corn planting News

  • Beast of a weed creeping across Midwest from south

    It's a beast of a weed, creeping north into the Midwest from cotton country. Palmer amaranth can shoot up as high as 7 feet, and just one plant can produce up to a million seeds. Herbicide is increasingly futile against it, and the weed's thick stems and deep roots make it hard work to clear by hand. It can slash yields and profits when it gets out of control. Midwestern weed scientists are ...


    By Associated Press

  • SG Biofuels Develops Jatropha Hybrid Seed Production Technology

    SAN DIEGO - SG Biofuels, a bioenergy crop company developing and producing elite seeds of Jatropha, today announced it has established a proprietary technology for large-scale Jatropha hybrid seed production.  Hybrid seeds result in greater yield, uniformity and vigor while significantly reducing handling and deployment costs for plantation developers. The company ...


    By SGB, Inc.

  • Decision could boost use of popular weed killer

    Faced with tougher and more resistant weeds, corn and soybean farmers are anxiously awaiting government decisions on a new version of a popular herbicide - and on genetically modified seeds to grow crops designed to resist it. Critics say more study is needed on the effects of the herbicide and they are concerned it could endanger public health. The Environmental Protection Agency is expected to ...


    By Associated Press

  • Confirmed speakers from 32 countries from all continents

    World Bioenergy is truly a global event. There are confirmed speakers from 32 countries from all continents, and a couple more may be added in the coming days. An example of the many speakers from outside Europe is Abbas Almodares from University of Isfahan in Iran. He will speak about bioethanol production from dried sweet sorghum stalks. Professor Almodares is an expert on sorghum, a ...


    By Elmia AB

  • Confirmed speakers from 32 countries from all continents

    World Bioenergy is truly a global event. There are confirmed speakers from 32 countries from all continents, and a couple more may be added in the coming days. An example of the many speakers from outside Europe is Abbas Almodares from University of Isfahan in Iran. He will speak about bioethanol production from dried sweet sorghum stalks. Professor Almodares is an expert on sorghum, a plant that ...


    By Elmia AB

  • Syngenta`s Mary-Dell Chilton named 2013 World Food Prize laureate

    U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry today presided over a ceremony at which distinguished Syngentascientist Mary-Dell Chilton, Ph.D., was named a laureate of the prestigious 2013 World Food Prize. The prize is the foremost international award recognizing individuals who have enhanced human development by improving the quality, quantity or availability of food in the ...


    By Syngenta

  • Ethanol`s rise can mean loss of hunting lands

    Pheasants once drew hundreds of weekend hunters to Fairbury, Neb., each fall, filling the 45 rooms at Randy Brown's Capri Motel with sportsmen eager to bag their limits. But times have changed. The native grasslands and milo crops that used to dot surrounding Jefferson County have been overtaken by corn and soy crops. Neither provides the shelter that wildlife once enjoyed. This year's opener ...


    By Associated Press

  • New USDA-ISU Report Validates Cellulosic Ethanol Biomass Sustainability

    Five years of soil nutrient data gathered at POET-DSM’s Project LIBERTY site are consistent with more than 500 site-years of additional soil research, experts at USDA and Iowa State University have determined. Those results show that biomass harvesting, which is now being done in the Emmetsburg, Iowa area, is consistent with proper farm management. “Successful deployment ...


    By POET, LLC

  • POET CEO responds to Supreme Court decision on E15

    POET CEO Jeff Lautt today issued the following statement regarding the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision not to hear the challenge by the oil industry and others of E15 (15 percent ethanol fuel) for cars and trucks 2001 and newer: “The Supreme Court’s decision today clears the way for more fuel options for U.S. drivers,” Lautt said. “We think drivers deserve reliable ...


    By POET, LLC

  • Hawaii is genetically engineered crop flash point

    You can trace the genetic makeup of most corn grown in the U.S., and in many other places around the world, to Hawaii. The tiny island state 2,500 miles from the nearest continent is so critical to the nation's modern corn-growing business that the industry's leading companies all have farms here, growing new varieties genetically engineered for desirable traits like insect and drought ...


