fruit pathogen News

  • Ambrosia beetle spreads dangerous avocado pathogen

    As the laurel wilt pathogen casts a cloud over the $100-million-a-year Florida avocado industry, University of Florida researchers continue to look for clues to prevent the pathogen from spreading. The main culprit has been the redbay ambrosia beetle, which has infected millions of native redbay and swampbay trees with the laurel wilt pathogen, but it is rarely seen in commercial avocado ...


    By University of Florida

  • New method may help detect avocado pathogen earlier

    University of Florida researchers have found an algorithm to help them detect laurel wilt, the deadly pathogen that threatens Florida’s $100 million-a-year avocado industry. Reza Ehsani, an associate professor of agricultural and biological engineering, said the algorithm finds laurel wilt-infected avocado trees before symptoms are visible to the naked eye. About 500 growers produce ...

  • Changes in wildlife migration could alter disease risk

    The risk of animals passing diseases to humans could increase in some cases, but decrease in others, as people encroach on and disrupt wildlife migration paths, according to a review in Science. Climate change is also affecting migration patterns, and the review says there is an urgent need for research on how changes in habitat and climate will affect disease in migratory animals, to predict ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Management Strategies to Reduce Catfacing in Peaches

    For producers of peaches and other orchard-grown produce, managing the orchard floor can present challenges. Unwelcome vegetation on the orchard floor competes with trees for water and nutrients reducing tree growth and productivity, and can be a host for pathogens and insect pests. Utilizing best practices for irrigation and vegetation management in the orchard helps growers to optimize tree ...

  • Measures to prevent entry of citrus pests ‘are appropriate’

    Existing measures are effective at protecting the EU from two serious diseases that attack citrus plants. That is the conclusion of risk assessments carried out by EFSA on Phyllosticta citricarpa, the organism which causes citrus black spot, and Xanthomonas citri, which causes citrus canker. Both pathogens present a ...

  • The problem expands for avocado growers: 9 beetle species carry deadly fungus

    Many people love their avocados – not to mention guacamole dip. So it was bad enough when scientists said a beetle was ravaging avocado trees in South Florida. Then scientists found out that the redbay ambrosia beetle — originally determined to transmit laurel wilt — is rare in avocado groves but that six other beetle species could carry the laurel wilt pathogen. That’s ...

  • Managing Late Blight of Potatoes and Tomatoes

    Late blight is one of the most serious diseases of potatoes and tomatoes worldwide, resulting in significant yield and quality losses annually. In Alberta, late blight occurs infrequently, but can have devastating impacts in the years when it reaches epidemic levels.  “This disease is caused by a fungal pathogen called Phytophthora infestans,” says Robert Spencer, ...

  • Renewed cooperation between CIHEAM and FAO

    The International Centre for Advanced Mediterranean Agronomic Studies (CIHEAM) based in Paris and FAO will strengthen their cooperation under an agreement signed at FAO's Rome headquarters this week. The Agreement of Cooperation was signed by Bertrand Hervieu, Secretary General of CIHEAM and Hervé Lejeune, FAO Assistant Director-General and Directeur de Cabinet. In it, both organizations agreed ...

  • UF researchers find genetic cause for citrus canker, putting them a step closer to a cure

    Researchers from the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences at the University of Florida are closer to finding a possible cure for citrus canker after identifying a gene that makes citrus trees susceptible to the bacterial pathogen. Citrus canker, which causes pustules on fruit, leaves and twigs, is a highly contagious plant disease and spreads rapidly over short distances. Wind-driven rain, ...


    By University of Florida

  • Agdia Releases New Molecular Test for Avocado Sunblotch Viroid

    Agdia, Inc. (Elkhart, IN) has commercialized a Nucleic Acid Hybridization Assay for Avocado sunblotch viroid (ASBVd). ASBVd is found in avocado growing regions worldwide.  Trees that are infected with ASBVd can result in a loss of yield and / or production of unmarketable fruit.  However, symptoms are not always present making pro-active testing a critical disease control ...


    By Agdia Incorporated

  • USDA Makes $5 Million in Farm Bill Support for National Clean Plant Network Available

    U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Secretary Tom Vilsack announced today the allocation of $5 million to support 19 projects under the National Clean Plant Network (NCPN) funded under the Agriculture Act of 2014 (the 2014 Farm Bill). NCPN-funded facilities provide high-quality propagative plant material that is free of plant pathogens and pests that can otherwise cause economic losses to the ...

  • Testing new biological plant protection products for effectiveness and practical feasibility

    A naturally occurring fungus codenamed ‘H39’ might be the long-sought biological defence against the dreaded apple scab. “This fungus has not only been tested for its ability to fight the pathogen. The new Select BioControl method was also used to immediately assess the practical feasibility of deploying it as a commercial product,” says Dr Jürgen Köhl of ...

  • UF/IFAS researchers use steam to treat citrus greening

    University of Florida researchers are turning to the old-fashioned method of steaming to help treat citrus greening, a disease devastating citrus trees throughout Florida. Reza Ehsani and his UF Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences colleagues are tenting and then enveloping trees in steam that is 136 degrees Fahrenheit for about 30 seconds in an attempt to kill the ...

  • European trees planted in China to identify potentially invasive species in our forests

    Most of the exotic species which attack plants in Europe now come from Asia. INRA scientists, together with teams from the Academy of Sciences in Beijing and the Forestry University in Zhejiang have devised a new method for detecting potential invaders in their region of origin before they are introduced on another continent. European sentinel trees were planted in China for four years, and ...

  • USDA awards more than US$28m in specialty crop research

    Agriculture Secretary Ed Schafer has announced that USDA awarded more than $28 million through the Specialty Crop Research Initiative (SCRI) to solve critical specialty crop agriculture issues, address priorities and solve problems through multifunctional research and extension. The Specialty Crop Research Initiative was established by the 2008 Farm Bill to support the specialty crop industry by ...

  • Innovative products and new approaches to promote sustainability in horticulture

    At the 29th International Horticultural Congress which takes place from August 17 to 22 in Brisbane, Australia, Bayer CropScience is showcasing its latest innovations and novel approaches for sustainable horticulture production. Under the theme ‘Innovating Together for Sustainable Horticulture’ experts from the company present recent product novelties and new solutions that underline ...


    By Bayer CropScience AG

  • Agriculture Secretary Announces $3 Million for a New Program to Improve Pollinator Health

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) will provide close to $3 million in technical and financial assistance for interested farmers and ranchers to help improve the health of bees, which play an important role in crop production. The funding is a focused investment to improve pollinator health and will be targeted in five Midwestern states, ...

  • Grafting helps pepper plants deal with drought

    Joining a high-yield pepper plant sapling to the roots of a strong and resistant variety could help pepper farmers cope with lower rainfall, a study has found. An experiment using the technique of merging two plants, known as grafting, resulted in higher fruit yield during periods of less rain. Plants also grew much better in salty soil, a by-product of drought, the researchers ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • USDA Announces $22 Million Available for Research to Combat Citrus Greening

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) today announced the availability of $22 million in grants to help citrus producers fight Huanglongbing (HLB), commonly known as citrus greening disease. This funding is available through the Specialty Crop Research Initiative (SCRI) Citrus Disease Research and Extension Program (CDRE), which was authorized by the 2014 Farm Bill and is administered by ...

  • Where have all the flowers gone?

    Global food production may be approaching another major crisis. Crops around the world are pollinated by honeybees, but bee populations are dying off rapidly due to excessive use of pesticides and other environmental factors. The threat of food production losses is becoming painfully apparent, and the economic, social and environmental costs could be staggering. This growing threat to the global ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

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