flower seed News

  • April Flowers Bring May Birds – Protect Seeds Early

    The springtime is full of new life and regrowth, especially in the form of garden planting and crop harvesting. Unfortunately, spring garden planting is extremely enticing to pest birds and other animals that are in search of a reliable food source after a long winter. Read on to learn how you can ...


    By Avian Enterprises, LLC

  • Where have all the flowers gone?

    Global food production may be approaching another major crisis. Crops around the world are pollinated by honeybees, but bee populations are dying off rapidly due to excessive use of pesticides and other environmental factors. The threat of food production losses is becoming painfully apparent, and the economic, social and environmental costs could be staggering. This growing threat to the global ...


    By GLOBE Foundation

  • Which seeds to sow for bees?

    Farmers could help to maintain populations of bees and other pollinators by sowing inexpensive seed mixes on their land, a new study suggests. Researchers surveyed pollinators visiting study plots in Berkshire, UK, and explored how sowing different seed mixes and using different management techniques affected the flowers produced and the pollinators visiting them. Overall, 84% of the crop ...

  • Global Seeds Industry

    Reportlinker.com announces that a new market research report is available in its catalogue: Global Seeds Industry ...


    By ReportLinker

  • Patches of flowers boost pollinator diversity and lead to higher crop yields

    Falling levels of insect pollination are causing declining yields of important agricultural crops. However, new research from South Africa now indicates that planting small patches of native flowers in agricultural fields can be a profitable and sustainable method of increasing pollination and yield. Insect pollination is a vital ecosystem service as animal-pollinated crops form an ...

  • Hudson Valley organic farm produces seeds largely by hand

    Drying corn stalks wilt in late summer sun as Ken Greene tours his crops. Calendula flowers are past bloom and brown. Melon leaves lay crinkled by the dirt. Plants have, literally, gone to seed. A perfect picture for an organic seed harvest. "It looks like hell now, but it's actually good for the seeds," said Greene, co-founder of the Hudson Valley Seed Library. The small business 70 miles ...


    By Associated Press

  • The Global Seeds Market is Projected to Reach $85,237.6 million by 2018

    This report estimates the market size of the global seeds in terms of revenue. The global seeds market is projected to reach $85,237.6 million by 2018, due to increasing worldwide demand for food at CAGR of 12.1% from 2013 to 2018. Global seeds market drivers, restraints &; challenges, winning imperatives, burning issues, and trends are discussed in detail in this report. Significant ...

  • Some plants are more sensitive to herbicides during reproductive stages of life cycle

    This study assessed the effects of herbicides on non-target plants in Denmark and Canada. The findings showed that some plants are more sensitive to herbicides in the reproductive stages of their life cycle and can experience delays in flowering and reduced seed production. The authors say future ecological assessments should consider reproductive outcomes. Herbicides are some of the most widely ...

  • Fast-Growing Plants Adapt Quickly to Climate Change

    IRVINE, California (ENS) - Plants with short life cycles can adapt in just a few years to climate change, University of California-Irvine, UCI, scientists have discovered. This finding suggests that plants that grow rapidly such as weeds may cope better with global warming than slower-growing plants such as redwood trees. 'Some species evolve fast enough to keep up ...

  • Bees under bombardment: New report shows multiple factors behind pollinator losses

    A new UNEP report will show that bee colonies worldwide are under threat, with serious implications for biodiversity and food security. The report - 'Global Honey Bee Colony Disorders and Other Threats to Insect Pollinators' - finds that multiple factors are responsible for declines in bee populations. These include habitat deterioration, air pollution, crop spraying and the widespread use of ...

  • Proactive stewardship is critical in sustainable agriculture

    Bayer CropScience is committed to proactive stewardship to underline the company’s strong commitment to sustainable agriculture. “We help growers around the world produce high-quality and high-yielding crops,” said Matthias Haug, Head of SeedGrowth at Bayer CropScience. “We take product stewardship very seriously, as it is important to maximize the benefits of seed ...


    By Bayer CropScience AG

  • Insect diversity improves crop pollination

    The decline in numbers of wild bees has caused concern regarding falling levels of pollination for important agricultural crops. Researchers have now demonstrated that the diversity of the pollinator community can significantly affect pollination. Insect pollination is a vital ecosystem service; a large proportion of the human diet either directly or indirectly depends on animal-based ...

  • Big society can help tackle ragwort risk

    Tackling Common Ragwort can be a practical example of the Big Society in action, Agriculture Minister Jim Paice said today. Tackling Common Ragwort can be a practical example of the Big Society in action, Agriculture Minister Jim Paice said today. With the Common Ragwort season in full bloom, Mr Paice is calling on landowners, local groups and nature-lovers to work together to ...

  • Method to differentiate open pollinated varieties of maize developed

    Open pollinated varieties of maize are going to be easier to distinguish from each other, thanks to scientists at the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT) in Africa and Mexico. They have developed a new technique to differentiate the genes of one open pollinated variety from another, particularly important to African farmers, most of whom do not plant hybrid varieties. The ...

  • Bees under bombardment

    More than a dozen factors, ranging from declines in flowering plants and the use of memory-damaging insecticides to the world-wide spread of pests and air pollution, may be behind the emerging decline of bee colonies across many parts of the globe. Scientists are warning that without profound changes to the way human-beings manage the planet, declines in pollinators needed to feed a growing ...

  • CJP introduces Biological Inputs to Enhance the Jatropha Energy Farms Profitability

    CJP scientists are continuously working on enhanced genetics, agronomics and horticulture sciences to drive new varieties, more knowledge around the Jatropha plant’s nutritional requirements and more science-based processes for the care and custody of the plant and have achieved reliable and scalable results in Jatropha energy farming. Reliance on inorganic ...


    By Advanced Biofuel Center

  • Bee pollination improves crop quality as well as quantity

    Bee pollination improves the shape, weight and shelf-life of strawberries, contributing a staggering €1.05 billion to the European strawberry market per year, new research suggests. By blocking bees from a set of plants, the researchers demonstrated the substantial effects of bee pollination on the quality of the fruit. It is well established that insect pollination increases the quantity of ...

  • New Strategy to Limit Neonicotinoids and Other “High Risk” Pesticides in Québec

    In a press release issued on November 22, 2015, the Canadian province of Québec (Quebec) announced its release of Québec Pesticide Strategy 2015-2018.  Although the Strategy itself is available only in ...


    By Bergeson & Campbell, P.C.

  • Federal, state, local partners clean up toxic WWII era greenhouse to create affordable housing, jobs

    A former Bay Area nursery site once contaminated with pesticides, is now being cleaned up to pave the way for new housing and open space. The project will create about 300 ‘green jobs’ in construction and remediation in the San Francisco Bay Area. Richmond Mayor Gayle McLaughlin will be joined today by Keith Takata, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Deputy Regional Administrator, ...

  • Afghanistan: New Survey Techniques improve Opium Poppy Monitoring

    Accurate monitoring of opium poppy production in Afghanistan – responsible for 90% of the world’s supply of the illegal crop – has become increasingly difficult with rising security concerns, but remote sensing survey techniques developed by Cranfield University have proved critical in providing accurate information to inform UK and international policy and counter-narcotics ...


    By Cranfield University

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