corn planting News

  • 12 Innovations to combat drought, improve food security, and stabilize food prices

    Soaring temperatures and low precipitation could not occur at a worse time for many farmers in the United States. Intensifying drought conditions are affecting corn and soybean crops throughout the Midwest, raising grain prices as well as concerns about future food prices. The U.S. Drought Monitor reports that 88 percent of this year’s corn crop and 77 percent of the soybean crop are now ...


    By Worldwatch Institute

  • Confirmed speakers from 32 countries from all continents

    World Bioenergy is truly a global event. There are confirmed speakers from 32 countries from all continents, and a couple more may be added in the coming days. An example of the many speakers from outside Europe is Abbas Almodares from University of Isfahan in Iran. He will speak about bioethanol production from dried sweet sorghum stalks. Professor Almodares is an expert on sorghum, a ...


    By Elmia AB

  • Beast of a weed creeping across Midwest from south

    It's a beast of a weed, creeping north into the Midwest from cotton country. Palmer amaranth can shoot up as high as 7 feet, and just one plant can produce up to a million seeds. Herbicide is increasingly futile against it, and the weed's thick stems and deep roots make it hard work to clear by hand. It can slash yields and profits when it gets out of control. Midwestern weed scientists are ...


    By Associated Press

  • Conservation Tillage Conference March 2-3 Offers Tips for Farmers in Tight Economy

    High input costs coupled with low grain prices anticipated in 2016 means that growers have to make smarter, calculated choices to grow profitable crops this year. Also important is the need to build and maintain healthy soils to help ensure good water quality, said Randall Reeder, a retired Ohio State University Extension agricultural engineer. Reeder is an organizer of the annual Conservation ...


    By Ohio State University

  • Hawaii is genetically engineered crop flash point

    You can trace the genetic makeup of most corn grown in the U.S., and in many other places around the world, to Hawaii. The tiny island state 2,500 miles from the nearest continent is so critical to the nation's modern corn-growing business that the industry's leading companies all have farms here, growing new varieties genetically engineered for desirable traits like insect and drought ...


    By Associated Press

  • Syngenta`s Mary-Dell Chilton named 2013 World Food Prize laureate

    U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry today presided over a ceremony at which distinguished Syngentascientist Mary-Dell Chilton, Ph.D., was named a laureate of the prestigious 2013 World Food Prize. The prize is the foremost international award recognizing individuals who have enhanced human development by improving the quality, quantity or availability of food in the ...


    By Syngenta

  • The tiger in your tank was yesterday – soon it’ll be algae

    ”There’s no plant that has as much power as algae. That is why a lot of energy experts have high expectations of algae in the long run”, says Dr Martin Kerner, the Managing Director of SSC GmbH and the operator of a pilot plant in Hamburg-Reitbrook, which it is hoped will give a boost to research. Dr Kerner will be speaking at the exhibition and conference “waste to energy” which is being held in ...

  • Scientists Develop Fast-Growing Sorghum for Biofuel

    COLLEGE STATION, Texas, October 9, 2007 (ENS) - American cars and trucks may soon be fueled with sorghum. Not used widely as a food grain in the United States, sorghum is one of the five top cereal crops in the world, along with wheat, oats, corn, and barley. It was cultivated in Egypt in ancient times, and Africa still is the largest producer of sorghum today. Now, energy crop ...

  • Weather Fluctuations Impact Soybeans Less Than Other Field Crops

    From freezing temperatures and snow flurries to sunny, 80-degree days in a span of a week — if this type of strange weather continues, growers across Ohio want to know, will this have a negative impact on soybean crops? Not really, according to a field crops expert in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University.   Laura Lindsey, a soybean ...


    By Ohio State University

  • Comparing soybean production methods

    In the Mid-South, twin-row soybean production is becoming a popular growing technique for soybean producers. An estimated 80% of the total hectares grown in the Mississippi Delta are planted in this configuration. While growers report this method increases seed yields, especially when used with specific cultivars planted in April or early May, there is no research data to support their claims. ...

