crop ph requirement News

  • Soil gives away soybean pathogen’s presence

    New research reveals that soil pH is a useful guide for farmers and agronomists to detect and manage soybean cyst nematode, a devastating soybean pathogen. The investigation uncovered a relationship between high soil pH, which is already outside the ideal growing conditions for soybean, and high populations of cyst nematodes. Scientists from Iowa State University and University of ...

  • Australian Growers directed to certified laboratories

    Grain growers are encouraged to make sure that the soil testing laboratory they use in coming months is certified to conduct the test they require. This is one of the messages contained in a new Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC) fact sheet Better Fertiliser Decisions for Crop Nutrition. Department of Agriculture and Food (DAFWA) researcher Ross Brennan said soil ...

  • New tests confirm efficiency of Hortipray® micronutri Fe as an alternative to chelates

    Following initial successful tests of Prayon’s Hortipray® micronutri Fe on cucumbers, new experiments carried out on tomatoes and strawberries at the Hoogstraten Research Centre (Belgium) have confirmed the product efficiency in enhancing iron uptake by the plant in substrate grown crops. This new fertiliser is a combination of iron and specialty phosphate developed and patented by ...


    By Prayon Group

  • Household compost as good for soil as conventional fertilisers, say EU researchers

    Since 2005, conventional disposal of organic waste has been prohibited in Sweden. Instead, this waste is incinerated or separated at source, processed (composted or anaerobically digested) and recycled as fertiliser on crop land. A new study has investigated the use of organic waste from different sources as a fertiliser and found that residue from biogas production is an effective fertiliser. ...

  • USSEC Provides Trade and Technical Servicing to Shrimp Producers in Peru

    USSEC provided technical support to commercial shrimp growers in Peru by holding multiple discussions with a feedmill representative and fish and shrimp producers about modifying diet formulations for fish and shrimp by incorporating more soybean meal derived from U.S.-grown soybeans. Visits to fish and shrimp farms and facilities by USSEC consultants Dr. John Hargreaves and Jairo Amezquita ...

  • Iron deficiency in soil threatens soybean production

    An expansion of soybean production into areas where soybean has seldom, if ever, been grown can be problematic for some farmers. Soils having high pH values and large amounts of calcium and/or magnesium carbonate are notoriously iron deficient. Iron deficient soils in the North Central United States are estimated to reduce soy bean production by 12.5 million bushels every year. John Wiersma, a ...

  • CleanGrow introduces first-in-kind multi-ion CNT-based sensor for horticultural and other applications

    This week at Horti Fair in The Netherlands, the horticulture industry's premier tradeshow, CleanGrow will introduce its breakthrough multi-ion measurement solution capable of analyzing up to six ions simultaneously. The product combines a carbon nanotube-based sensor with a multi-ion meter for on-site measurements and real-time feedback. Currently optimized for horticultural applications, the ...


    By CleanGrow

  • GWT Series Natural Zeolite Media Agricultural Applications

    Zeolite based fertilizers are known to be "smart fertilizers" due to the high cation exchange capacity (CEC) and porous crystalline structure. Zeolite is the only negatively-charged mineral in existence in the world, for these purposes it has therefore has significant uses across a wide range of applications and in particular in Agriculture applications. Zeolite has a known ability to act as a ...

  • Climate impact on agriculture could lead to calamity

    New research predicts that climate change will transform agriculture, with a drop in yields of up to 18% by 2050 in terms of calories harvested. By then, the global population will have risen by more than 18%, so the consequences could be calamitous. That’s the worst projected outcome. By the same date, the researchers say, yields in terms of calories could have risen by 3%, but that would ...


    By Climate News Network

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