evapotranspiration monitoring News

  • Taking earth`s temperature via satellite

    Imagine adding a thermometer to Google Earth. That's the vision of Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists Martha Anderson and Bill Kustas, who see the need for high-resolution thermal infrared imaging tools--such as those aboard the aging Landsat satellites--as vital to monitoring earth's health. These thermal data are especially important given the combination of global warming and the ...

  • Screening soil moisture conditions reveals an increased risk of drought in a Swedish drainage basin

    The risk of drought in the Norrström drainage basin, Sweden, increased during the 20th century, a new study has found. As the frequency of the dry periods increased, less water was available in the landscape for agriculture and for the resupply of groundwater — despite an increase in precipitation in the area over the same period. The researchers reached this conclusion after screening ...

  • Australia chosen as first country to launch Manna Irrigation Intelligence

    Australia has been strategically chosen to be the first country to release Manna Irrigation Intelligence solution (a subsidiary of Rivulis), a revolutionary sensor-free software system designed to assist growers make better irrigation decisions. Using advanced satellite imaging technology, combined with real-time hyper-local weather, Manna Irrigation Intelligence ...


    By Rivulis Irrigation

  • New satellite sensing tool for improving agricultural land use observation

    FAO (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations) data indicate that annually 2500 km3 of freshwater are used for agricultural production, which amounts to 70% of the water resources the whole of humanity consumes in a year. With the global population continuing to grow at a high pace, it is essential to optimize the use of water resources and to increase agricultural production in ...

  • How green was my vertical farm?

    By 2050, 80% of the earth’s population will live in cities and 3 billion more people will need to be fed. The simple fact is we are running out of available land to grow enough food to feed them. If we can’t grow our cities outward to find more arable land, the only solution is to grow them upwards. This may change the way we design cities forever. The problem is real and ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

Need help finding the right suppliers? Try XPRT Sourcing. Let the XPRTs do the work for you