forage crop News

  • Forage crop promising as ecologically friendly ornamental groundcover

    A new, ecologically friendly groundcover for warm-weather landscapes is on the horizon. Rhizoma peanut, a warm-season perennial native to South America, has been used almost exclusively as a forage crop in the United States since the 1930s, but a study in the July HortScience says the perennial has potential as an ornamental groundcover or turf alternative. "Rhizoma peanut is grown in U.S. ...

  • Commercial Forage Box added to hay/forage equipment lineup

    Combining size with strength, Art’s Way’s new heavy-duty commercial forage box is designed with the commercial farmer and livestock producer in mind. “The new forage box has a rugged, robust design, the materials it’s made of are chosen for their durability,” said Guadalupe Diaz, design sales engineer at Art’s Way. “It will provide years of trouble free ...

  • Soil phosphorus in an organic cropping system

    Phosphorus is a nonrenewable resource, raising concerns that agricultural practices may deplete reserves. (For one overview discussion of phosphorus, see Phosphorus Famine: The Threat to Our Food Supply in the June 2009 Scientific American.) Organic farming with low phosphorus  inputs can result in deficient levels of plant-available phosphorus (available-P).A group of researchers from ...


    By American Society of Agronomy

  • Cover crops reduce erosion, runoff

    Cover crops may be more effective at reducing soil erosion and runoff after maize harvest than rough tillage, according to scientists from the Université Catholique de Louvain, in collaboration with the Independent Center for the Promotion of Forage (CIPF). The three-year study, supervised by Charles Bielders and conducted by Eric Laloy, measured erosion and runoff losses from silt loam ...

  • Cover Crops Add to Farm Sustainability

    A potentially record-setting U.S. corn harvest is underway. Many farmers can attribute the use of cover crops as one of multiple best management practices (BMPs) that help them increase yield year after year. Combined with BMPs of The Fertilizer Institute’s 4R Nutrient Stewardship program that promotes the application of nutrients at the right source, right rate, right time and right place, ...

  • Predicting disease and improving crops through genetics

    Can scientists accurately predict when an individual will develop a disease? What if we could predict how to increase drought resistance in plants? Or offer patients personalized medicine? Researchers are looking for answers to these questions and more using a plant or animal’s obvious traits, called phenotype prediction, a field that will be discussed in a free workshop presented by the ...

  • Crop Growers Told to Prepare for Low Price Era

    Following some of the best years ever for growing row crops, an agricultural economist advised farmers to prepare for several years of lower prices, at a workshop at the American Farm Bureau Federation’s 95th Annual Convention. “The last six years have been extraordinary years if you are a row crop producer,” said Matthew Roberts, an associate professor at Ohio State ...

  • Crop breeding gets boost from sweet potatoes

    In Uganda, the sweet potato is a major staple crop. Behind China and Nigeria, Uganda produces the most sweet potatoes in the world. Nationwide, families grow the crop to feed themselves, their livestock and to use as a source of income. Small scale agricultural operations use a large number of sweet potato varieties in their planting. These varieties are steadily being lost due to weevils, sweet ...

  • Keeping tabs on the next generation of transgenic crops

    A team of government and university crop scientists from across Canada has developed a scientific framework for monitoring the release of second-generation genetically modified crops. The framework is designed to assess the risks of novel genes entering wild populations. First-generation genetically modified (GM)/transgenic crops with novel traits have been grown in a number of countries since ...

  • Crop Science Society of America announces the 2010 class of fellows

    The CropScience Society of America(CSSA) will continue a time-honored tradition this year with the presentation of the following individuals as 2010 CSSA Fellows at a special Awards Ceremony during their Annual Meeting on Oct. 31-Nov. 3 in Long Beach, CA, www.acsmeetings.org. Members of the Society nominate worthy colleagues based on their professional ...

  • Cover Crop Workshops Featured at the Iowa Power Farming Show

    All you ever wanted to know about cover crops will be in one place next week. Whether you use cover crops or are still evaluating them, save time and money by attending the Cover Crop Workshops at this year’s Iowa Power Farming Show, January 28-30, in Des Moines, Iowa.   The Workshops will feature grain and livestock farmers with ...

  • Crop Science Society of America Presents Awards in Long Beach

    The Crop Science Society of America (CSSA) will recognize the following individuals at the 2010 Awards Ceremony on Oct. 31-Nov. 3 during their Annual Meetings in Long Beach, CA, www.acsmeetings.org. The annual awards are presented for outstanding contributions to crop science through education, national and international service, and research. ...

  • Can new biopesticide protect crops without harming honeybees?

    A potential new biopesticide, made of spider venom and snowdrop proteins, kills agricultural pests but shows minimal toxicity to honeybees, new research suggests. Learning and memory of honeybees exposed to the biopesticide were not affected, even at doses higher than they would normally encounter in the environment. Insect pollination is vital for food production; however, there are concerns ...

  • Insect-eating bats save global maize farmers €0.91 billion a year from crop damage

    Insect-eating bats are estimated to be worth US$ 1 billion (€0.91 billion) a year to maize farmers around the world, a new study has revealed. Not only do bats reduce crop damage by eating adult corn earworm crop pests, they also suppress fungal infections in maize ears. Bats and their habitats need to be better protected for their ecological and economic contributions, say the study’s ...

  • Grass-based farming systems: Soil conservation and environmental quality

    Crop selection and sequence can have a profound effect on the environment and on farm profitability. According to Chapter 7, “Grass-based Farming Systems: Soil Conservation and Environmental Quality” by Jeremy W. Singer, Alan J. Franzluebbers, and Douglas L. Karlen in the book, Grassland Quietness and Strength for a New American Agriculture, the basis for a productive agricultural system should ...

  • Ultra-low volume preservatives boost user convenience

    He says: “The Ecosyler ULV applicator can treat 900 tonne of crop with one fill applying 20 ml of preservative per tonne, and it is also highly accurate. If you put in enough product for 100 acres, you can be sure it is supplied correctly.” Each unit is supplied with a 22-litre tank, which has a three-way valve and low level indicator, and is mounted on a stainless steel frame. ...


    By Ecosyl Products Limited

  • Drought Tolerant rice in development

    Rice production faces the threat of a growing worldwide water scarcity. Approximately, 75% of the world’s rice is grown in flooded, lowland conditions. Lowland rice crops either rely on irrigation or rain water to provide adequate growing conditions. The food security of millions of people depends on the availability of water.   Scientists at the International Rice Research Institute ...

  • Corn Residue Great Option for Livestock Supplemental Feed

    Corn residue left over from harvesting can make an excellent source of supplemental feed for livestock, according to a forage expert from the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. This is especially true for producers who are facing lower hay crop inventories thanks to the excessive rains that impacted the region during the beginning of the ...


    By Ohio State University

  • New Agreement between John Deere and Scherer Design Engineering

    Deere & Company announces a joint development agreement with Scherer Design Engineering, Inc. to develop and commercialize kernel processing solutions for self-propelled forage harvesters. "Deere is committed to developing industry leading kernel processing solutions with the goal to drive higher milk production in dairy cows," says Jon Chase, global director, ...


    By John Deere

  • Tall fescue toxicosis and management

    Tall fescue toxicosis is one of the most devastating problems facing forage-livestock agriculture. While there is currently no cure for this costly disorder, there are proven management strategies to lessen the impact of toxicosis. A new professional guide, Tall Fescue Toxicosis and Management is now available to livestock producers and land managers who want to better understand and control ...

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