flower News

  • Where have all the flowers gone?

    Global food production may be approaching another major crisis. Crops around the world are pollinated by honeybees, but bee populations are dying off rapidly due to excessive use of pesticides and other environmental factors. The threat of food production losses is becoming painfully apparent, and the economic, social and environmental costs could be staggering. This growing threat to the global ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

  • ATG: Tyres in service of ‘flowering beauties’

    “Tulips from Amsterdam” have often been sung about, and indeed fields of flowering tulips characterise the Dutch landscape in spring time. Just as other high value crops, tulips require farmers to pay particular attention to the protection of plants and bulbs. That is why R&D engineers at ATG developed the Alliance Row Crop Radial. “These tyres offer superior protection for ...


    By Alliance Tire Group (ATG)

  • Innovative Risk Management Program a First for Ontario`s Greenhouse Flower Growers

    The governments of Canada and Ontario are helping the province's greenhouse industry meet consumer demand for high quality floral products by supporting an innovative, private sector risk management fund.  The industry-designed GreenCHIP fund will provide compensation for lost product and business interruption in the event of a quarantine ordered by the Canada Food Inspection Agency. Flowers ...

  • Loss of flowering plants: higher risks with non-random extinction

    A recent study has shown that among flowering plants, species-loss does not occur randomly, but is clustered in families that contain only a small number of species. This suggests that the impact of biodiversity loss will be greater than previously thought and that resources should be targeted on particular plant families. Genetic relationships between flowering plant species (angiosperms) can be ...

  • EXPOFLOR 2009: Promotion of the flower for growing media and soil improvers

    On 6-8 March 2009, the Spanish (Murcia) Competent Body manned a booth at the EXPOFLOR 2009 fair to show the advantages of the European Ecolabel and EMAS for growing media and soil improvers. EXPOFLOR takes place in Lorca every two years and provides the opportunity for national and international representatives in the horticulture and gardening sectors to showcase their newest technologies and ...

  • April Flowers Bring May Birds – Protect Seeds Early

    The springtime is full of new life and regrowth, especially in the form of garden planting and crop harvesting. Unfortunately, spring garden planting is extremely enticing to pest birds and other animals that are in search of a reliable food source after a long winter. Read on to learn how you can ...


    By Avian Enterprises, LLC

  • Patches of flowers boost pollinator diversity and lead to higher crop yields

    Falling levels of insect pollination are causing declining yields of important agricultural crops. However, new research from South Africa now indicates that planting small patches of native flowers in agricultural fields can be a profitable and sustainable method of increasing pollination and yield. Insect pollination is a vital ecosystem service as animal-pollinated crops form an ...

  • Monarch Power Introduces Lotus Mobile, World`s First Mobile Solar ‘Flower Power’

    Professor Joseph Hui is such a fan of butterflies that two years ago he named his company Monarch Power after them. Their wings and flowers they visit became important steppingstones in the development of Lotus Mobile, the world’s first solar unit that tracks the sun, folds up at night and has beautiful "solar petals" just like the lotus flower that inspired it. ...


    By Monarch Power Corp.

  • EPA celebrates 20th year as exhibitor in the Philadelphia flower show with best of show award in the non-academic education category

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's 2012 exhibit entitled "Palekaiko Nalowale" (Paradise Lost) demonstrates the importance of wetlands and how water provides the basic building block of life as it flows from a cascading brook and emerges from the forest to form a bog wetland. Bogs are wet, spongy areas and visitors to the exhibit will learn about their important ecological function in ...

  • US Labor Department`s OSHA cites B R Flowers & Co. Inc. and Tidewater Staffing Inc. after July heat fatality in Norfolk, Va.

    B R Flowers & Co. Inc., a ship repair company in Hampton, and Tidewater Staffing Inc. in Portsmouth, have each been cited by the U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration for a serious violation of OSHA's general duty clause after a temporary worker died from excessive heat while cleaning up debris on the deck of the USS Nitze. The ship was located at Pier 5 at ...