    By Associated Press

  • Precision Agriculture Webinar offered Jan. 20

    The more data farmers and producers can access regarding their fields, the better they can make decisions regarding how to manage their farm operations, experts say. But boiling down information from field monitored data, satellite data and remote sensing data captured using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles can sometimes be challenging, said Greg LaBarge, an Ohio State University Extension field ...


    By Ohio State University

  • Comparing soybean production methods

    In the Mid-South, twin-row soybean production is becoming a popular growing technique for soybean producers. An estimated 80% of the total hectares grown in the Mississippi Delta are planted in this configuration. While growers report this method increases seed yields, especially when used with specific cultivars planted in April or early May, there is no research data to support their claims. ...

  • America`s Emerging Bioeconomy

    AMES, Iowa, August 30, 2007 (ENS) - Robert Anex wants to know what would happen if the increasing demand for ethanol prompts American farmers to decide against crop rotation and plant corn on the same fields, year after year. This spring farmers responded to the ethanol industry's demand for grain by increasing their corn acreage by 19 percent over last year, according to U.S. ...

  • How to Keep Specialty Crops Safe from Herbicide Drift

    Ohio’s corn and soybean growers could soon be spraying a lot more of two powerful herbicides on their fields. That’s why agricultural experts from The Ohio State University are offering tips on how to keep those herbicides from getting onto other crops, especially valuable specialty crops such as grapes. Doug ...


    By Ohio State University

  • Prior herbicide use—not irrigation—is critical to herbicide efficacy

    Crop and herbicide use history are more critical to herbicide efficacy and environmental safety than the timing and amount of irrigation water used, according to Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists. ARS plant physiologists Dale Shaner and Lori Wiles made this discovery from ongoing experiments on two irrigated fields at Colorado State University (CSU) at Fort Collins, Colo. Shaner and ...

  • Straw residue helps keep nitrogen on the farm

    Scientists are exploring ways to reduce non-point pollution from agriculture. A new study finds that using straw residue in conjunction with legume cover crops reduces leaching of nitrogen into waterways, but may lower economic return. Agriculture is the largest source of nitrogen non-point pollution to waterways in the United States, flowing into streams and rivers via erosion from farmlands, or ...

  • Scientists Develop Fast-Growing Sorghum for Biofuel

    COLLEGE STATION, Texas, October 9, 2007 (ENS) - American cars and trucks may soon be fueled with sorghum. Not used widely as a food grain in the United States, sorghum is one of the five top cereal crops in the world, along with wheat, oats, corn, and barley. It was cultivated in Egypt in ancient times, and Africa still is the largest producer of sorghum today. Now, energy crop ...

  • Easing the soil’s temperature

    Soil characteristics like organic matter content and moisture play a vital role in helping plants flourish. It turns out that soil temperature is just as important. Every plant needs a certain soil temperature to thrive. If the temperature changes too quickly, plants won’t do well. Their seeds won’t germinate or their roots will die. “Most plants are sensitive to extreme ...

  • Squeezing more crop out of each drop of water

    Studies in China and Colorado by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists and cooperators have revealed some interesting tactics on how to irrigate with limited water, based on a crop’s critical growth stages. Laj Ahuja, research leader at the ARS Agricultural Systems Research Unit in Fort Collins, Colo., and colleagues conducted the studies. As one example, with wheat in China, they found ...

  • Fertilizer industry grows despite safety concerns

    In years past, Brian Moody's efforts to bring economic development to his small Illinois town focused on modest projects: merging an old hardware store whose owner was retiring with another shop to preserve 30 jobs or pointing artists to a vacant downtown building. Now he has a bigger prospect. Cronus Chemicals wants to build a $1.2 billion plant on a nearby cornfield that would manufacture ...


    By Associated Press

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