fish genetic research News

  • Sustainable fishing: the dangers of ignoring sub-stocks

    In Europe, some fisheries have been driven to near collapse - most notably cod stocks in the North Atlantic. A recent study warns of the potential dangers of using a single-management technique across a whole species. Instead, distinct populations should be identified with tailored management techniques where necessary. Over-fishing and a changing climate are placing extreme pressures on many ...

  • Vaccination of farmed fish good for animals and thus for humans

    More than half of the fish consumed worldwide is cultivated in ponds or tanks. And the percentage of cultivated fish in relation to wild fish is increasing. The scale on which fish are currently farmed makes it necessary to protect them, by means of vaccination, against disease and premature death. An understanding of the immune system in fish will hopefully lead to effective vaccination methods ...

  • Lockheed Martin´s Technology-Infused Mobile Fish Pen Named A Top 25 Invention By TIME Magazine

    You've heard the old saying — there are plenty of fish in the sea — however, this may not always be the case. The inability of wild fisheries to supply the burgeoning demand for healthful and protein-rich seafood has given rise to a ...


    By Lockheed Martin

  • New Project to Facilitate Transnational Access to Leading European Aquaculture Research Facilities

    AQUAEXCEL2020, a research infrastructure project funded under the EU’s Horizon 2020 programme and coordinated by the French National Institute for Agricultural Research (INRA), has kicked off this month with the aim to further support the sustainable growth of the European aquaculture sector. AQUAEXCEL2020 will integrate a large group of leading European aquaculture research facilities and ...

  • AgriMarine Signs Collaborative Research & Development Agreement With Chinese Fisheries Institute

    (TSX VENTURE: FSH)(FRANKFURT: A2G)(OTCQX: AGMHF) AgriMarine Holdings Inc. (the "Company" or "AgriMarine"), the leader in floating closed containment technology and production for sustainable finfish aquaculture, and Pearl River Fisheries Research Institute ("Pearl River") in Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, People's Republic of China, are pleased to announce the signing of an agreement for the ...


    By Marketwire

  • Can managed introductions boost threatened populations?

    Supplementing declining salmon populations with fish from other, genetically distinct populations may not be the best method of conservation, according to a recent study. The researchers found that for certain salmon populations in France such introductions resulted in offspring with lower body weight and length, possibly worsening their decline. Some previous studies have found that ...

  • Breeding more uniform Nile Tilapia

    For fish farmers, uniformity of growth and body size is one of the key traits to be improved in future breeding programs. In domestic Nile Tilapia size differences among individuals are very large but the genetic background of this variability is almost entirely unknown. In a new study, published by Genetics Selection Evolution, researchers of Wageningen UR found that variability of harvest ...

  • Surrogate sushi: Japan biotech for bluefin tuna

    Of all the overfished fish in the seas, luscious, fatty bluefin tuna are among the most threatened. Marine scientist Goro Yamazaki, who is known in this seaside community as "Young Mr. Fish," is working to ensure the species survives. Yamazaki is fine-tuning a technology to use mackerel surrogates to spawn the bluefin, a process he hopes will enable fisheries to raise the huge, torpedo-shaped ...


    By Associated Press

  • Herring organs damaged by acidified seawater

    Ocean acidification could damage the organs of Atlantic herring, as well as slow their growth and development, recent experiments show. It adds to the list of pressures currently threatening this commercially important species, including over-fishing and marine pollution. Our oceans are changing as high levels of atmospheric CO2 dissolve into seawater and lower its pH to become more acidic. The ...

  • Transgenic Corn Found to Damage Stream Ecosystems

    BLOOMINGTON, Indiana, October 11, 2007 (ENS) - A widely planted variety of genetically engineered corn has the potential to harm aquatic ecosystems, finds a new study by an Indiana University professor of environmental science and his colleagues. Pollen and other plant parts containing toxins from genetically engineered Bt corn are washing into streams near cornfields and harming a ...

