edible insect News

  • Edible insects inch one step closer

    Farming insects on a large scale is no more of a biological or chemical hazard than other livestock farming, says a report by a European food safety body. The report, which looks at the potential of insects as food or animal feed, says the microbiological, chemical and ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Insect farming aims to end food insecurity in Laos

    What is the best way to raise and cook crickets, mealworms, palm weevils and weaver ants? A research and demonstration site in Laos aims to find out, as part of a push to provide food security in the country. Laotian farmers will be taught how to rear and process the insects, in the hope of turning a food source that is largely foraged into one that is farmed instead. Food insecurity is ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • ARS scientists develop self-pollinating almond trees

    Self-pollinating almond trees that can produce a bountiful harvest without insect pollination are being developed by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists. This is good news for almond growers who face rising costs for insect pollination because of nationwide shortages of honey bees due to Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) and other factors. ARS geneticist Craig Ledbetter, at the agency’s ...

  • EPA Approves a Dry Formulation of Marrone Bio Innovations` Grandevo Biopesticide

    Marrone Bio Innovations Inc. (MBI), a leading global provider of natural pest management products for the agricultural and water treatment markets, announced today that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has approved a new, dry formulation of  Grandevo™, the ...

  • Marrone Bio Innovations Receives Florida State Registration for Dry Formulation of Grandevo™ Bioinsecticide

      DAVIS, Calif., June 28, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- Marrone Bio Innovations, Inc. (MBI), a leading global provider of natural pest management products for the agricultural and water treatment markets, announced today that a new dry formulation of Grandevo™ has been registered by the Florida Department of ...

  • Hudson Valley organic farm produces seeds largely by hand

    Drying corn stalks wilt in late summer sun as Ken Greene tours his crops. Calendula flowers are past bloom and brown. Melon leaves lay crinkled by the dirt. Plants have, literally, gone to seed. A perfect picture for an organic seed harvest. "It looks like hell now, but it's actually good for the seeds," said Greene, co-founder of the Hudson Valley Seed Library. The small business 70 miles ...


    By Associated Press

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