  • Fertilizer industry grows despite safety concerns

    In years past, Brian Moody's efforts to bring economic development to his small Illinois town focused on modest projects: merging an old hardware store whose owner was retiring with another shop to preserve 30 jobs or pointing artists to a vacant downtown building. Now he has a bigger prospect. Cronus Chemicals wants to build a $1.2 billion plant on a nearby cornfield that would manufacture ...


    By Associated Press

  • Grass strips help curb erosion, herbicide transport

    Grass filter strips placed in riparian zones not only curb soil erosion, but can help block and degrade the widely used herbicide atrazine, Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists report. Atrazine has been used extensively to suppress weeds in corn production for decades, but because it's applied directly to soil it's especially prone to losses in surface runoff. The contamination of ...

  • America`s Emerging Bioeconomy

    AMES, Iowa, August 30, 2007 (ENS) - Robert Anex wants to know what would happen if the increasing demand for ethanol prompts American farmers to decide against crop rotation and plant corn on the same fields, year after year. This spring farmers responded to the ethanol industry's demand for grain by increasing their corn acreage by 19 percent over last year, according to U.S. ...

  • Precision Agriculture Webinar offered Jan. 20

    The more data farmers and producers can access regarding their fields, the better they can make decisions regarding how to manage their farm operations, experts say. But boiling down information from field monitored data, satellite data and remote sensing data captured using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles can sometimes be challenging, said Greg LaBarge, an Ohio State University Extension field ...


    By Ohio State University

  • EPA Region 7 issues notice of violation to Grain Processing Corporation, Inc., of Muscatine, Iowa, for clean air act issues

    EPA has issued a notice of violation to Grain Processing Corporation, Inc. (GPC), alleging the company has violated the Iowa State Implementation Plan and the federal Clean Air Act for issues related to construction and operating permits issued for its facility at Muscatine, Iowa. EPA Region 7 has coordinated with the State of Iowa on the notice of violation, which is separate from a civil ...

  • Typhoon-stricken farmers receive first emergency seeds

    One month after Typhoon Haiyan struck a devastating blow to the Philippines, farmers who lost essential crops and supplies are receiving the first wave of emergency seeds, restoring hope for a productive planting season and much-needed food for the coming year. FAO and the Philippines' Department of Agriculture (DA) have begun delivering the first rice and corn seed allocations to rural ...

  • Marrone Bio Innovations` Regalia® Biofungicide Label Significantly Expanded

      DAVIS, Calif., Jan. 18, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- Marrone Bio Innovations today announced that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has approved a significant label expansion for Regalia®, a biofungicide that boosts plants' natural defenses to fight fungal and bacterial diseases. The label expansion includes new soil applications, ...

  • Squeezing more crop out of each drop of water

    Studies in China and Colorado by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists and cooperators have revealed some interesting tactics on how to irrigate with limited water, based on a crop’s critical growth stages. Laj Ahuja, research leader at the ARS Agricultural Systems Research Unit in Fort Collins, Colo., and colleagues conducted the studies. As one example, with wheat in China, they found ...

  • Confirmed speakers from 32 countries from all continents

    World Bioenergy is truly a global event. There are confirmed speakers from 32 countries from all continents, and a couple more may be added in the coming days. An example of the many speakers from outside Europe is Abbas Almodares from University of Isfahan in Iran. He will speak about bioethanol production from dried sweet sorghum stalks. Professor Almodares is an expert on sorghum, a plant that ...


    By Elmia AB

  • Prior herbicide use—not irrigation—is critical to herbicide efficacy

    Crop and herbicide use history are more critical to herbicide efficacy and environmental safety than the timing and amount of irrigation water used, according to Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists. ARS plant physiologists Dale Shaner and Lori Wiles made this discovery from ongoing experiments on two irrigated fields at Colorado State University (CSU) at Fort Collins, Colo. Shaner and ...

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