crop breeder News

  • Breeders and soil scientists join training fellowship on sustainable rice production systems in the midst of climate change

    IRRI Training Center, in collaboration with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), conducted a Regional group fellowship on phenotyping and integrated plant mutation breeding with best fit soil and water management practices for climate change adaptation from 01 to 25 July at IRRI Headquarters. The knowledge gained from the fellowship can help rice workers in creating sustainable rice ...

  • A long history but slow uptake of drought-tolerant crops

    In his opinion article, Drought-tolerance: a learning challenge for poor farmers, Travis Lybbert points to a growing interest in drought-tolerant (DT) crops in recent years, largely motivated by impending climate change. In fact, research and development ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Predicting disease and improving crops through genetics

    Can scientists accurately predict when an individual will develop a disease? What if we could predict how to increase drought resistance in plants? Or offer patients personalized medicine? Researchers are looking for answers to these questions and more using a plant or animal’s obvious traits, called phenotype prediction, a field that will be discussed in a free workshop presented by the ...

  • Plant bank to preserve biodiversity of Pacific crops

    The giant swamp taro, the orange-fleshed Fe'i banana and a coconut that grows to half a metre in length are among the native crop species to be saved in a major project that has begun across small islands in the Pacific. The Centre for Pacific Crops and Trees (CePaCT) is coordinating the project in which 1,000 unique varieties of staple fruit and vegetables from 7,500 Pacific islands are being ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Time is ticking for some crop`s wild relatives

    New edge of extinction research is creating a revival of conservation and interest in what these old plants mean to the future Experts and photos available on this topic! A botanist brings a species of alfalfa from Siberia, to the United States. His hope? The plant survives, and leads to a new winter-hardy alfalfa.  But what also happened during this time in ...

  • Crop Science Society of America Presents Awards in Long Beach

    The Crop Science Society of America (CSSA) will recognize the following individuals at the 2010 Awards Ceremony on Oct. 31-Nov. 3 during their Annual Meetings in Long Beach, CA, www.acsmeetings.org. The annual awards are presented for outstanding contributions to crop science through education, national and international service, and research. ...

  • Crop Science Society of America announces the 2010 class of fellows

    The CropScience Society of America(CSSA) will continue a time-honored tradition this year with the presentation of the following individuals as 2010 CSSA Fellows at a special Awards Ceremony during their Annual Meeting on Oct. 31-Nov. 3 in Long Beach, CA, www.acsmeetings.org. Members of the Society nominate worthy colleagues based on their professional ...

  • Norway invests $23.7 million in crop diversity to help farmers face climate change

    The government of Norway has pledged $23.7 million to conserve and sustainably manage the world's most important food crops, citing the critical need for crop diversity at a time when populations are soaring and climate change is threatening staples like rice and maize. "In just ten years we will have a billion more people at the global dinner table, but during that same time we could see climate ...

  • An Australian first for lupin genome project

    Being conducted in collaboration with the Centre for Food and Genomic Medicine (CFGM) in Perth, WA, the three-year, $1.5 million project will enable researchers and breeders to accelerate lupin crop improvements such as drought tolerance, disease resistance and optimal flowering time. The research team will build upon established resources and employ powerful next-generation sequencing ...

  • How to prevent the Xanthomonas bacterium from spreading

    Growers of strawberries and strawberry planting material are terrified of the quarantine organism Xanthomonas fragariae. If the bacterium is found, the affected parcel of land has to be partially or even fully cleared. Commissioned by trade association Plantum and the Strawberry Research Foundation, Wageningen UR performed research into how the pathogen is spread in order to prevent spreading. ...

  • Some but not all plants can defend themselves against disease on saline soil

    Some plants with resistance against a specific disease are also able to defend themselves effectively when they are stressed due to, for example, drought or saline soil. At the same time, the resistance of other plants no longer functions in these very same conditions. Although this had been assumed for some time, Wageningen scientist Christos Kissoudis is the first person to show why. As a ...

  • Rubisco activase best clue for better photosynthesis in fluctuating light

    Scientists and plant breeders who are aiming to improve food production by improving photosynthesis in crop plants, would make a good choice if they chose to change the composition and concentration of the protein Rubisco activase. In conditions where light intensity changes often and strongly, Rubisco activase is an important limiting factor in boosting the photosynthesis process when light ...

  • Disease-resistant wheat varieties debut in Kenya

    A multinational effort supported by the International Atomic Energy Agency and FAO marked a key milestone this week when a Kenyan university debuted two new varieties of disease-resistant wheat to the nation's farmers. Over the past two days, thousands of Kenyan farmers have visited Eldoret University in western Kenya for a two-day agriculture fair highlighting the latest farming technologies. ...

  • New button mushroom varieties need better protection

    A working group has recently been formed to work on a better protection of button mushroom varieties. It’s activities are firstly directed to generate consensus among the spawn/breeding companies to consider using fertile single spore cultures to improve strains as the generation of EDV’s. For this reason the working group has generated a position paper. The group consists of ...

  • New plant varieties developed to thrive despite climate change

    Nuclear technology is helping scientists unmask the hidden potential in plants, allowing plant breeders to develop new crop varieties that can withstand external stress such as drought, often brought about by climate change. Experts believe that climate change will affect the suitability of land for different types of crops, livestock, fish and pasture. It will also have an impact on the health ...

  • Bt cowpea could generate up to US$1 billion for small farmers

    A pest-resistant version of the black-eyed pea, a subspecies of the cowpea, is on track for commercial introduction, promising higher yields and claimed savings of up to US$1 billion of a crop that has found new popularity among African smallholders. The cowpea, actually a bean, is rich in protein and is an important crop for both tackling malnutrition and adapting to climate change as it ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Scientists find four-leaf clover gene

    Ending a period of “bad luck” for clover researchers, scientists report finding the gene that turns ordinary three-leaf clovers into the coveted four-leaf types. Masked by the three-leaf gene and strongly influenced by environmental condition, molecular markers now make it possible to detect the presence of the gene for four-leaves and for breeders to work with it. The results of the ...

  • Scientists claim GM cowpea could generate US$1 billion

    A pest-resistant version of the black-eyed pea, a subspecies of the cowpea, is on track for commercial introduction, promising higher yields and claimed savings of up to US$1 billion on a crop that has found new popularity among African smallholders. The cowpea, actually a bean, is rich in protein and is an important crop for both tackling malnutrition and adapting to climate change as it ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Independent variety trials show productivity of wheat varieties continues to increase

    Nowhere in the world is the average grain yield as high as in the Netherlands, where it is over ten tonnes per hectare. Research by Wageningen UR shows that the introduction of new varieties has caused yields to increase by approximately 8 to 10 per cent per decade. Converted to a hectare of winter wheat, this represents an increase of 800 to 1,000 kilograms; a huge achievement for breeders of ...

  • Peanuts: more genetically diverse than expected

    Virginia-type peanuts, the big ones sold in the shell or used in cocktail nut mixes, are more genetically variable than previously assumed, according to a new study from North Carolina State University. Before now, cultivated peanuts showed very little variability for molecular markers, leading some to conclude that there was virtually no genetic variation in the species. However, anyone who has ...

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