field crop research News

  • Muck Crops Field Day is July 31

    Agricultural producers are welcome to attend the Muck Crops Field Day and learn the newest vegetable care and growing tips from state experts at Ohio’s oldest outlying agricultural research station. The 2014 Muck Crops Field Day is July 31 at the Muck Crops Agricultural Research Station, located in Willard. This event is sponsored by the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center ...


    By Ohio State University

  • Ceres Showcases Energy Crop Advances at Field Day

    Energy crop company Ceres, Inc. (Nasdaq: CERE) today hosted a bioenergy field day at the company’s 200-acre research center near Houston, Texas. The outdoor event, which draws industry representatives, policymakers and investors, highlighted innovations in the company’s development pipeline that are expected to increase yields and enable greater use of ...


    By Ceres

  • Weather Fluctuations Impact Soybeans Less Than Other Field Crops

    From freezing temperatures and snow flurries to sunny, 80-degree days in a span of a week — if this type of strange weather continues, growers across Ohio want to know, will this have a negative impact on soybean crops? Not really, according to a field crops expert in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University.   Laura Lindsey, a soybean ...


    By Ohio State University

  • First quinoa crop harvested

    Wageningen UR researchers have developed three quinoa varieties suitable for cultivation in Europe. These new varieties were planted alongside each other on three Wageningen UR test fields last April. The earliest-ripening variety was harvested yesterday in Lelystad; the remaining two crops will be harvested from the other test fields in late August. The initial yields look quite promising. ...

  • Floods wash away Pakistan`s crop research efforts

    The recent Pakistan floods have caused substantial damage to the country's crop research, washing away new seed varieties and test crops planted in the fields, and damaging buildings and equipment, leaving the country's research institutes in disrepair. So far, the floods have killed more than 2,000 people and affected a further 21 million, killed 200,000 livestock and destroyed 4.25 million ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Cereal Crops Feeling the Heat

    LIVERMORE, California (ENS) - Warming temperatures since 1981 have caused annual losses of about US$5 billion for six major cereal crops, new research has found. This is the first study to estimate how much global food production already has been affected by climate change. From 1981 to 2002, fields of wheat, corn and barley throughout the world have produced a combined 40 million ...

  • New research reveals challenges in genetically engineered crop regulatory process

    Experts are available for interviews on this topic! A new innovation can completely reshape an industry-- inspiring both optimism and debate.  The development of genetically engineered (GE) crops in the 1980's ignited a buzz in the agricultural community with the potential for higher crop yields and better nutritional content, along with the reduction of herbicide and pesticide ...

  • For Soybean Insect-Pest Management, There’s No Substitute for Scouting a Field, Says Researcher

    The weather in the Mid-South region causes intense pest pressure for row-crop farmers. To maintain yields, farmers in this area must treat numerous insect pests, more so than farmers in other areas of the country, according to Mississippi Extension entomologist Angus Catchot, Ph.D. In a new Focus on Soybean webcast, Catchot outlines  ...


    By United Soybean Board (USB)

  • Expert to Field Questions on Crop Budgets, Farmland Prices and Rental Rates at the 2014 Farm Science Review

    While cropland values in Ohio increased in the past two years, they have remained flat, and in some cases declined depending on the land class, in 2014, an economist from Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences said. Barry Ward, production business management leader for Ohio State University Extension, will discuss his latest research related to ...


    By Ohio State University

  • Integrating animal and crop production can reduce nutrient leaching from agricultural fields

    Nutrient leaching, the movement of plant nutrients from soil to water, can have negative effects on aquatic ecosystems due to eutrophication, which reduces the oxygen available in water, causing species and habitat loss. Ecological Recycling Agriculture (ERA), which is based on ecological principles and integrates crop production and animal husbandry, may limit this effect. This study ...

  • Yield projections for Switchgrass as a Biofuel Crop

    While scientists have conducted numerous studies on production of biomass from biofuel crops, such as switchgrass, no one has yet compiled this information to evaluate the response of biomass yield to soils, climate, and crop management across the United States. A team of researchers from Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Dartmouth College published just such a study in the July-August 2010 ...

  • Biofuel crops increase carbon emissions

    The conversion of forests and grasslands into fields for the plants offsets the benefit of using the fuel, researchers find. Greenhouse-gas output overall would rise instead of fall. The rush to grow biofuel crops -- widely embraced as part of the solution to global warming -- is actually increasing greenhouse gas emissions rather than reducing them, according to two studies published Thursday in ...

  • Soil phosphorus in an organic cropping system

    Phosphorus is a nonrenewable resource, raising concerns that agricultural practices may deplete reserves. (For one overview discussion of phosphorus, see Phosphorus Famine: The Threat to Our Food Supply in the June 2009 Scientific American.) Organic farming with low phosphorus  inputs can result in deficient levels of plant-available phosphorus (available-P).A group of researchers from ...


    By American Society of Agronomy

  • CSIRO and Bayer to focus on sustainable crops

    This collaboration will develop and apply models to assess the system-wide consequences of new-generation cereal crops in the face of global environmental and food security challenges. The project will assess the full environmental impact of the crops, including their influence on the carbon footprint of cereal production. This program will build on a long-term cereal research agreement between ...

  • New crop sprayer is kinder on the environment

    An EU project has developed a new crop spray system for orchards that is precise, efficient and safer for the environment. It sprays pesticides according to the needs of the crop and local environment, and can reduce spray drift by up to 80 per cent. Preliminary field tests conducted in Poland have demonstrated its effectiveness. The EU has adopted a framework directive on the sustainable use of ...

  • Urbanization, export crops drive deforestation

    The drivers of tropical deforestation have shifted in the early 21st century to hinge on growth of cities and the globalized agricultural trade, a new large-scale study concludes. The observations starkly reverse assumptions by some scientists that fast-growing urbanization and the efficiencies of global trade might eventually slow or ...

  • Squeezing more crop out of each drop of water

    Studies in China and Colorado by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists and cooperators have revealed some interesting tactics on how to irrigate with limited water, based on a crop’s critical growth stages. Laj Ahuja, research leader at the ARS Agricultural Systems Research Unit in Fort Collins, Colo., and colleagues conducted the studies. As one example, with wheat in China, they found ...

  • Impact of volunteer GM maize on conventional crops is low

    A recent EU-supported study has analysed the development of volunteer or 'rogue' GM (genetically modified) maize plants in a conventional crop field. It finds that their numbers are low and do not exceed the EU's threshold of 0.9 per cent for incidental GM content. Scientific data on the role of maize volunteers on cross-pollination is limited. The most detailed studies have been conducted in ...

  • Predicting disease and improving crops through genetics

    Can scientists accurately predict when an individual will develop a disease? What if we could predict how to increase drought resistance in plants? Or offer patients personalized medicine? Researchers are looking for answers to these questions and more using a plant or animal’s obvious traits, called phenotype prediction, a field that will be discussed in a free workshop presented by the ...

  • Crop management: how small do we go?

    The use of on-the-go crop and soil sensors has greatly increased the precision with which farmers can manage their crops. Recently released research in Agronomy Journal questions whether more precise management is necessarily more efficient. They discovered that the law of diminishing returns applies to precision agriculture, calculating how large of an application area is optimal for precision ...

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