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  • Plastic debris in the Danube outnumbers fish larvae

    Plastic debris in the Danube outnumbers fish larvae Pieces of plastic litter outnumber fish larvae in the Austrian Danube River, new research has found. This is worrying, as some fish are likely to mistake the plastic for the prey they would normally feed on. This litter may also contribute to marine pollution; the researchers estimated that at least 4.2 tonnes of plastic debris enter the Black ...

  • Combating pest insects in the soil with root-colonizing insecticidal fungi

    The biological control of pest insects in the soil has come one step closer. Wageningen UR has isolated five promising fungi that kill 90 to 100 per cent of the grubs and crane fly larvae, and which also survive well in the soil when there are no pest insects present. It is expected that these insecticidal fungi will also be effective against other pest insects in the soil. Surviving ...

  • Insect-eating bats save global maize farmers €0.91 billion a year from crop damage

    Insect-eating bats are estimated to be worth US$ 1 billion (€0.91 billion) a year to maize farmers around the world, a new study has revealed. Not only do bats reduce crop damage by eating adult corn earworm crop pests, they also suppress fungal infections in maize ears. Bats and their habitats need to be better protected for their ecological and economic contributions, say the study’s ...

  • EnvironFlight LLC wins the ‘DSM Innovation Award in Aquaculture’ at AquaVision 2016

    AquaVision and DSM Nutritional Products (DSM) are delighted to announce EnviroFlight LLCis the winner of the ‘DSM Innovation Award in Aquaculture’ at AquaVision 2016.  The ‘DSM Innovation Award in Aquaculture’ was created to reflect DSM’s unique history and dedication to provide industry leading micronutrient innovations in aquaculture worldwide as well as the ...


    By Skretting - Nutreco Group

  • Cooler Weather Conditions, Late Planting, Impacts Insects on Crops

    Rainy, cooler weather experienced recently throughout the region means slugs may be on the rise in some field crops, says an entomologist with the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. The rains combined with colder temperatures are ideal slug weather, said Kelley Tilmon, a field crop entomologist with Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio ...


    By Ohio State University

  • Jellyfish infestations caused by human activities

    A huge rise in jellyfish populations around the world appears to be caused by human activities, according to recent research. Early action is essential to prevent marine ecosystems from changing to unhealthy states that favour destructive jellyfish blooms. Although large numbers of jellyfish can occur in healthy marine ecosystems, destructive jellyfish blooms are being observed more frequently in ...

  • Sting operation - jellyfish `blooms` may endanger fish stocks

    Surges in jellyfish populations may be one reason for a drop in fish stocks observed in the Mediterranean and Black Sea, according to a new report published by FAO. Overfishing, which removes top predators from the sea, is one of the factors behind jellyfish "blooms", or suddenly increased numbers. A "vicious circle" can then follow in which large numbers of medusae feed on fish larvae and ...

  • Northern fish stocks in good shape

    FISH stocks in the North Sea and Barents Sea, two of the most important northern hemisphere fishing areas, are in good shape, according to the latest assessment by marine scientists. But there is evidence that the seas in those areas are becoming warmer. The Norwegian Institute of Marine Research has been studying the state of several different types of fish. It has found that in the North ...


    By FISHupdate

  • The impact of pesticides on freshwater creatures

    A recent study has concluded that, although spray drift of pesticides can have short-term effects on individual stream-dwelling invertebrates, there is no evidence to suggest that there is an impact on populations as a whole. However, to reduce the impact of the pesticides on these organisms, a no-spray buffer zone is shown to be a simple and effective measure. Pesticides play an important role ...

  • For Soybean Insect-Pest Management, There’s No Substitute for Scouting a Field, Says Researcher

    The weather in the Mid-South region causes intense pest pressure for row-crop farmers. To maintain yields, farmers in this area must treat numerous insect pests, more so than farmers in other areas of the country, according to Mississippi Extension entomologist Angus Catchot, Ph.D. In a new Focus on Soybean webcast, Catchot outlines  ...


    By United Soybean Board (USB)

  • Can new biopesticide protect crops without harming honeybees?

    A potential new biopesticide, made of spider venom and snowdrop proteins, kills agricultural pests but shows minimal toxicity to honeybees, new research suggests. Learning and memory of honeybees exposed to the biopesticide were not affected, even at doses higher than they would normally encounter in the environment. Insect pollination is vital for food production; however, there are concerns ...

  • Health of European streams revealed by leaf breakdown

    A recent study, which assessed 100 streams across Europe, reveals that a key ecosystem process, leaf litter breakdown, is slowed when nutrient concentrations in the water are either very low or very high, has the highest potential at moderate nutrient concentrations and is inhibited in heavily polluted waters, implying that the relationship between nutrient levels and ...

  • Transgenic Corn Found to Damage Stream Ecosystems

    BLOOMINGTON, Indiana, October 11, 2007 (ENS) - A widely planted variety of genetically engineered corn has the potential to harm aquatic ecosystems, finds a new study by an Indiana University professor of environmental science and his colleagues. Pollen and other plant parts containing toxins from genetically engineered Bt corn are washing into streams near cornfields and harming a ...

  • Alien invaders threaten world Heritage Site

    Alien wildlife species are multiplying around Europe's Wadden Sea, posing a serious threat to biodiversity. The warning came in a new report launched on Wadden Sea Day - a platform for recent research on the marine World Heritage Site that borders the Netherlands, Germany and Denmark. As well as reducing biodiversity, the abundant alien species could also prove an economic burden to the Wadden ...

  • Keeping plant pests and diseases at bay: experts focus on global measures

    How to prevent insects, bacteria, viruses and weeds from infesting fruit, vegetable and other plant and food consignments and then spreading across the world is the focus of a four-day gathering of international experts which began at FAO today. The annual meeting of the Commission on Phytosanitary Measures (CPM), the ...

  • New insecticide Sivanto registered in the USA

    Bayer CropScience has received the registration for its new insecticide Sivanto™ from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Sivanto™, which was developed to control devastating sucking pests on fruits and vegetables as well as most broadacre crops, will be available for the 2015 growing season. Further registrations for Sivanto™ prime are ...


    By Bayer CropScience AG

  • Semios Receives Canadian Regulatory Approval for Aerosol Pheromones in Agriculture

    Semios, provider of real-time agricultural information and precision pest management tools, has been given approval by Health Canada, Pest Management Regulatory Authority for their Semios OFM Plus pheromone product that disrupts the mating of oriental fruit moth. “We have already had great success rates with this product in the US and Europe, so we are especially pleased to have the ...


    By SemiosBio Technologies Inc.

  • Ecosystem-based farming comes of age

    A new FAO book out today takes a close look at how the world's major cereals maize, rice and wheat - which together account for an estimated 42.5 percent of human calories and 37 percent of our protein - can be grown in ways that respect and even leverage natural ecosystems. Drawing on case studies from around the planet, the ...

  • NRDC and Berkeley Food Institute Announce Winners of the 2014 Growing Green Awards

    Today, the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) and the Berkeley Food Institute (BFI) celebrate four remarkable leaders who are advancing sustainable food and agriculture at the sixth annual Growing Green Awards. Chosen from hundreds of nominations submitted across the country by a renowned panel of judges, the 2014 ...

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