  • Floating vegetative mats may help clean fishery wastewater

    The feasibility of using floating vegetation to remove nutrients from fishery wastewater is being tested by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists. The researchers' long-term goal is to develop a system to treat the wastewater, return it to ponds for reuse, and use the nutrients to produce biomass or plant material. The floating mats act as filters to remove the nutrients from the water. ...

  • Overcoming Smallholder Challenges with Biotechnology

    A new FAO publication calls for greater national and international efforts to bring agricultural biotechnologies to smallholder producers in developing countries. The publication, Biotechnologies at Work for Smallholders: Case Studies from Developing Countries in Crops, Livestock and Fish, asserts biotechnologies can help ...

  • STW-Breed4Food Partnership for sustainable livestock breeding

    Technology Foundation STW and the business consortium Breed4Food have launched an ambitious new research programme that links many scientific disciplines with livestock breeding. The aim of the programme – known as the STW-Breed4Food Partnership – is to acquire new insights into sustainability, animal health and welfare and to improve efficiency. STW and the ...

  • Skretting Ecuador launch captures progressive spirit of the shrimp farming industry

    The Skretting Ecuador brand has been officially launched in Ecuador and Peru. Skretting Ecuador will use the company’s worldwide R&D knowledge, combined with its local insight and experience to support shrimp farmers with the overriding aim to increase their production in a more sustainable manner. Skretting Ecuador has been launched to support the growing need for sustainable ...


    By Skretting - Nutreco Group

  • Pesticide can turn male frogs into females

    Atrazine, a herbicide used globally but banned in the EU, can cause chemical castration and complete feminisation in adult male frogs, according to a recent study. The researchers suggest atrazine could contribute to the global decline of amphibians. Atrazine is one of the world's most commonly used herbicides. It is typically used to control weeds in agriculture, such as in the production of ...

  • Shrimp growth breakthrough

    Aligning the right high-specification nutrition with precise feed management procedures could bring a new golden era for shrimp farmers in Ecuador and across Latin America. Skretting has gone through countless aspects of shrimp feed management, with strong emphasis on confirming the best nutrient composition of its feeds as well as to establish the optimal number of feed occasions. In controlling ...


    By Skretting - Nutreco Group

  • Chile, India link up for rural development

    Chile and India will work together to promote agricultural innovation and explore the potential of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in improving rural livelihoods. The MS Swaminathan Research Foundation (MSSRF) signed an agreement on agricultural cooperation with Chile's Foundation for Agricultural Innovation (FIA) in Chennai last month (20 March). MSSRF chairman M. S. ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Pincoy Project: Chilean Salmon Industry presents a collaborative measure to reduce its antibiotic use

    Global and local companies operating in Chile, led by Skretting, AquaGen/Blue Genomics, Pharmaq, Centrovet, Cermaq, Blumar and Ventisqueros have started a joint effort specifically aimed at helping Chile’s salmon industry to reduce its antibiotic use. In Chile, the salmon industry’s heavy use of antibiotics has long been the subject of fierce criticism, which culminated this year with ...


    By Skretting - Nutreco Group

  • Report on Health and Biodiversity Demonstrates Human Health Benefits from Protecting Biodiversity

    A ground-breaking report on biodiversity and health, launched today at the 14th World Congress on Public Health, in Kolkata, India, shows the significant contribution of biodiversity and ecosystem services to better human health. The report, Connecting Global Priorities: Biodiversity and Human Health, demonstrates that the relationship between biodiversity and human health is extensive and ...

  • Farmer-Funded Innovations: checkoff breakthroughs support on-farm profitability

    Successful companies in the aviation, communications, computer and medical industries don’t stand still. They find solutions that will keep them a step ahead of the competition. That goes for farmers, too. Soybean farmers today see the results of innovation everywhere they turn. More seed varieties and machinery applications. More ways to get the information they need to help them make ...


    By United Soybean Board (USB)

Need help finding the right suppliers? Try XPRT Sourcing. Let the XPRTs do the work for you