cotton crop News

  • Early cotton planting requires irrigation

    Cotton growers can produce more cotton if they plant early, but not without irrigation. That’s the finding of an article published in the September-October 2010 Agronomy Journal, a publication of the American Society of Agronomy. Bill Pettigrew, a scientist with the USDA-Agricultural Research Service in Stoneville, Mississippi, tested the performance of cotton under irrigated and ...

  • Pakistan debates GM cotton’s success

    Pakistan is beset by conflicting claims over the success of genetically modified (GM) cotton, now grown in over 90 per cent of the 2.5 million hectares under cotton. The GM cotton variety — also called Bt cotton because it contains a gene taken from the soil bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis that resists ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Cement develops an appetite for C02

    Three new studies illuminate the sheer complexity of the aspect of climate science known as the carbon cycle − how carbon dioxide gets into the atmosphere and out again. Sometimes, human agency is at work, but nature takes care of it anyway – as one of the studies reveals in the case of cement, the world’s most widely-used building material. Zhu Liu, postdoctoral scholar at ...


    By Climate News Network

  • Volatile Cotton Sector Struggles to Balance Cost and Benefits

    Growing cotton provides livelihoods for an estimated 100 million households in as many as 85 countries. But adverse global market conditions and reliance on large doses of water, fertilizer, and pesticides impose considerable social and environmental costs, writes Michael Renner, senior researcher at the Worldwatch Institute, in the Institute’s latest Vital Signs Online article ( ...


    By Worldwatch Institute

  • GM cotton genes found in wild species

    Genetically modified (GM) cotton genes have been found in wild populations for the first time, making it the third plant species — after Brassica and bentgrass  — in which transgenes have established in the wild. The discovery was made in Mexico by six Mexican researchers investigating the flow of genes to wild cotton populations of the species Gossypium hirsutum. They found ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Impacts of tillage on soil and crops

    The increasing popularity of reduced tillage on crops has not only been an important development in combating soil erosion, but it has also been associated with increasing organic material and producing high crop yields. For peanut crops, however, reduced tillage has not gained a large acceptance as a viable practice, as findings of inconsistent yields have not encouraged farmers to make a switch ...


    By American Society of Agronomy

  • Sterile pest could do away with Bt cotton in Arizona

    Farmers in Arizona, United States, have all but eradicated a major pest from their land using a combination of genetically modified cotton and billions of sterilised versions of the pest's parent moth. The farmers had been growing Btcotton for several years. The cotton is genetically engineered to produce Bt toxin, which kills pink bollworm, a serious cotton pest. Bt cotton had reduced the pest ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • New John Deere CS690 Cotton Stripper Maximizes Harvest Efficiency

    Cotton harvest on the High Plains is often a race against the elements. Fall weather can deteriorate quickly, reducing cotton yields, grades and grower profits. The revolutionary new CS690 Cotton Stripper from John Deere features an onboard module-building system that protects lint quality and enables growers to harvest faster, with less labor and other costs. In addition, the non-stop ...


    By John Deere

  • Patents fail to boost crop yields

    Policies that secure intellectual property rights (IPRs) for agricultural innovations often fail to encourage technology transfer to developing countries or increase crop yields, a study shows. “Intellectual property rights are ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Helping farmers export `forgotten` crops

    In a global first, over 300 crop safety and pesticide management officials and other experts are meeting this week at FAO to discuss challenges associated with pesticide use on 'speciality crops' like garlic, ginger and chilies. The event starts today and runs through December 7. Unlike large-area crops such as corn, wheat, cotton or rice, specialty crops have traditionally been produced in ...

  • Using rotation crops to improve soil quality

    Soil quality issues are being researched within two crop rotation experiments that started in 1994 at Narrabri. They compare several crop rotations that include or exclude legume phases. The data presented here relate to the most recent 2-year cycles of these experiments. Following cotton harvest at the end of the previous cycle, rotation crops are sown (winter cereal, faba beans (grain) or vetch ...

  • Uganda starts `historic` trials on GM staple crops

    Ugandan researchers will carry out a series of field trials on some of the major food crops that have been genetically modified (GM), following several recent approvals by the Uganda National Biosafety Committee, despite a lack of clear legislation on commercialising any such products within the country. They will seek to develop both transgenic and conventional maize varieties tolerant to ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Crop Growers Told to Prepare for Low Price Era

    Following some of the best years ever for growing row crops, an agricultural economist advised farmers to prepare for several years of lower prices, at a workshop at the American Farm Bureau Federation’s 95th Annual Convention. “The last six years have been extraordinary years if you are a row crop producer,” said Matthew Roberts, an associate professor at Ohio State ...

  • Warming climate may devastate major US crops

    Three of the most important crops produced in the United States—corn, soybeans and cotton—are predicted to suffer declines of as much as 80 percent if temperatures continue to rise with manmade climate change, says a new study. In recent years, experts have debated whether human-induced global warming will cause crops to suffer or flourish, depending on the region and the crop. The new study, ...

  • Farm Bureau on USDA Report: Worldwide Corn Yields Up; Wheat, Cotton and Soybeans, Too

    The USDA’s latest report on agricultural supply and demand for the 2014-2015 marketing year suggests supplies will continue to be on the tight side for key U.S. crops despite record harvests, the American Farm Bureau Federation said today. “The most interesting feature of today’s World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates Report is the projected corn yield of 167.4 bushels ...

  • Crop Insurance Approved for Pivot-Irrigated Rice

    It has taken a lot of time and work (mostly by other people), but last week we finally got some good news in the pivot rice world. The USDA’s Risk Management Agency board of directors approved the application to provide crop insurance coverage for producers who want to grow rice with pivots. This means that by as early as next spring producers will be able to insure their pivot-irrigated ...


  • Wild Bee Decline Threatens U.S. Crop Production

    The first national study to map U.S. wild bees suggests they’re disappearing in many of the country’s most important farmlands — including California’s Central Valley, the Midwest’s corn belt and the Mississippi River valley. If losses of these crucial pollinators continue, the new nationwide assessment indicates that farmers will face increasing costs — and ...


    By University of Vermont

  • Carbon credits to be used to fund GM food crops

    US biotech firm Arcadia Biosciences has announced a plan to help fund the planting of genetically modified rice with carbon credits. The company will work with the Chinese government to give farmers who plant their crops carbon credits, which they can then sell on the global carbon trading market. Arcadia is touting its GM rice as a greener alternative to the regular crop. The plant has had a ...

  • North Florida farmers are using sesame as a rotation crop

    In between seasons of corn, peanut, and cotton, North Florida farmers were interested in growing a rotation crop that could withstand the wilting heat of summer and be harvested by machine. So, since 2011, University of Florida researchers have been experimenting with growing the tiny seeds you find on top of hamburger buns or garnishing salads – sesame – as a viable, money-making ...

  • Global Crop Protection Industry Outlook to 2016 - Bio-pesticides: The Next Generation Crop Protection Products

    Reportlinker.com announces that a new market research report is available in its catalogue: Global Crop Protection Industry Outlook to 2016 - Bio-pesticides: The Next Generation Crop Protection Products ...


    By ReportLinker

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