crop drying News

  • World Soil Day hails symbiotic role of pulses to boost sustainable agriculture

    Soil and pulses can make major contributions to the challenge of feeding the world's growing population and combating climate change, especially when deployed together, according to Soils and Pulses: Symbiosis for Life, a new report by the UN Food and Agriculture Organization released on  ...

  • Cereal Crops Feeling the Heat

    LIVERMORE, California (ENS) - Warming temperatures since 1981 have caused annual losses of about US$5 billion for six major cereal crops, new research has found. This is the first study to estimate how much global food production already has been affected by climate change. From 1981 to 2002, fields of wheat, corn and barley throughout the world have produced a combined 40 million ...

  • Motorizing Sudanese crop irrigation

    The parched landscape of Sudan, on the southern edge of the Sahara desert, is among the world's driest regions, with a nine-month dry season and a highly unreliable rainy season. Large-scale farmers there manage to grow about half of the impoverished nation's food production with the help of motorized irrigation pumps, but for individual subsistence farmers and their families--about two-thirds of ...

  • Biodiesel Crop of the Week: Pongamia Pinnata

    Pongamia is an ancient tree that is native to India. It is frost tolerant, but not freeze-proof. It is also happens to be a legume, which is at the heart of what makes the business model so interesting. The tree yields a generous annual nut crop that is harvested with conventional shakers, such as those used by almond and other nut growers. That seed has approximately a 40 percent oil content ...


    By Advanced Biofuel Center

  • Bhutan faces crop losses from erratic climate

    Agricultural experts in the Himalayan country of Bhutan — a least developed country — are concerned at increasing crop losses in recent years, attributable to global warming. The losses, which began around 2004, are the direct result of increasing pest attacks and disease, erratic rainfall, windstorms, droughts, flash floods and landslides, officials said. The country’s ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Rise in CO2 could restrict growing days for crops

    The positive consequences of climate change may not be so positive. Although plants in the colder regions are expected to thrive as average global temperatures rise, even this benefit could be limited. Some tropical regions could lose up to 200 growing days a year, and more than two billion rural people could see their hopes wither on the vine or in the field. Even in temperate zones, there will ...


    By Climate News Network

  • A long history but slow uptake of drought-tolerant crops

    In his opinion article, Drought-tolerance: a learning challenge for poor farmers, Travis Lybbert points to a growing interest in drought-tolerant (DT) crops in recent years, largely motivated by impending climate change. In fact, research and development ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Dealing with difficult powdery mildew infections on ornamental crops

    We are now at the peak of the powdery mildew season and, with increasing temperatures and dry weather conditions, susceptible crops are likely to be at high risk of infection. The pathogen There are five different powdery mildew species which attack ornamental crops in the UK. Erysiphe ssp. – this pathogen is mainly ...


    By Certis UK

  • Crop Insurance Approved for Pivot-Irrigated Rice

    It has taken a lot of time and work (mostly by other people), but last week we finally got some good news in the pivot rice world. The USDA’s Risk Management Agency board of directors approved the application to provide crop insurance coverage for producers who want to grow rice with pivots. This means that by as early as next spring producers will be able to insure their pivot-irrigated ...


  • Improve crop yield by removing manure solids

    Manure has long been used as a crop fertilizer, but the challenge of finding an efficient use of the nutrients found in manure is ever present. The ratio of nitrogen to phosphorus in manure is low in relation to the nutrient needs of most crops. Therefore, crops tend to be overloaded with manure to meet the nitrogen requirement of agricultural crops, but the excess phosphorus from the process can ...

  • Some Midwest farmers` crops falter in record rains

    Weeks of record rainfalls drenched Don Lamb's cornfields this summer, drowning some plants and leaving others yellowed, 2 feet tall and capable of producing little, if any, grain. The 48-year-old central Indiana farmer can't recall anything like the deluges he's seen from late May on this summer; the latest was a 4-inch downpour a week ago. Neither can his father, who's been farming for 50 years. ...


    By Associated Press

  • North Florida farmers are using sesame as a rotation crop

    In between seasons of corn, peanut, and cotton, North Florida farmers were interested in growing a rotation crop that could withstand the wilting heat of summer and be harvested by machine. So, since 2011, University of Florida researchers have been experimenting with growing the tiny seeds you find on top of hamburger buns or garnishing salads – sesame – as a viable, money-making ...

  • Crop breeding gets boost from sweet potatoes

    In Uganda, the sweet potato is a major staple crop. Behind China and Nigeria, Uganda produces the most sweet potatoes in the world. Nationwide, families grow the crop to feed themselves, their livestock and to use as a source of income. Small scale agricultural operations use a large number of sweet potato varieties in their planting. These varieties are steadily being lost due to weevils, sweet ...

  • CJP Finds Moringa & Flaxseed Couple Oil Crops

    Moringa homeland, India is all set to demonstrate the Genetics Agronomics and Horticulture advancement in moringa cultivation in upcoming GLOBAL MORINGA MEET 2012 from November 25-26, 2012 at Jaipur. With an effort to ‘grow beyond oil ‘, apart from Jatropha, CJP has been engaged in�� development of products that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future ...


    By Advanced Biofuel Center

  • EPA nixes pumping Mississsippi wetlands dry for agriculture

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is threatening to veto a $220 million Army Corps of Engineers flood-control project in the Mississippi Delta known as Yazoo Pump that environmentalists have long opposed for its adverse impact on wildlife and wetlands. The world's largest hydraulic pumping plant would be used to drain wetlands to open the land up to agriculture. In 2000, the EPA concluded ...

  • Major crop losses in Central America due to El Niño

    Prolonged dry weather associated with the El Niño phenomenon has severely reduced this year’s cereal outputs in El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua, putting a large numbers of farmers in need of agricultural assistance as the subregion tries to recover amidst ongoing dryness, FAO said today.  ...

  • Heat and Drought Ravage U.S. Crop Prospects—Global Stocks Suffer

    September estimates from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) show 2012 U.S. corn yields at 123 bushels per acre, down by a fourth from the 2009 high of 165 bushels per acre. Yields are the lowest since 1995 and well below the average of the last 30 years. The summer heat and drought also hit U.S. soybean yields, which are down 20 ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Food producers to benefit from innovative crop irrigation systems

    A four year research project led by Cranfield University aims to improve energy and water efficiency and crop quality through developing an innovative approach to irrigation practices. Rising energy costs, increasing water regulation and supermarket demands for premium quality produce are forcing growers to address the impacts of irrigation on crop quality whilst simultaneously reducing energy ...


    By Cranfield University

  • Why You Should Consider Cover Crops for Your Farm

    The state of soybean planting around the country right now ranges from “finished” to “about to start,” depending on geography and weather. But even if you’re still focused on getting your first soybean seed in the ground, it’s not a bad idea to start thinking about what you’ll plant after harvest. If those plans include cover crops, you might start seeing ...


    By United Soybean Board (USB)

  • Better water management could improve global crop production

    A new global study is the first to quantify the potential of water management strategies to increase crop production. It indicates that a combination of harvesting run-off water and reducing evaporation from soil could increase global crop production by 20 per cent. The EU has recognised the impact of climate change on water and the subsequent effects on agriculture in its white paper on ...

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