yield optimization, corn seed treatments and high-input soybean production can take advantage of a series of free webinars taught by agronomists from Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences.            The webinars offer ...


    By Ohio State University

  • USDA approves new modified corn seeds, soybean seeds

    The Agriculture Department has approved the use of genetically modified corn seeds and soybean seeds that are resistant to a popular weed killer. However, farmers won't be able to take full advantage of the seeds until the Environmental Protection Agency issues a second ruling allowing the use of Enlist, a new version of the 2,4-D weed killer that's been around since the 1940s. The EPA has said ...


    By Associated Press

  • USDA Issues Thorough Final EIS on Enlist™ Corn and Soybeans

    The release of the USDA’s Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) on EnlistTM corn and soybeans today brings American farmers one step closer to obtaining a critical tool needed to manage resistant and hard-to-control weeds. The technology will help raise crop outputs to meet growing demand and provide a boost to the environment and economy. The only remaining action before ...


    By Dow AgroSciences LLC

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