crop pest News

  • Coffee pest spreading to other crops in East Africa

    East Africa's horticulture could face a severe crisis due to 'species jump' — whereby a disease moves from a known host to new and unusual ones — affecting fruits, vegetables, and medicinal and ornamental plants. Researchers in Uganda have discovered that the Black Coffee Twig Borer, a devastating coffee pest, has crossed over from Robusta coffee to about 40 plant  ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Crop pests ‘vastly underestimated’ warns study

    The number of different pests plaguing crops in the developing world may be vastly underestimated, contributing to severely reduced harvests in some of the world’s most important food-producing nations, say researchers. About 200 pests and pathogens per country fly under the radar of researchers and policymakers in the developing world due to a lack of technical capacity to detect them, ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Growers get pest smart with Veg Pest ID

    Picking a mould from a mildew is now easier for vegetable growers, thanks to the latest range of pest and disease identification updates on the vegetable levy-funded smart device application, Veg Pest ID. The app, released last year by Applied Horticultural Research, has been updated to include 13 vegetable varieties and more than 1,500 high resolution images of a wide range of pests, ...


    By AUSVEG

  • Neonicotinoids: may reduce crop yields by poisoning insects that eat slug pests

    Beetles that are helpful to farmers can be poisoned if they feed on slugs that have eaten crops treated with neonicotinoids, a new study reports. The slugs themselves are not harmed by neonicotinoids. In American field trials, researchers found that plots planted with neonicotinoid-treated soybeans contained more slugs, fewer beetle predators and had 5% lower yields. The insecticide may be ...

  • Remote pest managment with automated traps

    A decade spent developing pheromones for pest management underscored the importance of these chemicals for Michael Gilbert, president and CEO of British Columbia’s SemiosBio Technologies Inc. But at a cost of up to $5,000 a kilogram, pheromones are also one of the costliest pest control products on the market, making targeted deployment key to cost-effectiveness. Ideally, growers would ...


    By Semios

  • Warming could change SA’s weed pests

    The report; Climate Change and Invasive Plants in South Australia, used climate projections to 2080 to examine how weeds may shift in range across the State. Detailed profiles are provided for 13 weed species, including options for managing them under climate change. Lead-author, Dr Darren Kriticos from CSIRO’s Climate Adaptation Flagship, said projections of future climate scenarios ...

  • Four in one – new discovery on pest fruit flies

    Four of the world's most destructive agricultural pests are actually one and the same fruit fly, according to the results of a global research effort released today. The discovery should lead to the easing of certain international trade restrictions and also aid efforts to combat the ability of these harmful insects to reproduce, experts said. The so-called Oriental, Philippine, Invasive and ...

  • Pest-free plant material thanks to CATT method

    A treatment with warm air rich in CO2 and low in oxygen helps clear plants of nematodes, thrips, mosquito larvae and other pests. “It prevents the uncertainty and resistance issues that come with the use of chemical pest control products,” says research manager Piet Spoorenberg of Wageningen UR. Export in particular faces major risks such as when thrips are found in a batch of ...

  • New partnership grants demonstrate integrated pest management

    Grants totaling nearly US$1 million have been awarded for projects that use Integrated Pest Management (IPM) approaches to reduce pesticide risk. The grants will support the demonstration of innovative IPM practices, technologies, outreach and education. IPM is an effective and environmentally sensitive approach to pest management that relies on a combination of common-sense practices. In ...

  • Pest ants help to improve Indonesian cocoa yields

    Native ants living in cacao trees in Indonesia that are often seen as pests in fact seem to boost their yields, a study suggests. Scientists from Germany, Indonesia and Sweden studying how ant communities affect cocoa yields in Sulawesi found that trees with abundant native ants (Dolichoderus sp.) produced the best yields. In contrast, the yields of cacao trees where ants were excluded were 27 ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Impacts of tillage on soil and crops

    The increasing popularity of reduced tillage on crops has not only been an important development in combating soil erosion, but it has also been associated with increasing organic material and producing high crop yields. For peanut crops, however, reduced tillage has not gained a large acceptance as a viable practice, as findings of inconsistent yields have not encouraged farmers to make a switch ...


    By American Society of Agronomy

  • Cultivating crops on city rooftops

    To meet the challenges of producing food in a more environmentally-friendly way, the European Environment Agency (EEA) has called on cities to develop 'living walls' of edible plants. Through vertical farming, agriculture could become a feature of urban life, lowering energy consumption, carbon emissions and resource use in food production. By shortening the distance produce has to travel from ...


    By GLOBE Foundation

  • Combating pest insects in the soil with root-colonizing insecticidal fungi

    The biological control of pest insects in the soil has come one step closer. Wageningen UR has isolated five promising fungi that kill 90 to 100 per cent of the grubs and crane fly larvae, and which also survive well in the soil when there are no pest insects present. It is expected that these insecticidal fungi will also be effective against other pest insects in the soil. Surviving ...

  • Sterile pest could do away with Bt cotton in Arizona

    Farmers in Arizona, United States, have all but eradicated a major pest from their land using a combination of genetically modified cotton and billions of sterilised versions of the pest's parent moth. The farmers had been growing Btcotton for several years. The cotton is genetically engineered to produce Bt toxin, which kills pink bollworm, a serious cotton pest. Bt cotton had reduced the pest ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • For Soybean Insect-Pest Management, There’s No Substitute for Scouting a Field, Says Researcher

    The weather in the Mid-South region causes intense pest pressure for row-crop farmers. To maintain yields, farmers in this area must treat numerous insect pests, more so than farmers in other areas of the country, according to Mississippi Extension entomologist Angus Catchot, Ph.D. In a new Focus on Soybean webcast, Catchot outlines  ...


    By United Soybean Board (USB)

  • Revolutionary pest surveillance method to be launched at the 2015 National Horticulture Convention

    A revolutionary new pest surveillance system that will help growers monitor insect populations will be on show at the 2015 National Horticulture Convention, Trade Show and Awards for Excellence.    The Trapview Smart Trap System utilises innovative technology in a fully integrated system to provide a simplified solution for growers, agronomists and researchers ...


    By AUSVEG

  • Massachusetts urges parents to ask schools about integrated pest management plans

    As the new school year approaches, the Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources (DAR) is urging parents to ask whether their child’s school or daycare facility it has a current School Integrated Pest Management (IPM) plan for safe pesticide use. “At home and in the classroom, parents are the first line of defense in protecting their children against pesticide exposure,” said DAR ...

  • Horticulture in Egypt one step closer to IPM (Integrated Pest Management)

    Egypt is an important exporter of horticultural crops such as green beans, sweet pepper, tomatoes, strawberries and cucumbers. Markets are increasingly demanding concerning the residues of plant protection products (PPP’s). Import of horticultural products is regularly rejected because of high residue levels. To reduce this risk it is necessary that Egyptian growers apply less pesticides ...

  • Keeping plant pests and diseases at bay: experts focus on global measures

    How to prevent insects, bacteria, viruses and weeds from infesting fruit, vegetable and other plant and food consignments and then spreading across the world is the focus of a four-day gathering of international experts which began at FAO today. The annual meeting of the Commission on Phytosanitary Measures (CPM), the ...

  • Reality check for `miracle` biofuel crop

    The hardy jatropha tree as a biofuel source may not be the panacea for smallholders that some have claimed, say Miyuki Iiyama and James Onchieku. It sounds too good to be true: a biofuel crop that grows on semi-arid lands and degraded soils, replaces fossil fuels in developing countries and brings huge injections of cash to poor smallholders. That is what some are claiming for Jatropha curcas, ...


    By SciDev.Net

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