gm crop variety News

  • GM maize contaminates non-GM crops in Uruguay

    Contamination of traditional maize crops planted near genetically modified (GM) maize fields may be common in Uruguay, where the cultivation of GM maize has been permitted since 2003, scientists have said. A study published in Environmental Biosafety Research (25 March) has found GM seedlings in three ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Overcoming obstacles to GM crop adoption

    This policy brief, published by the UK's Parliamentary Office of Science and Technology (POST), examines the potential benefits and challenges of using genetically modified (GM) crops for agricultural development in the developing world, and highlights ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Can GM crops feed the hungry?

    Golden Rice burst into the public imagination a decade ago, in the form of a cover article in Time magazine that claimed the genetically modified (GM) rice could 'save a million kids a year'. The rice gets its golden hue from an excess of beta carotene, a precursor to vitamin A that could help half a million children who go blind each year from an often-fatal vitamin A deficiency. But ten years ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Flexible management better for coexistence of GM and non-GM crops

    Flexible measures, such as pollen barriers, for regulating the cultivation of GM and non-GM crops in the same landscape are more likely to encourage the adoption of GM technology by farmers than rigid measures, such as isolation distances, according to a recent study. The EU has recommended guidelines1 for developing national strategies by all Member States for the coexistence of genetically ...

  • GM crops could reduce need for herbicides

    Analysis of large-scale European field trial data reveals that lower quantities of herbicides are applied to crops genetically modified for herbicide-resistance compared with conventionally grown crops. However, the data also suggest that biodiversity may be reduced if genetically modified (GM) crops are grown widely. Transgenic crops are currently grown in 22 countries across the world, ...

  • Uganda starts `historic` trials on GM staple crops

    Ugandan researchers will carry out a series of field trials on some of the major food crops that have been genetically modified (GM), following several recent approvals by the Uganda National Biosafety Committee, despite a lack of clear legislation on commercialising any such products within the country. They will seek to develop both transgenic and conventional maize varieties tolerant to ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Crossbreeding GM crops may increase fitness of wild relatives

    A new study has investigated the effects of interbreeding a genetically modified squash crop with its wild relative. The findings demonstrate that it could cause wild or weedy relatives to become more resistant to disease. Genetic Modification (GM) can be used to develop crops that are resistant to specific pests. However, there are concerns that if a GM crop interbreeds with its wild or weedy ...

  • Europe rejects GM crops as new report highlights 20 years of failures

    All 19 government requests for bans of GM crop cultivation have gone unchallenged by biotech companies, pathing the way for two thirds of the EU’s farmland and population to remain GM-free [1]. The growing opposition to GM crops coincides with a new Greenpeace report reviewing evidence of GM environmental risks, market failures, and increased pesticide use [2]. Greenpeace EU ...


    By Greenpeace International

  • Peru relaxes GM rules … for now

    After nine years of discussions, Peru's government has passed an agricultural biosafety regulation intended to promote biotechnological research and help the country's researchers catch up with other Latin American nations. The Biosafety Rules for the Agriculture or Forestry Sectors will regulate the research, ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Pakistan debates GM cotton’s success

    Pakistan is beset by conflicting claims over the success of genetically modified (GM) cotton, now grown in over 90 per cent of the 2.5 million hectares under cotton. The GM cotton variety — also called Bt cotton because it contains a gene taken from the soil bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis that resists ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • GM rapeseed could reduce fertiliser usage

    Nitrogen fertiliser used in crop production is a substantial source of environmental pollution, contributing to around one third of the total greenhouse gas emissions from the world's agricultural sector. Recent research on a genetically modified (GM) variety of rapeseed, which has been made more nitrogen-efficient, suggests that yields comparable with conventional varieties can be obtained using ...

  • Mexican trial of GM maize stirs debate

    Mexico has authorised a field trial of genetically modified (GM) maize that could lead directly to commercialisation of the crop, sparking debate about the effects on the country's unique maize biodiversity. Although Mexico already commercially grows some ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • GM seeds can remain in fields longer than previously thought

    Despite management practices designed to reduce the risk of genetically modified (GM) volunteer plants setting seed, new research shows that rogue GM plants occur in fields which were planted with GM oil seed rape 10 years earlier. Volunteer plants (plants that have not been planted deliberately) arise because some seed is spilled during harvest and remains in the field to germinate in a ...

  • Monsanto to carry out new GM maize trials in Pakistan

    The multinational agriculture firm Monsanto has been given government permission to conduct a third round of trials of its genetically modified ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Genetically Modified Crop Industry Continues to Expand

    One of the familiar narratives for the promotion of genetically modified (GM) crops is that they have the potential to alleviate poverty and hunger. But the real impacts of GM crops deserve closer assessment, writes Wanqing Zhou, research associate in the Food and Agriculture Program at the Worldwatch Institute, in the Institute’s latest Vital Signs Online article ...


    By Worldwatch Institute

  • The dire need to support ‘orphan crop’ research

    In spite of debate over its definition, the term ‘orphan crops’ refers to crops that are under-researched and underfunded due to their limited importance in the global market. These include cereals, legumes, vegetables, root crops, fodder crops, oil crops, fibre crops and ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Second Generation Biodiesel Crops Topic of International Meeting

    India. – CJP – the advanced biofuel center will host a meeting in India  on opportunities and available technology for "second generation" Biodiesel crops crops such as Jatropha, Jojoba, Castor bean, Pongamia, Moringa , Simarouba and Algae. The 7th Global Jatropha World 3.0 ...


    By Advanced Biofuel Center

  • US–Nepal hybrid maize project runs into criticism

    Uncertainty hangs over a proposed partnership between US and Nepalese scientists to promote hybrid maize in the Himalayan country, after the project sparked local concerns over the potential loss of traditional local varieties and weak biotechnology regulation. The pilot project of the US Agency for ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Nigerian biosafety bill may fail, say scientists

    Supporters of genetically modified (GM) crop technology fear that their four-year effort to get a biosafety bill enacted in Nigeria may have been in vain if the country's upper house fails to pass it before its tenure ends next month (29 May). The 2007 bill, passed by the country's lower chamber last July, is ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Syngenta`s Mary-Dell Chilton named 2013 World Food Prize laureate

    U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry today presided over a ceremony at which distinguished Syngentascientist Mary-Dell Chilton, Ph.D., was named a laureate of the prestigious 2013 World Food Prize. The prize is the foremost international award recognizing individuals who have enhanced human development by improving the quality, quantity or availability of food in the ...


    By Syngenta

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