forest data News

  • Ten African countries unite to protect rainforests

    Ten central African countries have come together to protect the Congo Basin rainforest — the world's second largest rainforest — from severe deforestation, through implementing improved national forest monitoring systems and boosting regional cooperation. The 18-month project, launched on 26 July, ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Deforestation`s double blow: carbon emissions and biodiversity loss

    Deforestation increases CO2 emissions, as forests are subjected to 'slash and burn' clearing to make way for agricultural land. In China, for example, vast areas of rainforest are being cleared to make way for rubber plantations. Using satellite images, researchers have assessed that the average loss of natural forest between 1976 and 2003 is 13,722 hectares per year. In total, this caused a loss ...

  • New project will collect vital knowledge about tree genetic resources to support conservation

    A workshop in Nairobi, Kenya last week saw representatives from 43 African nations participate in an ambitious project to document the status of the world's forest genetic resources; a vital step in conserving and sustainably managing forests. "Forest genetic resources are unique and irreplaceable; from plants that provide timber and essential nourishment when crops fail to those that may be ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Groundbreaking study finds the `hotspots` most responsible for deforestation

    A new collaborative study by WRI and other researchers finds that much of the world’s deforestation is isolated in a handful of “hotspots,” not spread out over many nations and many locations. In fact, this study showed that over half the world’s deforestation (in this study only clear-cut are monitored) is happening in just two locations: 48% is occurring in Brazil, with another 13% concentrated ...

  • Increased concerns over fluvial carbon losses from deforested tropical peatlands

    Over 20% more carbon could be being released by tropical peatlands than previously estimated, a new study suggests. The research highlights the large quantities of carbon lost to rivers from deforested and degraded peatlands in Indonesia, in addition to carbon released as CO2 gas. Peatlands are an important carbon store and the peat swamp forests of south-east Asia have experienced excessive ...

  • Woodlands revival adds new piece to carbon cycle puzzle

    Despite continuing concern about the fate of iconic rainforests, new research shows that the world’s forests have stored away an extra 4 billion tonnes of carbon in the last dozen years and the total amount of woodland has increased worldwide since 2003. The encouraging news comes from Australian scientists, who report ...


    By Climate News Network

  • Dynamax`s dynagage flow32-1K sap flow system and dynagage sensors press release

    The Dynagage Flow32-1K Sap Flow system and Dynagage sensors have been servicing research plant scientists throughout the world for over 10 years. The Flow32-1K software makes working with Flow32-1K sap flow systems easier than ever before with built-in algorithms for efficient and faster data analysis. New powerful functions include auto-zero and sensor status built into the data logger program. ...


    By Dynamax Inc

  • An inside look at Latin America’s Illegal Logging – Part One

    This post was co-authored with Eduardo Arenas Hernández Jr. and Ana Domínguez, who work for Reforestamos Mexico. This is the first post in a two-part series on illegal logging in Latin America, with key insights coming from the Forest Legality Alliance’s recent event, “ ...

  • 2 New tools can cut deforestation and support sustainable palm oil in Indonesia

    Can the world have its palm oil and forests, too This is an issue that my colleague and I discussed a while back. I am pleased to say that we recently moved a step toward ensuring that the answer is “yes.” At the 10th Annual Meeting of the ...

  • Two new online mapping applications launched to support sustainable palm oil in Indonesia

    Forest Cover Analyzer and Suitability Mapper to be used by business and government to reduce deforestation The World Resources Institute (WRI) is launching two powerful online mapping applications that offer unprecedented capabilities to support industry and government efforts to achieve more sustainable palm oil production ...

  • Wildfire risk index: highlights human causes

    A new risk index allows areas to be identified which are most at risk of wildfires as a result of human activity. Understanding which factors affect the risk of humans causing wildfires could help inform strategies for fire prevention. Between 1980 and 2004, there were approximately 380,000 fires in Spain. The majority of these were caused by people, whether unintentionally or not. As well as ...

  • Updated guide helps businesses source sustainable wood and paper products

    Forests are vitally important for the global environment, economy, and population. The forest sector employs 13.7 million workers and contributes to about 1 percent of the global GDP. Plus, an ...

  • Global ReLeaf marks 20th anniversary at KWWF

    The Kirtland"s Warbler Wildlife Festival (KWWF) has drawn thousands of birding and nature enthusiasts to its annual "celebration of nature" held on the third Saturday in May at Kirtland Community College"s main campus near Roscommon. This year, the festival will also help celebrate a very important anniversary, as well as a gracious donation that will benefit the area"s wildlife for years to ...

  • Mapping tool to support sustainable palm-oil farming

    Two online mapping applications, designed to support sustainable production in Indonesia by helping to identify degraded lands that could be used to produce palm oil, were launched by the US-based World Resources Institute (WRI) last month (30 October). The Forest Cover Analyzer and Suitability Mapper aim to support government efforts to reduce ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Rise in CO2 could restrict growing days for crops

    The positive consequences of climate change may not be so positive. Although plants in the colder regions are expected to thrive as average global temperatures rise, even this benefit could be limited. Some tropical regions could lose up to 200 growing days a year, and more than two billion rural people could see their hopes wither on the vine or in the field. Even in temperate zones, there will ...


    By Climate News Network

  • Satellites help map soil carbon flux

    Changes in soil carbon occur with changes in land management. Scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Tennessee investigated quantifying soil carbon changes over large regions. They integrated remote sensing products with a national carbon accounting framework in a project funded by the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Office of Earth Science. Results ...

  • Deforestation reduces rainfall in tropics, says study

    Large-scale deforestation in tropical rainforests can dramatically reduce rainfall rates both locally and thousands of kilometres away, according to a study published in Nature yesterday (5 September). This could have a potentially devastating impact on communities living in or close to the Amazon and Congo rainforests. This drop occurs because ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Cross-Section Averaged Spray Characteristics

    A new ASTM International standard, E2872, Guide for Determining Cross-Section Averaged Characteristics of a Spray Using Laser-Diffraction Instruments in a Wind Tunnel Apparatus, will be used to guide characterization of nozzles and atomizers using laser diffraction instruments. E2872 is primarily applicable to aerial agricultural spraying, ...


    By ASTM International

  • Illegal gold mining`s wasteland

    A decade of illegal gold mining has transformed large areas of virgin Peruvian rainforest into pocked, denuded, mercury-poisoned wastelands. Excavations to separate gold flecks from tons of earth have left holes big enough to swallow a half-dozen buses. Mercury, a neurotoxin used to bind the gold, pervades the local food chain, reaching humans through the fish they eat. The ruined lands scar the ...


    By Associated Press

  • Amazon rainforest is storing less and less carbon

    A team of 90 researchers has discovered that the uptake of carbon in the Amazon rainforest is decreasing over the long term. This is due to a recent decline in the growth rate of trees, while tree mortality has increased. As a result, carbon is stored in the rainforest for a shorter period. A possible cause of the shorter lifespan of trees could be greater variation in climate. This was one of ...

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