crop turn News

  • World premiere for Grain Cloud

    At the Agritechnica exhibition in Hanover on November 12, the app Grain Cloud is presented as Skandia Elevator’s first software. It facilitates harvesting and storage as it provides a complete overview of all units and processes at the grain plant. The app collects information from the plant’s control system and shows, among other things, the transport systems and machines that are ...


    By Skandia Elevator

  • Motorizing Sudanese crop irrigation

    The parched landscape of Sudan, on the southern edge of the Sahara desert, is among the world's driest regions, with a nine-month dry season and a highly unreliable rainy season. Large-scale farmers there manage to grow about half of the impoverished nation's food production with the help of motorized irrigation pumps, but for individual subsistence farmers and their families--about two-thirds of ...

  • Cultivating crops on city rooftops

    To meet the challenges of producing food in a more environmentally-friendly way, the European Environment Agency (EEA) has called on cities to develop 'living walls' of edible plants. Through vertical farming, agriculture could become a feature of urban life, lowering energy consumption, carbon emissions and resource use in food production. By shortening the distance produce has to travel from ...


    By GLOBE Foundation

  • Saltwater solution to save crops

    Technology under development at the University of New South Wales could offer new hope to farmers in drought-affected and marginal areas by enabling crops to grow using salty groundwater. Associate Professor Greg Leslie, a chemical engineer at UNSW's UNESCO Centre for Membrane Science and Technology, is working with the University of Sydney on technology which uses reverse-osmosis membranes to ...

  • Breakthrough in quest to turn seaweed into biofuels

    Brown seaweed's potential as a vast source of biofuels has been highlighted with the announcement that scientists have found a way of converting all its major sugars into ethanol. A team reported in Science today (19 January) that it has engineered a microbe that will convert the sugars to ethanol, overturning ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Biodiesel Crop of the Week: Pongamia Pinnata

    Pongamia is an ancient tree that is native to India. It is frost tolerant, but not freeze-proof. It is also happens to be a legume, which is at the heart of what makes the business model so interesting. The tree yields a generous annual nut crop that is harvested with conventional shakers, such as those used by almond and other nut growers. That seed has approximately a 40 percent oil content ...


    By Advanced Biofuel Center

  • Specialty Crop Tractor Coming Soon

    Spirit of Innovation at LEE Historically, our goal at LEE is to produce innovative tractors to address numerous crop production issues like escape weeds, variety improvements, and ...


    By LeeAgra, Inc.

  • Urbanization, export crops drive deforestation

    The drivers of tropical deforestation have shifted in the early 21st century to hinge on growth of cities and the globalized agricultural trade, a new large-scale study concludes. The observations starkly reverse assumptions by some scientists that fast-growing urbanization and the efficiencies of global trade might eventually slow or ...

  • Can GM crops feed the hungry?

    Golden Rice burst into the public imagination a decade ago, in the form of a cover article in Time magazine that claimed the genetically modified (GM) rice could 'save a million kids a year'. The rice gets its golden hue from an excess of beta carotene, a precursor to vitamin A that could help half a million children who go blind each year from an often-fatal vitamin A deficiency. But ten years ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Crops and soil threatened by floods in the Midwest

    Here, in some of the best soil in the world, the stunted stalks of Dave Timmerman's newly planted corn are wilting in what sometimes look more like rice paddies than the plains, the sunshine glinting off of pools of collected water. Although time is running out, he has yet to plant all of his soybean crop because the waterlogged soil cannot support his footsteps, much less heavy machinery. Mr. ...

  • Rising CO2 robs crops of protein

    New analysis suggests that rising CO2 levels will affect the protein content of major food crops, and indeed this may already be taking place. Experts suggest this change in the composition of the foods we eat could have consequences for human nutrition. Farmers can limit these effects by using more nitrogen-based fertilisers, but these in turn have a high environmental cost. Research ...

  • Drought in Haiti ravages crops for farmers

    Jean-Romain Beltinor plunged a hoe into the rocky dirt on his parched hillside to prepare for planting seeds he does not have. After months of drought in northwest Haiti, the subsistence farmer struggles to find food for his 13 children. To earn a little money, he must turn to work that only makes things worse, cutting what little wood remains for charcoal. "The rain isn't falling. I can't feed ...


    By Associated Press

  • Why I turned from GM opponent to advocate

    Just under 20 years ago, when the issue of GMOs was first hitting the news, I was a dedicated anti-biotech activist. I believed that genetic modification was a dangerous technology that would harm the ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Pesticide can turn male frogs into females

    Atrazine, a herbicide used globally but banned in the EU, can cause chemical castration and complete feminisation in adult male frogs, according to a recent study. The researchers suggest atrazine could contribute to the global decline of amphibians. Atrazine is one of the world's most commonly used herbicides. It is typically used to control weeds in agriculture, such as in the production of ...

  • Bacteria may affordably turn plants into diesel by 2012

    Bacteria that convert plants into diesel could become a widely available method for creating alternative fuels at commercial prices within the next two years. U.S. researchers announced progress last week in converting sugars directly into biodiesel by modifying the Escherichia coli bacterium (E. coli). Biodiesel, a fossil fuel alternative, can be transported in diesel pipelines and burned in ...


    By Worldwatch Institute

  • Common vision urged to turn policy into action on malnutrition

    Experts and country representatives meeting at FAO headquarters said both international political momentum and practical solutions tailored to specific countries were needed to tackle the nutrition-related problems that plague more than half of the world's population. "A common vision is important to ensure and enhance international cooperation and solidarity around nutrition issues, and to ...

  • Nepal`s shifting rains and changing crops

    With weather becoming more erratic every year as a result of climate change, Nepali farmers are progressively shifting their approach, turning vast areas of rice paddies into small-scale vegetable farming. Vegetables are more resilient as they can be ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Soil organisms aid crop productivity by increasing yields

    Soil-living bacteria and fungi can be used to boost crop yields by more than 50 per cent without the use of fertilizers, an international research project has found. In combination with fertilizers, yields of key crops such as beans, can more than double, the scientists from seven countries discovered. The findings, the result of an international effort to unravel the mysteries of so-called ...

  • Bee pollination improves crop quality as well as quantity

    Bee pollination improves the shape, weight and shelf-life of strawberries, contributing a staggering €1.05 billion to the European strawberry market per year, new research suggests. By blocking bees from a set of plants, the researchers demonstrated the substantial effects of bee pollination on the quality of the fruit. It is well established that insect pollination increases the quantity of ...

  • Cassava`s huge potential as 21st Century crop

    Save and Grow, an environmentally-friendly farming model promoted by FAO, can sustainably increase cassava yields by up to 400 percent and help turn this staple from a poor people's food into a 21st Century crop, FAO said today. In a newly-published field guide detailing Save and Grow's applications to cassava smallholder production, FAO noted that global cassava output has increased by 60 ...

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