forage variety News

  • Method to differentiate open pollinated varieties of maize developed

    Open pollinated varieties of maize are going to be easier to distinguish from each other, thanks to scientists at the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT) in Africa and Mexico. They have developed a new technique to differentiate the genes of one open pollinated variety from another, particularly important to African farmers, most of whom do not plant hybrid varieties. The ...

  • Making more from forage: Bishop Burton farm walk 18 Feb

    Realising the true value of forage this coming season will come under the microscope at a farm walk staged at Bishop Burton College, Beverley on Wednesday 18 February. Organised by the Royal Association of British Dairy Farmers and animal nutrition company, Volac, the event will focus on how to optimise the value of silage swards – what varieties to grow and how, when to cut, how to clamp ...

  • Grass-based farming systems: Soil conservation and environmental quality

    Crop selection and sequence can have a profound effect on the environment and on farm profitability. According to Chapter 7, “Grass-based Farming Systems: Soil Conservation and Environmental Quality” by Jeremy W. Singer, Alan J. Franzluebbers, and Douglas L. Karlen in the book, Grassland Quietness and Strength for a New American Agriculture, the basis for a productive agricultural system should ...

  • Tall fescue toxicosis and management

    Tall fescue toxicosis is one of the most devastating problems facing forage-livestock agriculture. While there is currently no cure for this costly disorder, there are proven management strategies to lessen the impact of toxicosis. A new professional guide, Tall Fescue Toxicosis and Management is now available to livestock producers and land managers who want to better understand and control ...

  • Introducing Vermeer™ Net and Rebel™ Net from Vermeer Corporation

    Today, Vermeer Corporation introduces the newest partner in its forage product line with Vermeer brand netwrap – Vermeer™ Net, available for 4’ and 5’ balers, and Rebel™ net, designed for Vermeer Rebel® Series Balers. Featuring superior net strength for ultimate bale protection, Vermeer brand netwrap is produced in a unique green, black and white color scheme for ...


    By Vermeer

  • Two new limpograss cultivars released for select Florida cattlemen

    The University of Florida, in partnership with Florida Foundation Seed Producers Inc., has released two new limpograss cultivars so ranchers can increase the forage variety they feed their cattle. Florida beef cattle producers use limpograss, a warm-season, perennial grass for its high digestibility, cool-season growth and tolerance to poorly drained soils. The new lines, limpograsses 4F and 10, ...

  • Zaad and Chromatin Agree to Produce and Distribute Sorghum Seed in Africa

    Chromatin, Inc. and Zaad Holdings LTD, announced today that they have entered into a long-term alliance to produce and distribute planting seed for grain and forage sorghum throughout the African continent. Zaad, a vertically integrated agriculture company, distributes seed to Africa’s growers through a network of subsidiaries and established brands. Chromatin, an agriculture technology ...


    By Chromatin, Inc.

  • Sub-Saharan Africa news in brief

    Namibia urged to invest more in science and technology Increasing investment in science and technology could help Namibia reduce poverty, hunger, disease and unemployment, said former president Sam Nujoma last week. Launching the country"s National Science, Engineering and Technology Week, Nujoma said: "If Namibia has to turn around the slow rate of economic development, which is ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Scientists find four-leaf clover gene

    Ending a period of “bad luck” for clover researchers, scientists report finding the gene that turns ordinary three-leaf clovers into the coveted four-leaf types. Masked by the three-leaf gene and strongly influenced by environmental condition, molecular markers now make it possible to detect the presence of the gene for four-leaves and for breeders to work with it. The results of the ...

  • Crop breeding gets boost from sweet potatoes

    In Uganda, the sweet potato is a major staple crop. Behind China and Nigeria, Uganda produces the most sweet potatoes in the world. Nationwide, families grow the crop to feed themselves, their livestock and to use as a source of income. Small scale agricultural operations use a large number of sweet potato varieties in their planting. These varieties are steadily being lost due to weevils, sweet ...

  • Peanuts: more genetically diverse than expected

    Virginia-type peanuts, the big ones sold in the shell or used in cocktail nut mixes, are more genetically variable than previously assumed, according to a new study from North Carolina State University. Before now, cultivated peanuts showed very little variability for molecular markers, leading some to conclude that there was virtually no genetic variation in the species. However, anyone who has ...

  • Cactus could feed East African livestock, say scientists

    A succulent, wild-growing cactus that has been widely dismissed as a noxious weed could sustain African livestock during drought, according to scientists at the Kenya Agricultural Research Institute (KARI). A paper by John Kang"ara and Josiah Gitari, animal nutritionists at KARI, concludes that Opuntia species — the prickly pear or paddle cacti — have extreme tolerance to drought and ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • The sustainability of livestock grazing land

    European biodiversity significantly depends on the availability of habitat that is not intensely farmed. It is therefore important to identify grazing systems for livestock that require relatively little land management. Sheep grazing and reindeer herding are examples of such 'large-scale low-input grazing systems' (LSGS). However, they must be economically viable as well as environmentally ...

  • Turfgrass that wears down and springs back up

    Kentucky bluegrass, a turfgrass frequently grown on sports fields, is more tolerant to wear during the spring compared to other seasons, and shows better recovery during spring, according to research from Rutgers University. The study also identified which varieties of bluegrass showed the most wear tolerance. Researchers Bradley Park, T.J. Lawson, Hiranthi Samaranayake, and James A. Murphy, from ...

  • Lima beans domesticated twice

    Lima beans were domesticated at least twice, according to a new genetic diversity study by Colombian scientists. Big seeded varieties known as “Big Lima” were domesticated in the Andean Mountains, while small seeded “Sieva” and “Potato” varieties originated in central-western Mexico. The researchers also discovered a “founder effect,” which is a ...

  • Using genetic mapping to save wheat production

    Stem rust disease has the potential to devastate wheat production worldwide. In the 1950s, large epidemics spread across North America and through other parts of the world. Developing a stem rust resistant gene stopped the spread of the disease. In 1999, a new race of stem rust was discovered in Uganda and identified as Ug99. Previously developed stem rust resistant genes are no longer effective ...

  • Transitioning to organic farming

    As the organic food trend continues to grow; more farmers are converting from conventional agriculture to organic production. One of the fastest growing markets in the U.S. is the production of organic milk. The growth of this industry has prompted many farmers to transition their land to organic feed grain production. With transition on the rise, it is necessary for these farmers to have ...

  • Does pasture irrigation increase groundwater contamination?

    Concern about microbial contamination of groundwater from foraging dairy cows has increased as spray irrigation practices in New Zealand have increased over the years. Bacteria capable of living in both animals and humans are commonly found in cow manure. Addressing the lack of research on the topic, a team of New Zealand researchers studied the transport of microbes from two spray irrigated ...

  • Syngenta to acquire Lantmännen’s winter wheat and winter oilseed rape businesses in Germany and Poland

    Syngenta announced today an agreement to acquire the German and Polish winter wheat and winter oilseed rape (WOSR) breeding and business operations of Lantmännen, the Swedish food, energy and agriculture group. Syngenta will gain access to high-quality germplasm, a seeds pipeline and commercial varieties which complement the company's portfolio in two of Europe's most important crops. ...


    By Syngenta

  • Drought Tolerant rice in development

    Rice production faces the threat of a growing worldwide water scarcity. Approximately, 75% of the world’s rice is grown in flooded, lowland conditions. Lowland rice crops either rely on irrigation or rain water to provide adequate growing conditions. The food security of millions of people depends on the availability of water.   Scientists at the International Rice Research Institute ...

Need help finding the right suppliers? Try XPRT Sourcing. Let the XPRTs do the work for you