grain analyser News

  • EMSL Analytical announces expanded mycotoxin analyses

    Superior detection limits offered by advanced LC-MS technologies.EMSL Analytical is pleased to announce expanded mycotoxin analyses. Mycotoxins are toxins produced by fungi under various environmental conditions. These toxins have been shown to have a detrimental effect on humans and other animals. Moisture, temperature, substrate type, and interactions with other microbes can all affect ...


  • Perten presents Near-infrared Grain Analyzer for Farm Use

    Near-infrared (NIR) grain testing has been a fixture at large elevators and grain processors for years. An on farm grain analyzer has been desirable for some time. The demands on such an instrument are high, however, and must balance many requirements. It must be rugged and robust. It must be portable to tote around the field. It must be simple to operate, but sophisticated enough to provide ...

  • An Australian first for lupin genome project

    Being conducted in collaboration with the Centre for Food and Genomic Medicine (CFGM) in Perth, WA, the three-year, $1.5 million project will enable researchers and breeders to accelerate lupin crop improvements such as drought tolerance, disease resistance and optimal flowering time. The research team will build upon established resources and employ powerful next-generation sequencing ...

  • Will large amounts of soil carbon be released to the atmosphere if grasslands are converted to energy crops?

    Grasslands in the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) in the United States may be increasingly converted to growing bioenergy grain crops. Questions abound regarding the fate of carbon sequestered in the soil during the CRP program by perennial grasses if the land is converted to grain crop production and the potential effectiveness of no-till production systems to conserve the sequestered soil ...

  • Understanding land use change and US ethanol expansion

    Understanding changes in land use—such as deforestation, urbanization and agriculture expansion—is important if society is to properly address the challenges of climate change, utilization of natural resources, and energy production and consumption. However, the intensifying debate over potential indirect land use changes resulting from biofuels expansion is nebulous at best. At worst, it is ...

  • High temperatures `make wheat old before its time`

    Global warming can cause premature ageing in wheat, according to computer modelling studies of the crop's response to growing conditions in northern India. The effects of warming on wheat growth and grain size are far worse than previous crop models indicated, David Lobell, assistant professor in ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Dosage of fertiliser helps to enhance quality of wheat

    Breaking up the dosage of fertilizer into three phases of application enhances the quality of wheat and limits its negative effects on the environment. This is the conclusion of the PhD thesis of University of the Basque Country (UPV-EHU) researcher, Teresa Fuentes Mendizábal, presented at the Faculty of Science and Technology. Wheat yields have increased over the decades, more concretely during ...


    By AlphaGalileo Ltd

  • Night warming threatens rice output in Asia

    Hotter nights arising from climate change will put a brake on the rise in rice production in Asia over the coming decades, with the effect worsening as the century progresses, scientists said yesterday (9 August). The first study to use 'real-world' data from farmer-managed rice farms has shown that, while hotter days may boost productivity, hotter nights more than compensate by reducing it. ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Despite weather extremes EU-27 cereal production in 2013 expected to be higher than last year

    This year total cereal production in the EU-271 is forecast to be well above 2012 levels and above the average of the past five years. This agricultural year has so far been marked by an unusually prolonged winter for western and central Europe and heavy rainfall in May and June. However, the impact of poor weather on crops in some areas of the EU has been offset in other areas; for example, the ...


    By European Commission

  • Impact of volunteer GM maize on conventional crops is low

    A recent EU-supported study has analysed the development of volunteer or 'rogue' GM (genetically modified) maize plants in a conventional crop field. It finds that their numbers are low and do not exceed the EU's threshold of 0.9 per cent for incidental GM content. Scientific data on the role of maize volunteers on cross-pollination is limited. The most detailed studies have been conducted in ...

  • ASTM A266 / A266M - 11 standard specification for carbon steel forgings for pressure vessel components

    This specification covers four grades of carbon steel forgings for boiler and pressure vessel components, and associated equipment. Materials shall be manufactured by melting process and hot-worked forging. Heat and product analyses shall be performed wherein forgings shall conform to chemical requirements for carbon, manganese, phosphorus, ...


    By ASTM International

  • Agroforestry can fix Pakistan’s depleting tree cover

    Using a mix of trees and crop species can help rejuvenate Pakistan's  deteriorating forests, a study reported. The study is based on physical and chemical analyses of 400 soil samples, collected during a survey of farms and plantations to compare the four agro-ecological zones of the Punjab province. Results of the findings published in the African Science Journal of Environmental Sciences ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Compost made by worms from livestock manure yields benefits when applied to maize

    Vermicomposting livestock manure with maize can increase agricultural benefit by 304%, shows a new study. The combination of increased crop yield and the additional earthworms produced as a result of the process led to a substantial increase in output compared to a traditional composting system. As intensive agriculture and livestock production both increase, unique problems emerge. Heavy use of ...

  • Arsenic in food chain raises health concerns in Bangladesh

    A high concentration of arsenic in the water and soil is infiltrating Bangladesh's food chain, raising serious health concerns for millions of residents, specialists warn. The acceptable level of arsenic in drinking water has been set at 50 parts per billion (PPB) or 0.05 microgrammes per litre of drinking water in Bangladesh, while the approved global standard set by the World Health ...


    By IRIN

  • Reliance on trade makes food systems vulnerable

    Boosting international trade may not be the best way to improve food security, as it makes many countries vulnerable to food shortages caused by market fluctuations, according to new research. A ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • IRRI and FAO step up joint efforts to globally bolster sustainable rice production

    FAO and the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) have agreed to cooperate more closely to support sustainable rice production in developing countries to improve food security and livelihoods while safeguarding natural resources. An agreement signed today seeks to better pool the scientific knowledge and technical know-how of the two organizations so that they can expand and ...

  • $15 million in USAID funding looks to spark ‘new era’ in agricultural data collection

    The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and FAO have signed a $15 million agreement aimed at boosting the capacity of developing countries to track key agricultural data -information that is essential to good policymaking and that will help track progress toward achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The  ...

  • Smartphone app offers cheap aflatoxin test for farmers

    A smartphone application could offer a cheap way for African farming communities to manage cancer-causing toxins produced by a fungus that grows on crops ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Non-food crops lock up enough calories to feed 4 billion

    Global calorie availability could be increased by as much as 70 per cent - feeding an additional 4 billion people - by shifting cropland use to produce food for humans rather than livestock feed and biofuels, according to new research. Such a shift could free up calories roughly equivalent to the yield increases achieved for maize, wheat and rice between 1965 and 2009, researchers say in the ...


    By GLOBE Foundation

Need help finding the right suppliers? Try XPRT Sourcing. Let the XPRTs do the work for you