crop pathogen News

  • Saving wheat crops worldwide

    In a paper published in the prestigious journal Science, scientists from CSIRO Plant Industry, the University of Zurich and the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center have identified a wheat gene sequence which provides protection against leaf rust, stripe rust and powdery mildew. “Genetic disease resistance is highly desirable in plants as it is more environmentally friendly and ...

  • Soil gives away soybean pathogen’s presence

    New research reveals that soil pH is a useful guide for farmers and agronomists to detect and manage soybean cyst nematode, a devastating soybean pathogen. The investigation uncovered a relationship between high soil pH, which is already outside the ideal growing conditions for soybean, and high populations of cyst nematodes. Scientists from Iowa State University and University of ...

  • Ambrosia beetle spreads dangerous avocado pathogen

    As the laurel wilt pathogen casts a cloud over the $100-million-a-year Florida avocado industry, University of Florida researchers continue to look for clues to prevent the pathogen from spreading. The main culprit has been the redbay ambrosia beetle, which has infected millions of native redbay and swampbay trees with the laurel wilt pathogen, but it is rarely seen in commercial avocado ...


    By University of Florida

  • New method may help detect avocado pathogen earlier

    University of Florida researchers have found an algorithm to help them detect laurel wilt, the deadly pathogen that threatens Florida’s $100 million-a-year avocado industry. Reza Ehsani, an associate professor of agricultural and biological engineering, said the algorithm finds laurel wilt-infected avocado trees before symptoms are visible to the naked eye. About 500 growers produce ...

  • Dealing with difficult powdery mildew infections on ornamental crops

    We are now at the peak of the powdery mildew season and, with increasing temperatures and dry weather conditions, susceptible crops are likely to be at high risk of infection. The pathogen There are five different powdery mildew species which attack ornamental crops in the UK. Erysiphe ssp. – this pathogen is mainly ...


    By Certis UK

  • Crop pests ‘vastly underestimated’ warns study

    The number of different pests plaguing crops in the developing world may be vastly underestimated, contributing to severely reduced harvests in some of the world’s most important food-producing nations, say researchers. About 200 pests and pathogens per country fly under the radar of researchers and policymakers in the developing world due to a lack of technical capacity to detect them, ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • ARS plant collections help safeguard crops

    In the months ahead, Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists plan to collect walnuts from Kyrgyzstan, grasses from Russia, and carrots and sunflowers from fields across the Southeastern United States in efforts that will enhance one of the nation's most effective tools for protecting the food supply. Researchers will make the trips to collect plants with useful ...

  • Using rotation crops to improve soil quality

    Soil quality issues are being researched within two crop rotation experiments that started in 1994 at Narrabri. They compare several crop rotations that include or exclude legume phases. The data presented here relate to the most recent 2-year cycles of these experiments. Following cotton harvest at the end of the previous cycle, rotation crops are sown (winter cereal, faba beans (grain) or vetch ...

  • Keeping tabs on the next generation of transgenic crops

    A team of government and university crop scientists from across Canada has developed a scientific framework for monitoring the release of second-generation genetically modified crops. The framework is designed to assess the risks of novel genes entering wild populations. First-generation genetically modified (GM)/transgenic crops with novel traits have been grown in a number of countries since ...

  • Agrinos To Open State-of-the-Art Microbial Crop Input Production Facility in Oregon

    Agrinos, a leading biological crop input provider committed to improving the productivity and sustainability of agriculture worldwide, announces the construction of a new, state-of-the-art production facility in Clackamas, Oregon. The 28,000 square-foot facility near Portland, Ore., will accommodate increased production capacity for the Agrinos line of proprietary High Yield Technology® ...


    By Agrinos Inc

  • USDA awards more than US$28m in specialty crop research

    Agriculture Secretary Ed Schafer has announced that USDA awarded more than $28 million through the Specialty Crop Research Initiative (SCRI) to solve critical specialty crop agriculture issues, address priorities and solve problems through multifunctional research and extension. The Specialty Crop Research Initiative was established by the 2008 Farm Bill to support the specialty crop industry by ...

  • Resistance genes from wild relatives of crops offer opportunities for more sustainable agriculture worldwidew

    Growing crops with stacks of two or more resistance genes from closely related species, introduced into the crop via for instance genetic engineering, combined with the simultaneous introduction of resistance management, can ensure the long-term resistance of these plants to economically significant and aggressive diseases. The combination offers opportunities to make agriculture more sustainable ...

  • Bayer CropScience acquires European distribution rights for biofungicide Contans from Belchim Crop Protection

    Bayer CropScience announced today that it has acquired the sole European distribution rights for the biological fungicide Contans™ WG from Belchim Crop Protection NV effective October 1, 2014. This acquisition further strengthens Bayer CropScience’s crop protection portfolio and is another step in building up a comprehensive range of biologicals as part of integrated crop solutions. ...


    By Bayer CropScience AG

  • 2012 world food prize recipient among speakers at upcoming meetings of agronomy, crop and soil science societies

    In June, Israeli-American soil scientist Daniel Hillel was named the 2012 recipient of the World Food Prize, the foremost international honor for individuals who have advanced human development by improving the quality, quantity, or availability of food in the world. Now, Hillel—a more than 50-year member of the Soil Science Society of America (SSSA)—is slated to speak at the 2012 ...

  • Wageningen UR Greenhouse Horticulture will test disinfection equipment and substances

    Starting this autumn it is possible to test disinfection equipment for pathogen elimination in soilless cropping methods. It is also possible to test substances or products to eliminate pathogens from the nutrient solution and to clean the piping. The last group can also be tested for remnants which may be able to damage plants. According a strict protocol pathogenic bacteria, fungi or virus will ...

  • UF/IFAS Finding Could Help Farmers Stop Potato, Tomato Disease

    A University of Florida scientist has pinpointed Mexico as the origin of the pathogen that caused the 1840s Irish Potato Famine, a finding that may help researchers solve the $6 billion-a-year disease that continues to evolve and torment potato and tomato growers around the world. A disease called “late blight” killed most of Ireland’s potatoes, while today it costs Florida ...

  • Scientists find new defence front against the Potato Blight

    In this week 'Nature Plants', scientists from Wageningen University, The Netherlands, and The Sainsbury Laboratory in Norwich, UK, report the identification of a resistance gene that enhances resistance against potato late blight from a South American wild relative of cultivated potatoes. The gene targets elicitin, a conserved protein with an important biological function, making it less likely ...

  • New test can detect plant viruses faster, cheaper

    A new test could save time and money diagnosing plant viruses, some of which can destroy millions of dollars in crops each year in Florida, says a University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences researcher. In a newly published study, Jane Polston, a UF/IFAS plant pathology professor, examined several ways to detect the DNA genome of begomoviruses. These viruses have emerged ...

  • Genetics not enough to increase wheat production

    The deep gene pool that has allowed wheat to achieve ever increasing gains in yield may be draining. Crop scientists estimate that 50% of the gain in wheat production over the past century has been due to breeding. According to a new study, however, that improvement has been slowing since the late 1980s, with little chance that future increases in yield can be met by breeding efforts alone. The ...

  • Living mulch, organic fertilizer tested on broccoli

    Cover crops provide many benefits to agricultural production systems, including soil and nutrient retention, resources and habitat for beneficial organisms, and weed suppression. In regions where short growing seasons can hinder the establishment of productive cover crops between cash crop growing periods, living mulch systems may provide vegetable crop growers with opportunities to establish ...

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