fish larvae News

  • Plastic debris in the Danube outnumbers fish larvae

    Plastic debris in the Danube outnumbers fish larvae Pieces of plastic litter outnumber fish larvae in the Austrian Danube River, new research has found. This is worrying, as some fish are likely to mistake the plastic for the prey they would normally feed on. This litter may also contribute to marine pollution; the researchers estimated that at least 4.2 tonnes of plastic debris enter the Black ...

  • Northern fish stocks in good shape

    FISH stocks in the North Sea and Barents Sea, two of the most important northern hemisphere fishing areas, are in good shape, according to the latest assessment by marine scientists. But there is evidence that the seas in those areas are becoming warmer. The Norwegian Institute of Marine Research has been studying the state of several different types of fish. It has found that in the North ...


    By FISHupdate

  • Hormones in wastewater disrupt fish reproduction over generations

    Synthetic oestrogens in wastewater from contraceptive pills can have effects on fish reproduction and survival that worsen over several generations, new research has found. The study suggests that some fish populations may not be able to recover from levels of oestrogen pollution found in many freshwater environments. Freshwater ecosystems are increasingly under threat from both climate change ...

  • Sting operation - jellyfish `blooms` may endanger fish stocks

    Surges in jellyfish populations may be one reason for a drop in fish stocks observed in the Mediterranean and Black Sea, according to a new report published by FAO. Overfishing, which removes top predators from the sea, is one of the factors behind jellyfish "blooms", or suddenly increased numbers. A "vicious circle" can then follow in which large numbers of medusae feed on fish larvae and ...

  • Knowledge of spatial dynamics is critical when determining harvest strategies for fish in meta-populations

    New research published in the Marine Stewardship Council’s Science Series highlights the importance of understanding spatial structure and connectivity of meta-population fish stocks when assessing the sustainability of fisheries. Unlike many self-sustaining ‘closed’ populations, meta-populations are interconnected networks encompassing a number of distinct sub-populations that ...

  • Jellyfish infestations caused by human activities

    A huge rise in jellyfish populations around the world appears to be caused by human activities, according to recent research. Early action is essential to prevent marine ecosystems from changing to unhealthy states that favour destructive jellyfish blooms. Although large numbers of jellyfish can occur in healthy marine ecosystems, destructive jellyfish blooms are being observed more frequently in ...

  • Herring organs damaged by acidified seawater

    Ocean acidification could damage the organs of Atlantic herring, as well as slow their growth and development, recent experiments show. It adds to the list of pressures currently threatening this commercially important species, including over-fishing and marine pollution. Our oceans are changing as high levels of atmospheric CO2 dissolve into seawater and lower its pH to become more acidic. The ...

  • US, Cuba to sign first environmental accord since thaw

    The United States and Cuba on Wednesday are set to reach their first accord on environmental protection since announcing plans to re-establish diplomatic relations, linking up marine sanctuaries in both countries to cooperate on preservation and research. U.S. National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration chief Kathryn Sullivan arrived in Havana ...


    By Associated Press

  • Warming will leave drought-hit California reeling

    Things could soon get worse for drought-hit California. New research predicts that, by the close of the century, global warming could have reduced the flow of water from the Sierra Nevada mountains by at least a quarter. Michael Goulden, associate professor of earth system science at the University of California ...


    By Climate News Network

  • Less Than 3 Percent of Oceans in Marine Parks Despite Recent Growth

    By J. Matthew Roney In May 1975, rising concerns about overfishing and deteriorating ocean health prompted scientists and officials from 33 countries to meet in Tokyo for the first global conference on marine parks and reserves. Noting the need for swift action to safeguard more of the sea, the delegates were unanimous in calling for the creation of a global system of marine protected areas ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Organic pesticides may not always be the best choice

    Organic pesticides may not always be the most environmentally-friendly choice of pest control, according to recent research. Two new synthetic pesticides for controlling aphids were found to be less harmful to other species and more efficient than the two new organic pesticides tested in the study. It is often thought that newer organic and natural pesticides are uniformly safer and therefore ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

  • Sarasota Bay Watch (SBW) Receives Third Place Gulf Guardian Award in the Civic/Non-Profit Organization Category

    The Gulf of Mexico Program recently announced Sarasota Bay Watch (SBW) will receive a Third Place 2013 Gulf Guardian Award in the Civic/Non-Profit Organization Category for its Sarasota Bay Scallop Restoration Project. The awards ceremony will be held on June 26, 2013, at the Tampa Bay Grand Hyatt beginning at 6PM. Sarasota Bay Watch’s created a community-based partnership of engaged ...

  • Transgenic Corn Found to Damage Stream Ecosystems

    BLOOMINGTON, Indiana, October 11, 2007 (ENS) - A widely planted variety of genetically engineered corn has the potential to harm aquatic ecosystems, finds a new study by an Indiana University professor of environmental science and his colleagues. Pollen and other plant parts containing toxins from genetically engineered Bt corn are washing into streams near cornfields and harming a ...

  • Alien invaders threaten world Heritage Site

    Alien wildlife species are multiplying around Europe's Wadden Sea, posing a serious threat to biodiversity. The warning came in a new report launched on Wadden Sea Day - a platform for recent research on the marine World Heritage Site that borders the Netherlands, Germany and Denmark. As well as reducing biodiversity, the abundant alien species could also prove an economic burden to the Wadden ...

  • Ecosystem-based farming comes of age

    A new FAO book out today takes a close look at how the world's major cereals maize, rice and wheat - which together account for an estimated 42.5 percent of human calories and 37 percent of our protein - can be grown in ways that respect and even leverage natural ecosystems. Drawing on case studies from around the planet, the ...

  • Departments of Environmental Protection and Health Remind Pennsylvanians to Take Precautions to Prevent West Nile Virus

    Pennsylvania's Department of Environmental Protection today reported the season's first two detections of West Nile virus-carrying mosquitos since surveillance began in early May. The infected mosquitos were collected May 22 in Harborcreek Township, Erie County and May 23 in Straban Township, Adams County. Typically, the state's ...

  • Aided by the Sea, Israel Overcomes an Old Foe: Drought

    A hefty tax was placed on excessive household water consumption, penalizing families with lawns, swimming pools or leaky pipes. So many of Mr. Zvieli’s clients went over to synthetic grass and swapped their seasonal blooms for hardy, indigenous plants more suited to a semiarid climate. “I worried about where gardening was going,” said Mr. Zvieli, 56, who has tended ...


    By IDE Technologies

Need help finding the right suppliers? Try XPRT Sourcing. Let the XPRTs do the work for you