  • New rice strain could help farmers predetermine harvest time

    A new strain of rice that flowers within a certain period of time after being sprayed with commercial chemicals commonly used to protect rice from fungal diseases is now available, say Japanese scientists. This new strain could one day allow rice farmers to dictate the timing of their harvest regardless of weather, temperature and other conditions that currently affect cultivation. Temperature, ...


    By ScienceDaily

  • Some plants are more sensitive to herbicides during reproductive stages of life cycle

    This study assessed the effects of herbicides on non-target plants in Denmark and Canada. The findings showed that some plants are more sensitive to herbicides in the reproductive stages of their life cycle and can experience delays in flowering and reduced seed production. The authors say future ecological assessments should consider reproductive outcomes. Herbicides are some of the most widely ...

  • Which seeds to sow for bees?

    Farmers could help to maintain populations of bees and other pollinators by sowing inexpensive seed mixes on their land, a new study suggests. Researchers surveyed pollinators visiting study plots in Berkshire, UK, and explored how sowing different seed mixes and using different management techniques affected the flowers produced and the pollinators visiting them. Overall, 84% of the crop ...

  • Wild insects could take over the pollinating role of honeybees

    Scientists have identified several wild insects that could undertake the crop pollination function of honeybees. By comparing a range of pollinating insects they found three wild species that appear to be as efficient as the honeybee in pollination but may need management to increase their numbers. The honeybee (Apis mellifera) is in rapid decline worldwide. While it is important to understand ...

  • Bee-friendly agri-environmental schemes need diverse habitats

    Diverse agri-environmental schemes which combine flowering crops with semi-natural habitats, such as grasslands and hedgerows, will be best for bees, new research suggests. The researchers examined the foraging behaviour of honey bees, bumblebees and other wild bees and found that all bees used semi-natural habitats, which were particularly important for wild bees, in addition to crops, such as ...

  • Sclerotinia alert in oilseed rape

    Varied establishment of oilseed rape (OSR) crops last Autumn, is likely to have resulted in a protracted flowering period in areas across the UK, leaving crops susceptible to Sclerotinia infection over the coming weeks. With AHDB Cereals and Oilseeds reporting that levels of Sclerotinia are medium to high in some locations, Chris Charnock, Certis’ arable product manager, warns of the risks ...


    By Certis UK

  • Designer Eucalypts For Urban Landscapes

    This story was orginally posted in News from the University of Adelaide, Thursday, 23 May, 2013 University of Adelaide researchers are working with the Australian nursery industry to produce ‘designer eucalypts’ more suitable for our home gardens and urban landscapes than many trees currently available. Led by ...


  • Ozone pollution reduces tomato fruit yield and viability

    Ozone harms pollen viability of tomatoes, leading to reduced fruit weight, size and quality, a recent study has revealed. The researchers suggest the effect of ozone on pollen could be a useful way to rapidly test for pollution-induced stress on crop plants in risk assessments. Ground-level ozone damages plants as well as posing a risk to human health. It negatively affects crop yields and causes ...

  • Do agri-environmental schemes benefit insect pollinators?

    Agri-environmental schemes (AES) do successfully enhance the number and variety of insect pollinators, research suggests. They are particularly effective when implemented in arable landscapes which also contain some semi-natural habitat. AES were introduced in Europe in the early 1990s in response to declining farmland biodiversity. However, evaluations of their efficacy for biodiversity ...

  • Florendovirus: new genus of virus in plant genomes

    While the extent and importance of endogenous viral elements have been thoroughly researched in animals, there is a dearth of knowledge when it comes to plants. Within the framework of a broader international effort, researchers at INRA Versailles-Grignon and Cirad have described a new genus of the Caulimoviridae family of viruses, called Florendovirus, whose members have colonised the genomes of ...

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