crop breeding News

  • Crop breeding gets boost from sweet potatoes

    In Uganda, the sweet potato is a major staple crop. Behind China and Nigeria, Uganda produces the most sweet potatoes in the world. Nationwide, families grow the crop to feed themselves, their livestock and to use as a source of income. Small scale agricultural operations use a large number of sweet potato varieties in their planting. These varieties are steadily being lost due to weevils, sweet ...

  • International crop breeding programme needed for African farming

    Climate change poses a large threat to African agriculture, but there is little research on how to respond. A recent study indicates that traditional adaptation methods are not enough and international collaboration is needed in 'planned adaptation' by collecting and conserving certain crops for the future. A large proportion of the African population - mainly the poor - depend on agriculture for ...

  • Farmers fund research to breed gluten-free wheat

    Kansas farmers are paying for genetic research to figure out exactly why some people struggle to digest wheat. The hard science is aimed at developing new varieties of wheat at a time when the gluten-free industry is worth nearly a billion dollars a year in the U.S. alone. The Kansas Wheat Commission is spending $200,000 for the first two years of the project, which is meant to identify ...


    By Associated Press

  • Saving wheat crops worldwide

    In a paper published in the prestigious journal Science, scientists from CSIRO Plant Industry, the University of Zurich and the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center have identified a wheat gene sequence which provides protection against leaf rust, stripe rust and powdery mildew. “Genetic disease resistance is highly desirable in plants as it is more environmentally friendly and ...

  • First quinoa crop harvested

    Wageningen UR researchers have developed three quinoa varieties suitable for cultivation in Europe. These new varieties were planted alongside each other on three Wageningen UR test fields last April. The earliest-ripening variety was harvested yesterday in Lelystad; the remaining two crops will be harvested from the other test fields in late August. The initial yields look quite promising. ...

  • ESA is recruiting a Technical Manager “Plant Breeding and Variety Registration”

    ESA European Seed Association (www.euroseeds.eu ) is recruiting a Technical Manager “Plant Breeding and Variety Registration” to work full time at the ESA General Secretariat’s office in Brussels, Belgium Job description: The Technical Manager “Plant Breeding and Variety Registration” will ...

  • Patents fail to boost crop yields

    Policies that secure intellectual property rights (IPRs) for agricultural innovations often fail to encourage technology transfer to developing countries or increase crop yields, a study shows. “Intellectual property rights are ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Predicting disease and improving crops through genetics

    Can scientists accurately predict when an individual will develop a disease? What if we could predict how to increase drought resistance in plants? Or offer patients personalized medicine? Researchers are looking for answers to these questions and more using a plant or animal’s obvious traits, called phenotype prediction, a field that will be discussed in a free workshop presented by the ...

  • Ceres Showcases Energy Crop Advances at Field Day

    Energy crop company Ceres, Inc. (Nasdaq: CERE) today hosted a bioenergy field day at the company’s 200-acre research center near Houston, Texas. The outdoor event, which draws industry representatives, policymakers and investors, highlighted innovations in the company’s development pipeline that are expected to increase yields and enable greater use of ...


    By Ceres

  • A long history but slow uptake of drought-tolerant crops

    In his opinion article, Drought-tolerance: a learning challenge for poor farmers, Travis Lybbert points to a growing interest in drought-tolerant (DT) crops in recent years, largely motivated by impending climate change. In fact, research and development ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Plant bank to preserve biodiversity of Pacific crops

    The giant swamp taro, the orange-fleshed Fe'i banana and a coconut that grows to half a metre in length are among the native crop species to be saved in a major project that has begun across small islands in the Pacific. The Centre for Pacific Crops and Trees (CePaCT) is coordinating the project in which 1,000 unique varieties of staple fruit and vegetables from 7,500 Pacific islands are being ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Ohio’s 2015 Wheat Crop Faced Tough Year

    Growers wondering how this year’s historic rains have impacted wheat now have proof that it has indeed been a tough year for the crop, according to the results of the 2015 Ohio Wheat Performance Test. The test results are offered by researchers with the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University and can be viewed at  ...


    By Ohio State University

  • Target the crop not the soil - to reduce fertiliser use

    Feed the crop not the soil’ is the message of a new review into sustainable phosphorus use. Currently, phosphorus fertiliser is applied to the soil, and plants then take it up through the roots. However, more precise nutrient management is needed on farms, the researchers say, so that the phosphorus is targeted at the crop just as it needs it. Modern agriculture is dependent on phosphorus, ...

  • The dire need to support ‘orphan crop’ research

    In spite of debate over its definition, the term ‘orphan crops’ refers to crops that are under-researched and underfunded due to their limited importance in the global market. These include cereals, legumes, vegetables, root crops, fodder crops, oil crops, fibre crops and ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Keeping tabs on the next generation of transgenic crops

    A team of government and university crop scientists from across Canada has developed a scientific framework for monitoring the release of second-generation genetically modified crops. The framework is designed to assess the risks of novel genes entering wild populations. First-generation genetically modified (GM)/transgenic crops with novel traits have been grown in a number of countries since ...

  • Second Generation Biodiesel Crops Topic of International Meeting

    India. – CJP – the advanced biofuel center will host a meeting in India  on opportunities and available technology for "second generation" Biodiesel crops crops such as Jatropha, Jojoba, Castor bean, Pongamia, Moringa , Simarouba and Algae. The 7th Global Jatropha World 3.0 ...


    By Advanced Biofuel Center

  • GM crops can thrive as climate warms

    Genetically engineering photosynthesis in plants could take advantage of rising global temperatures and increased levels of carbon dioxide, US scientists say. They believe this could achieve much higher yields on the same amount of land and help to stave off the prospect of widespread hunger as human populations increase. Researchers at ...


    By Climate News Network

  • Crop Science Society of America Presents Awards in Long Beach

    The Crop Science Society of America (CSSA) will recognize the following individuals at the 2010 Awards Ceremony on Oct. 31-Nov. 3 during their Annual Meetings in Long Beach, CA, www.acsmeetings.org. The annual awards are presented for outstanding contributions to crop science through education, national and international service, and research. ...

  • USDA awards more than US$28m in specialty crop research

    Agriculture Secretary Ed Schafer has announced that USDA awarded more than $28 million through the Specialty Crop Research Initiative (SCRI) to solve critical specialty crop agriculture issues, address priorities and solve problems through multifunctional research and extension. The Specialty Crop Research Initiative was established by the 2008 Farm Bill to support the specialty crop industry by ...

  • Crops and Weeds: Global climate change`s first responders

    A team of Agricultural Research Service (ARS) plant physiologists is studying how global climate change could affect food crop production--and prompt the evolution of even more resilient weeds. Lewis Ziska, Richard Sicher and Jim Bunce all work at the ARS Crops Systems and Global Change Laboratory in Beltsville, Md. Over the past several years, the three scientists have conducted research on a ...

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