crop quality News

  • Semios Receives EPA Approval to Combat Difficult Citrus Pest

    Semios is pleased to announce it has received Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and California Department of Pest Regulation (DPR)  approval for CRS Plus, an aerosol pheromone biopesticide product that disrupts the mating of Aonidiella aurantii, also known as California Red Scale (CRS). CRS attacks all aerial parts of citrus trees including twigs, leaves, branches, and, most importantly, ...


    By Semios

  • Bee pollination improves crop quality as well as quantity

    Bee pollination improves the shape, weight and shelf-life of strawberries, contributing a staggering €1.05 billion to the European strawberry market per year, new research suggests. By blocking bees from a set of plants, the researchers demonstrated the substantial effects of bee pollination on the quality of the fruit. It is well established that insect pollination increases the quantity of ...

  • Using rotation crops to improve soil quality

    Soil quality issues are being researched within two crop rotation experiments that started in 1994 at Narrabri. They compare several crop rotations that include or exclude legume phases. The data presented here relate to the most recent 2-year cycles of these experiments. Following cotton harvest at the end of the previous cycle, rotation crops are sown (winter cereal, faba beans (grain) or vetch ...

  • National Collegiate Crops Contest

    The National Crops Judging Contest consists of three parts: plant and seed identification, commercial grain grading, and seed analysis. The Kansas City and Chicago contests represent the national finals of collegiate crops competition for the year. Preparation for crops contests teaches evaluation of crops for quality relative to certification, viability and marketing. Students learn in great ...

  • The future of cover crops

    Winter cover crops are an important component of nutrient cycling, soil cover and organic matter content. Although its benefits are well documented, cover crop use in farming systems is relatively low. Research has shown that time and money are the two primary reasons why farmers are hesitant to adopt the technique. Developing innovative and cost-effective crop cover systems could increase the ...

  • Cultivating crops on city rooftops

    To meet the challenges of producing food in a more environmentally-friendly way, the European Environment Agency (EEA) has called on cities to develop 'living walls' of edible plants. Through vertical farming, agriculture could become a feature of urban life, lowering energy consumption, carbon emissions and resource use in food production. By shortening the distance produce has to travel from ...


    By GLOBE Foundation

  • Crop water use efficiency

    Crop water use efficiency (WUE), or yield per unit of water used, can be improved through irrigation management and methods, including deficit irrigation (irrigating less than is required for maximum yields) and supplemental irrigation (irrigating to supplement precipitation so as to avoid crop failure or severe yield decline). Thus, WUE is key for agricultural production with limited water ...

  • Manure Event to Show New Ways to Boost Both Crops and Water Quality

    Manure has two shades of green, so to speak. The green of greater farm crop yields. And the green of a cleaner environment. Organizers of the Aug. 14 Manure Science Review say farmers can see both at the same time and that the event will show how to do it. “Manure is an excellent product for improving soil ...


    By Ohio State University

  • Cover Crops Capture Nutrients to the Benefit of Farmers and Water Quality

    Many factors contribute to the excess phosphorous that stimulates algal systems in bodies of water such as Lake Erie. Sources of excess phosphorous include urban stormwater, factories, sewers, household wastes and lawn fertilizer, and in some areas runoff from fertilizers or manure applied to fields. Fortunately, many farmers are already doing their part to improve water. ...

  • New tool calculates impact of bioenergy crops on soil quality

    Today Alterra and CLM, supported by Netherlands Enterprise Agency, jointly launched the tool BioESoil that allows farmers and advisors to assess the impacts of bioenergy production on soil quality. With a worldwide rising demand for biomass, uncontrolled production may cause a serious deterioration of soil quality. However, so far no methodology existed to assess the impact of biomass production ...

  • Growing crops in the city

    A case study published in the 2010 Journal of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Education by professors at Washington State University studies the challenges one organization faced in maintaining an urban market garden. The journal is published by the American Society of Agronomy. Since 1995, Seattle Youth Garden Works (SYGW) has employed young homeless individuals or those involved in the ...

  • Yield projections for Switchgrass as a Biofuel Crop

    While scientists have conducted numerous studies on production of biomass from biofuel crops, such as switchgrass, no one has yet compiled this information to evaluate the response of biomass yield to soils, climate, and crop management across the United States. A team of researchers from Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Dartmouth College published just such a study in the July-August 2010 ...

  • Cover Crops Add to Farm Sustainability

    A potentially record-setting U.S. corn harvest is underway. Many farmers can attribute the use of cover crops as one of multiple best management practices (BMPs) that help them increase yield year after year. Combined with BMPs of The Fertilizer Institute’s 4R Nutrient Stewardship program that promotes the application of nutrients at the right source, right rate, right time and right place, ...

  • Can GM crops feed the hungry?

    Golden Rice burst into the public imagination a decade ago, in the form of a cover article in Time magazine that claimed the genetically modified (GM) rice could 'save a million kids a year'. The rice gets its golden hue from an excess of beta carotene, a precursor to vitamin A that could help half a million children who go blind each year from an often-fatal vitamin A deficiency. But ten years ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Cover crops reduce erosion, runoff

    Cover crops may be more effective at reducing soil erosion and runoff after maize harvest than rough tillage, according to scientists from the Université Catholique de Louvain, in collaboration with the Independent Center for the Promotion of Forage (CIPF). The three-year study, supervised by Charles Bielders and conducted by Eric Laloy, measured erosion and runoff losses from silt loam ...

  • Assessing stressed crops from the sky

    In Peru, the International Potato Center (CIP), Lima, uses drones to aerially assess crop performance under different stresses, such as pests, diseases, drought and frost — all of them widespread phenomena in the Andes, one ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Biodiesel Crop of the Week: Pongamia Pinnata

    Pongamia is an ancient tree that is native to India. It is frost tolerant, but not freeze-proof. It is also happens to be a legume, which is at the heart of what makes the business model so interesting. The tree yields a generous annual nut crop that is harvested with conventional shakers, such as those used by almond and other nut growers. That seed has approximately a 40 percent oil content ...


    By Advanced Biofuel Center

  • Reality check for `miracle` biofuel crop

    The hardy jatropha tree as a biofuel source may not be the panacea for smallholders that some have claimed, say Miyuki Iiyama and James Onchieku. It sounds too good to be true: a biofuel crop that grows on semi-arid lands and degraded soils, replaces fossil fuels in developing countries and brings huge injections of cash to poor smallholders. That is what some are claiming for Jatropha curcas, ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Overcoming obstacles to GM crop adoption

    This policy brief, published by the UK's Parliamentary Office of Science and Technology (POST), examines the potential benefits and challenges of using genetically modified (GM) crops for agricultural development in the developing world, and highlights ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Squeezing more crop out of each drop of water

    Studies in China and Colorado by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists and cooperators have revealed some interesting tactics on how to irrigate with limited water, based on a crop’s critical growth stages. Laj Ahuja, research leader at the ARS Agricultural Systems Research Unit in Fort Collins, Colo., and colleagues conducted the studies. As one example, with wheat in China, they found ...

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