forage testing News

  • Tall fescue toxicosis and management

    Tall fescue toxicosis is one of the most devastating problems facing forage-livestock agriculture. While there is currently no cure for this costly disorder, there are proven management strategies to lessen the impact of toxicosis. A new professional guide, Tall Fescue Toxicosis and Management is now available to livestock producers and land managers who want to better understand and control ...

  • Machinery “Palesse” at the exhibition “Techagro 2016”

    At the International exhibition of agricultural machinery “TECHAGRO-2016”, which took place in April in Brno (Czech Republic) holding “GOMSELMASH” for the first time during an exhibition arrangements of this project presented highly-productive forage harvesting complex “PALESSE FS8060”. Also the company presented grain harvesting combine “PALESSE ...


    By Gomselmash

  • Chromatin Announces Relief Program for Sorghum Growers Hit by the Kansas-Oklahoma Fire

    Chromatin, Inc., is moving quickly to assist farmers and ranchers affected by the Anderson Creek Fire that destroyed 400,000 acres. Led by Chromatin’s Sorghum Partners® brand, this initiative will provide farmers with seed that can rapidly produce feed for livestock and ground cover to prevent soil erosion. “We are saddened to hear of the tragic damage caused by this fire to ...


    By Chromatin, Inc.

  • Mow Your Pastures to See Greener Grass, and Other Pasture Improvement Tips

    Livestock producers who want a simple way to improve their pastures may want to consider using a tool similar to what most homeowners use to keep their neighbors happy — a mower, only bigger. Not only does mowing keep pastures looking nice, it also helps remove weeds, said Chris Penrose, an Ohio State University Extension educator. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of the College of Food, ...


    By Ohio State University

  • California’s Prop 65 and Public Health Concerns from Maneb

    In 1986, California voters approved an initiative to address increasing concerns about exposure to toxic chemicals. That initiative, the Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986, is better known by its original name of Proposition 65.    Proposition 65 requires businesses to notify Californians about significant amounts of chemicals in the products they purchase, in their ...


    By EMSL Analytical, Inc.

  • UF/IFAS Extension helps North Florida dairies move into grazing using a perennial grass

    North Florida dairy farmers are increasing their use of grazing and hay areas thanks to the hybrid, perennial, warm-season Tifton 85 bermudagrass, tested extensively by the University of Florida’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences’ Forage Extension and Research programs. Yoana Newman, an Extension Forage Specialist with the Agronomy department, described Tifton 85 as a ...

  • Sub-Saharan Africa news in brief

    Namibia urged to invest more in science and technology Increasing investment in science and technology could help Namibia reduce poverty, hunger, disease and unemployment, said former president Sam Nujoma last week. Launching the country"s National Science, Engineering and Technology Week, Nujoma said: "If Namibia has to turn around the slow rate of economic development, which is ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • The Livestock Event 2014: More Livestock + New Technical

    The Livestock Event, the UK’s leading livestock trade show held at The NEC, Birmingham on 2 and 3 July and organised by RABDF Events, will be welcoming a record 400 livestock entries and over 450 trade exhibitors, providing the most comprehensive offering of any UK event, all under one roof in the most easily accessed location. Farmers can drive straight in off the motorway network to free ...

  • Amisy Self-propelled Corn Harvester

    Amisy Self-propelled Corn Harvester The economical use of original high-quality cutting components and wear parts can be considerably improved by proper ...


    By Amisy Farming Machinery

  • Rooftop gardens could grow three quarters of city’s vegetables

    Rooftop gardens in cities could provide more than three quarters of the vegetables consumed in them, a case study from Bologna, Italy, suggests. If all suitable flat roof space was used for urban agriculture, rooftop gardens in the city could supply around 12 500 tons of vegetables a year whilst also providing a range of ecosystem services, the researchers say. Any unused roof space in a city ...

  • Machine of the Year award to Valtra´s new T Series

    The brand new Valtra T Series was selected the winner of the Machine of the Year award in the 180-280hp category at the SIMA Show 2015. The selection was made by 19 independent agricultural journalists from European trade magazines of 17 countries. Machine of the Year is one of the most prestigious recognitions for tractors with innovative technology and total performance. Valtra launched ...

  • Silage harvesting partly responsible for decline in skylarks

    Farmland birds like skylarks are attracted to nest in agricultural grassland, but repeated harvesting for silage causes most nests to fail. This study showed that skylark breeding success in silage was too low to sustain local populations. The researchers say that grass silage is a hostile environment for breeding skylarks and conservation efforts should focus on making other parts of the ...

  • Waste incinerator impacts monitored via milk and vegetable quality

    Emissions from well-regulated household waste incinerators do not reduce the quality of vegetables and milk produced nearby, a Dutch study suggests. Researchers found that levels of certain contaminants were similar whether vegetables and milk came from the area surrounding three incinerators, or from elsewhere in the Netherlands. They say biomonitoring programmes could offer a way to increase ...

  • Can new biopesticide protect crops without harming honeybees?

    A potential new biopesticide, made of spider venom and snowdrop proteins, kills agricultural pests but shows minimal toxicity to honeybees, new research suggests. Learning and memory of honeybees exposed to the biopesticide were not affected, even at doses higher than they would normally encounter in the environment. Insect pollination is vital for food production; however, there are concerns ...

  • Turfgrass that wears down and springs back up

    Kentucky bluegrass, a turfgrass frequently grown on sports fields, is more tolerant to wear during the spring compared to other seasons, and shows better recovery during spring, according to research from Rutgers University. The study also identified which varieties of bluegrass showed the most wear tolerance. Researchers Bradley Park, T.J. Lawson, Hiranthi Samaranayake, and James A. Murphy, from ...

  • Manure `smells like money` as energy costs rise

    With energy prices driving the cost of agricultural inputs up, nutrient-rich manure is getting another look. 'Calls to Extension offices from people looking for manure and manure compost have increased in recent months,' says Tommy Bass, Montana State University Extension livestock environment associate specialist. Bass said that this shift in perception is good for water quality, too. 'As manure ...

  • Keeping tabs on the next generation of transgenic crops

    A team of government and university crop scientists from across Canada has developed a scientific framework for monitoring the release of second-generation genetically modified crops. The framework is designed to assess the risks of novel genes entering wild populations. First-generation genetically modified (GM)/transgenic crops with novel traits have been grown in a number of countries since ...

  • Colorado Leopold Conservation Award Recipient Announced

    Sand County Foundation, the Colorado Cattlemen’s Association, the Colorado Cattlemen’s Agricultural Land Trust, and ...


    By PRWeb

  • The Public University of Navarre is participating in a European project on sustainable management and reduction of greenhouse gas emissions in irrigation farming

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere is used by plants to build their tissues, and when plants die, the carbon can reach the soil in which they grow. If the way of cultivating the earth can be optimized to prevent some of this carbon from returning to the atmosphere in the form of CO2, it will be contributing towards cutting greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, one of the main causes of global ...

  • Maize seedlings predict drought Tolerance

    Scientists have developed a new method for measuring drought tolerance in maize. By comparing the shoot-to-root ratio in seedlings stressed by low water, scientists can predict whether a plant has the right mix of genes for adapting to drought conditions. The ideal drought-resistant maize should have a higher ratio of root surface area compared to leaves and stems. Developing enough adult plants ...

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